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I've been implementing TRY-CATCH relative to USING like the following example:

private void someDatabaseMethod(string userName) {

    try {

        using(var conn = new SqlConnection(connString))
        using(var comm = new SqlCommand()) {
            comm.Connection = conn;
            comm.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
            comm.CommandText = string.Concat(@"SELECT UserID FROM xxx WHERE UserName = '", userName,@"'");
            conn.Open();
            object x = comm.ExecuteScalar();
            UserID = (x==null)? 0: (int)x;
        }
    } catch(Exception) {
        throw;
    }
}

I've just seen this MSDN EXAMPLE which seems to point towards the TRY-CATCH being within the USING. So my example would look like the following:

private void someDatabaseMethod(string userName) {

        using(var conn = new SqlConnection(connString))
        using(var comm = new SqlCommand()) {
            comm.Connection = conn;
            comm.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
            comm.CommandText = string.Concat(@"SELECT UserID FROM xxx WHERE UserName = '", userName,@"'");

            try {

               conn.Open();
               object x = comm.ExecuteScalar();
               UserID = (x==null)? 0: (int)x;

            } catch(Exception) {
               throw;
            }
        }
}

Is this a more efficient layout? If so, why?


EXTRA ADDITIONAL NOTE

The reason for the TRY-CATCH is to re-throw the exception so that I bubble it up to the next level - so I'd like to have a CATCH somewhere in the code.

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marked as duplicate by Habib, Arran, daryal, Joce, Tommy Apr 11 '13 at 17:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

TRY-CATCH I use in using only if I want to LOG Exception or it I have transaction - to rollback it in except block. using is translated by compiler in TRY-FINALLY - you can check it with IL Disassembler (ildasm.exe) or reflector to release your disposable resources. so that using is equivalent to :

try 
{
 //do job
} 
finally
{
  Resource.Dispose()
}
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It depends on your goals. If you want to do something with command or connection in catch block, then it should be within using.

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+1 for the classic "it depends" –  whytheq Apr 11 '13 at 15:34

If you just throw the catched exception, the try-catch block isn't necessary at all. The using will dispose the conenction and command properly.

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The reason for the TRY-CATCH is to re-throw the exception so that I can bubble it up to the next level - so I'd like to have a CATCH somewhere in the code. –  whytheq Apr 11 '13 at 14:47

Second one is more efficient. For first one; you can not access connection object from catch block, and can not close it. Also if you was using a transaction over this connection, you could not rollback the transaction when any error occurs...

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+1 for first one - if it errors on conn.Open(); what happens first: will the using deal with the problem and free resources ? or will it go to CATCH before using has a chance to garbage collect? –  whytheq Apr 11 '13 at 14:50
  • Don't catch exceptions you cannot handle at this place.
  • catch{throw;} is of no use except adding complexity
  • catch and handle exceptions as near at the exception source as you are able to handle them

Read extensive discussion here

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1  
catch{throw;} bubbles the exception up to a higher level and it is dealt with there –  whytheq Apr 11 '13 at 14:48
1  
And therefore catch-throw is for nothing as the exception will "bubble" up also without this construct. –  wonko79 Apr 11 '13 at 15:51

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