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I receive some errors regarding MSMQ, and can't find anything online to help me out. Here is the stacktrace:

System.Messaging.MessageQueueException (0x80004005): An invalid handle was passed to the function.
at System.Messaging.MessageQueue.ReceiveCurrent(TimeSpan timeout, Int32 action, CursorHandle cursor, MessagePropertyFilter filter, MessageQueueTransaction internalTransaction, MessageQueueTransactionType transactionType)
at System.Messaging.MessageQueue.Peek(TimeSpan timeout, Cursor cursor, PeekAction action)
at Utility.Msmq.MsmqManager.PeekWithoutTimeout(Cursor cursor, PeekAction action)
at Utility.Msmq.MsmqManager.SearchMessages(List`1 labels)

The queue is initialized using this code:

var queuePath = isIp
    ? (machineName == "127.0.0.1"
            ? string.Format(@".\Private$\{0}", queueName)
            : string.Format("FormatName:Direct=OS:{0}\\private$\\{1}", machineName,
                            queueName))
    : string.Format("FormatName:Direct=TCP:{0}\\private$\\{1}", machineName, queueName);

try
{
    _queue = MessageQueue.Exists(queuePath)
                    ? new MessageQueue(queuePath)
                    : MessageQueue.Create(queuePath, true);
    _queue.MessageReadPropertyFilter.Priority = true;
    _queue.SetPermissions("Everyone", MessageQueueAccessRights.FullControl);
}
catch(MessageQueueException)
{
    // Concurrent threads on a new company will try to create the queue at once, which throws an error
    // If this happens, wait 100ms, then check if queue was created by some other thread, and return it.
    while (!MessageQueue.Exists(queuePath))
    {
        Thread.Sleep(100);
    }
    _queue = new MessageQueue(queuePath);
}

This is the code that executes the peek on msmq

private Message PeekWithoutTimeout(Cursor cursor, PeekAction action)
{
    Message ret = null;
    try
    {
        ret = _queue.Peek(new TimeSpan(1), cursor, action);
    }
    catch (MessageQueueException mqe)
    {
        if (mqe.MessageQueueErrorCode != MessageQueueErrorCode.IOTimeout)
        {
            throw;
        }
    }
    catch (Exception generalException)
    {
        Loggers.CreateBillLogger.Error(generalException.Message, generalException);
        throw generalException;
    }

    return ret;
}

public List<Message> SearchMessages(List<string> labels)
{
    var count = 0;
    var cursor = _queue.CreateCursor();
    var messages = new List<Message>();

    var message = PeekWithoutTimeout(cursor, PeekAction.Current);
    if (message != null)
    {
        if (labels.Contains(message.Label))
        {
            messages.Add(message);
        }

        do
        {
            message = PeekWithoutTimeout(cursor, PeekAction.Next);
            if (message != null && labels.Contains(message.Label))
            {
                messages.Add(message);
            }
        } while (message != null);
    }

    return messages;
}

P.S. One thing I should note is this piece of code runs in a multi-threading environment, using BackgroundWorkers and there are high changes for two or more threads to try and create a queue at a time, leading to concurrent create. This issue was solved in the catch branch.

Is there something that I'm doing wrong ? Thanks !

share|improve this question
    
Thanks for fixing the layout of my post, M Patel. –  Daniel Hursan Apr 11 '13 at 10:26
    
Can you edit the post to show the full definition of PeekWithoutTimeout and also show the code that calls that method? In particular, make sure you show how cursor is defined :) –  RB. Apr 11 '13 at 10:37
    
Get rid of those try statements, they don't do anything but crash your code like this. If you can't create the queue, like the message says, then you want to know about it. –  Hans Passant Apr 11 '13 at 11:07
    
Hans, try is put there for a reason. The catch branch is doing logging, using log4net. I did not add the rest to keep things simple and easily readable. –  Daniel Hursan Apr 11 '13 at 11:50
    
Edited post to show full code –  Daniel Hursan Apr 11 '13 at 12:29

1 Answer 1

There appears to be an issue in a very old .NET framework version that almost perfectly matches this problem. I found it, and your post, because we're experiencing the same issue sometimes.

KB 826297 describes this issue occurring when calling ReceiveById in a multithreaded environment.

Edit: I thought a lock statement would be sufficient to fix it - but I misread their help article. It seems you might need to use the hack in the KB article

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