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If you can come up with a better title after reading the question, please feel free to change it.

So, as input I have an integer, which is an even number between 2 and 20. Let's call this integer $teams. What I need to do is generate a $teams x $teams sized matrix of numbers between 1 and $teams-1 (inclusive) while respecting the following rules:

  1. The diagonal (from top left to bottom right) has value -1.
  2. The same number may not appear in the same column or row more than once.
  3. If a number appears in column N, then in may not appear in row N. For example, if it appears in column #2, it may not appear in row #2, etc.

Note that we're only looking at the part above the diagonal. The part below it is just a reflection of that (each number is its reflection + $teams - 1), and it doesn't matter for this problem.

The first 2 conditions were fairly easy to accomplish, but the 3rd one is killing me. I don't know how to make it happen, especially since the $teams number could be any even number between 2 and 20. The code that gives a correct output for conditions 1 and 2 is given below. Can someone help me with condition number 3?

$teams = 6;         //example value - should work for any even Int between 2 and 20
$games = array();   //2D array tracking which week teams will be playing

//do the work
for( $i=1; $i<=$teams; $i++ ) {
    $games[$i] = array();
    for( $j=1; $j<=$teams; $j++ ) {
        $games[$i][$j] = getWeek($i, $j, $teams);
    }
}

//show output
echo '<pre>';
$max=0;
foreach($games as $key => $row) {
    foreach($row as $k => $col) {
        printf('%4d', is_null($col) ? -2 : $col);
        if($col > $max){
            $max=$col;
        }
    }
    echo "\n";
}
printf("%d teams in %d weeks, %.2f weeks per team\n", $teams, $max, $max/$teams);
echo '</pre>';

function getWeek($home, $away, $num_teams) {
    if($home == $away){
        return -1;
    }
    $week = $home+$away-2;
    if($week >= $num_teams){
        $week = $week-$num_teams+1;
    }
    if($home>$away){
        $week += $num_teams-1;
    }

    return $week;
}

The current code (for $teams=6) gives the following output:

  -1   1   2   3   4   5
   6  -1   3   4   5   1
   7   8  -1   5   1   2
   8   9  10  -1   2   3
   9  10   6   7  -1   4
  10   6   7   8   9  -1
6 teams in 10 weeks, 1.67 weeks per team

As you see, the number 1 appears both in the 2nd column and 2nd row, number 4 appears both in the 5th column and 5th row etc, which breaks rule #3.

share|improve this question
    
Maybe there are easier solutions, but you could have a look at backtracking: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backtracking –  Misch Apr 11 '13 at 12:21
    
Thanks, but I'd rather explore easier potential solutions first. Backtracking looks like it could definitely solve it, but would take a lot of effort and doesn't seem very efficient in terms of number of iterations (though that's not too much of an issue considering the small number of $teams). –  robert Apr 11 '13 at 12:36
1  
One thing that occurred to me is when you said "the number appears in the n th column", that refers to the nth collumn of the first row. Well, you know that in the first row you have the numbers from -1 to n-1. When you generate the numbers for row number x you can easily skip the number which is in $games[1][x]. Hope that helps somewhat ;-) –  Havelock Apr 11 '13 at 12:41
    
@Havelock I will try that, thanks. I suspect that the last row will have a wrong entry though, since there will be no choice at that point. –  robert Apr 11 '13 at 12:47
2  
@robert I'd say try to get a correct solution on a piece of paper first, to then see whether you can extract some dependency between the numbers in the rows and columns, that would lead you to the correct algorithm. –  Havelock Apr 11 '13 at 14:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+100

I don't believe there is a deterministic way of solving this problem without having your program do some trial-and-error (guessing and then backtracking if the guess conflicts with the rules).

My idea is to only modify the getWeek() function, but pass the $games array to it, then:

  1. create and array of all matrix elements that belong to the same row or column as our element
  2. check if our week already belongs to the same row or corresponding column
  3. if so, then choose it randomly using the formulas I provided
  4. do this in a while loop until the guess is good, then move on

I tested it for 4, 6, 8, 10 and 20 teams and it worked perfectly. I put in a safety mechanism that will set $week to 0 in case the while loop threatens to turn into an infinite one, but that will not happen.

Here's the entire code:

$teams = 10;
    $games = array();   //2D array tracking which week teams will be playing

    //do the work
    for( $i=1; $i<=$teams; $i++ ) {
        $games[$i] = array();
        for( $j=1; $j<=$teams; $j++ ) {
            $games[$i][$j] = getWeek($i, $j, $teams, $games);
        }
    }

    echo '<pre>';
    $max=0;
    foreach($games as $key => $row) {
        foreach($row as $k => $col) {
            printf('%4d', is_null($col) ? -2 : $col);
            if($col > $max){
                $max=$col;
            }
        }
        echo "\n";
    }
    printf("%d teams in %d weeks, %.2f weeks per team\n", $teams, $max, $max/$teams);
    echo '</pre>';

getWeek function:

function getWeek($home, $away, $num_teams, $games) {
    if($home == $away){
        return -1;
    }
    $week = $home+$away-2;
    if($week >= $num_teams){
        $week = $week-$num_teams+1;
    }
    if($home>$away){
        $week += $num_teams-1;
    }

    $tries=0;
    $problems=array();

    //create array of all matrix elements that have the same row or column (regardless of value)
    foreach($games as $key => $row) {
        foreach($row as $k => $col) {
            if($home==$key || $home==$k || $away==$key || $away==$k)
                $problems[]=$col;   
        }
    }

    while(in_array($week, $problems)) {

        if($home<=$away)
                $week=rand(1,$num_teams-1);
            else
                $week=rand($num_teams,2*($num_teams-1));

            $tries++;
            if($tries==1000){
                $week=0;
                break;
            }
        }

    return $week;
}

And this is the result for $teams=10:

  -1   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9
  10  -1   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   2
  11  12  -1   5   6   7   8   9   1   4
  12  13  14  -1   7   8   9   1   2   6
  13  14  15  16  -1   9   1   2   3   8
  14  15  16  17  18  -1   2   3   4   1
  15  16  17  18  10  11  -1   4   5   3
  16  17  18  10  11  12  13  -1   6   5
  17  18  10  11  12  13  14  15  -1   7
  18  11  13  15  17  10  12  14  16  -1
10 teams in 18 weeks, 1.80 weeks per team
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect jovan, thanks a lot! Answer accepted - bounty will be awarded tomorrow. –  robert Apr 14 '13 at 19:37
    
Well, I'd rather prefer a solution without backtracking if there is one - and there is... –  Sven Apr 14 '13 at 22:52
    
I see now that there is, I stand corrected. –  jovan Apr 15 '13 at 10:26

The question can be solved without any guessing or backtracing by creating a round-robin schedule for n teams playing against each other in n rounds, then from this build an array representing the schedule as described in the question

To build the schedule place the n (here 6) teams in two rows

1 2 3
6 5 4

This is round 1, where 1 meets 6, 2 meets 5, and 3 meets 4.

Then for each round, rotate the teams except team 1, giving the complete schedule

Round 1    Round 2    Round 3    Round 4    Round 5
1 2 3      1 3 4      1 4 5      1 5 6      1 6 2    
6 5 4      2 6 5      3 2 6      4 3 2      5 4 3  

This can be represented as an array with each row representing one week in which the team in the first column meets the team in the last, second meets second last etc.

1 2 3 4 5 6  (Week 1: 1-6, 2-5, 3-4)
1 3 4 5 6 2  (Week 2: 1-2, 3-6, 4-5)
1 4 5 6 2 3  (Week 3: 1-3, 2-4, 5-6)
1 5 6 2 3 4  (Week 4: 1-4, 3-5, 2-6)
1 6 2 3 4 5  (Week 5: 1-5, 4-6, 2-3)

Representing the teams as rows and columns, with weeks as table entries, this becomes

-1  1  2  3  4  5
 6 -1  4  2  5  3
 7  9 -1  5  3  1
 8  7 10 -1  1  4
 9 10  8  6 -1  2
10  8  6  9  7 -1 

Following is the code to generate this for various number of teams:

<?php

function buildSchedule($teams) {
  // Returns a table with one row for each round of the tournament                   
  // Matrix is built by rotating all entries except first one from row to row,       
  // giving a matrix with zeroes in first column, other values along diagonals       
  // In each round, team in first column meets team in last,                         
  // team in second column meets second last etc.                                    
  $schedule = array();
  for($i=1; $i<$teams; $i++){
    for($j=0; $j<$teams; $j++){
      $schedule[$i][$j] = $j==0 ? 0 : ($i+$j-1) % ($teams-1) + 1;
    }
  }
  return $schedule;
}

function buildWeekTable($schedule) {
  // Convert schedule into desired format                                            

  //create n x n array of -1                                                         
  $teams = sizeof($schedule)+1;
  $table = array_pad(array(), $teams, array_pad(array(), $teams, -1));

  // Set table[i][j] to week where team i will meet team j                           
  foreach($schedule as $week => $player){
    for($i = 0; $i < $teams/2 ; $i++){
      $team1 = $player[$i];
      $team2 = $player[$teams-$i-1];
      $table[$team1][$team2] = $team2 > $team1 ? $week : $week + $teams -1;
      $table[$team2][$team1] = $team1 > $team2 ? $week : $week + $teams -1;
    }
  }
  return $table;
}

function dumpTable($table){
  foreach($table as $row){
    $cols = sizeof($row);
    for($j=0; $j<$cols; $j++){
      printf(" %3d", isset($row[$j]) ? $row[$j] : -1);
    }
    echo "\n";
  }
}

$teams = 6;

$schedule = buildSchedule($teams);
$weekplan = buildWeekTable($schedule);
dumpTable($weekplan);
share|improve this answer
    
I like this. Most of the schedule can be static, because there needs to be only one solution. If there is a need for randomizing teams, then randomize the teams, not the schedule. –  Sven Apr 14 '13 at 22:50
    
@Sven That was what I thought about randomizing as well. Another way to randomize the result somewhat is to reorder the rows of the table returned from buildSchedule. This is possible as each row satisfies requrements #2 and #3 (each team plays only one match in a given week). –  Terje D. Apr 15 '13 at 5:15
    
Great answer Terje, better than mine. Still, I don't think it's possible to randomize by reordering rows - for instance, if you switch rows 2 and 3 in your solution, number 1 would appear both in row 2 and column 2. –  jovan Apr 15 '13 at 7:53
    
@jovan I was not talking about switching rows in the solution, but in the intermediate table where each row contains a permutation of the team numbers. Switching two rows in this table results in switching of the corresponding week numbers in the solution. –  Terje D. Apr 15 '13 at 10:20
    
Wow, nice one. Shouldn't this be the correct answer? –  Thomas Jensen Apr 16 '13 at 9:04

One solution is to pass to getWeek() an array with the numbers you want to exclude (ie. an array with all the numbers that are on the column equivalent to the current row).

You can create such an exclude array, and pass it to getWeek() like this:

//do the work
for( $i=1; $i<=$teams; $i++ ) {
    $games[$i] = array();
    for( $j=1; $j<=$teams; $j++ ) {
        $exclude = array();
        for ( $h=1; $h<=$i; $h++ ) {
           if ( isset($games[$h][$j]) ) {
              $exclude[] = $games[$h][$j];
           }
        }
        $games[$i][$j] = getWeek($i, $j, $teams, $exclude);
    }
}

Then what is left is to check within getWeek() to not include one of the numbers passed in the $exclude array, something like this:

function getWeek($home, $away, $num_teams, $exclude) {
    //
    // Here goes your code to calculate $week
    //

    if (in_array($week, $exclude)) {
       //the calculated $week is in the $exclude array, so you need
       //to calculate a new value which is not in the $exclude array
       $week = $your_new_valid_value;
    }

    return $week;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I will try this out and get back to you. At first glance, looks like it could work but I still suspect the last row will present a problem, as there's nothing to skip to. –  robert Apr 14 '13 at 16:33
    
It didn't quite work, printing out the $exclude array didn't show the correct values, and besides, what is $your_new_valid_value? As jovan's answer shows, I think there needs to be a while loop there, not an if condition. –  robert Apr 14 '13 at 19:36

UPDATED: I've tried to implement a solution using backtracking. The code could probably need a rewrite (maybe a class) and things could be optimized.

The idea is to walk through all solutions, but stop a branch as soon as it becomes clear, that the branch is breaking one of the three rules. With 6 teams, a solution is found within 71 tries - even though there are therotically 759,375 combinations.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1_%2B_2_%2B_3_%2B_4_%2B_%E2%8B%AF for calculating total games needed.

<?php
$size = 10;

$gamesPerTeam = $size-1;
$games = ($gamesPerTeam*($gamesPerTeam+1))/2;

$gamePlan = array_fill(0, $games, 1);

function increaseGamePlan(&$gamePlan, $pointOfFailure, $gamesPerTeam) {
    if ($gamePlan[$pointOfFailure] === $gamesPerTeam) {
        $gamePlan[$pointOfFailure] = 1;
        increaseGamePlan($gamePlan, $pointOfFailure-1, $gamesPerTeam);
    } else {
        $gamePlan[$pointOfFailure]++;
    }

}

function checkWeekFor($i, $row, $column, &$pools) {
    if ($column-$row <= 0)
        return '-';

    if (!in_array($i, $pools['r'][$row]) && !in_array($i, $pools['c'][$column]) && !in_array($i, $pools['c'][$row])) {
        $pools['r'][$row][] = $i;
        $pools['c'][$column][] = $i;
        return true;
    }
}

$a = 0;
while (true) {
    $a++;
    $m = [];

    $pools = [
        'r' => [],
        'c' => [],
    ];
    $i = 0;
    for ($row = 0;$row < $size;$row++) {
        $m[$row] = array();
        $pools['r'][$row] = array();
        for ($column = 0;$column < $size;$column++) {
            if ($column-$row <= 0)
                continue;

            if (!isset($pools['c'][$column]))
                $pools['c'][$column] = array();

            if (!isset($pools['c'][$row]))
                $pools['c'][$row] = array();

            $week = $gamePlan[$i];
            if (!checkWeekFor($week, $row, $column, $pools)) {
                for ($u = $i+1;$u < $games;$u++)
                    $gamePlan[$u] = 1;
                increaseGamePlan($gamePlan, $i, $gamesPerTeam);
                continue 3;
            }
            $m[$row][$column] = $week;
            $i++;
        }
    }
    echo 'found after '.$a.' tries.';
    break;
}

?>
<style>
    td {
        width: 40px;
        height: 40px;
    }
</style>
<table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0">
    <?
    for ($row = 0;$row < $size;$row++) {
        ?>
        <tr>
            <?
            for ($column = 0;$column < $size;$column++) {
                ?>
                <td><?=$column-$row <= 0?'-':$m[$row][$column]?></td>
                <?
            }
            ?>
        </tr>
        <?
    }
    ?>
</table>

It prints:

found after 1133 tries.
-   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9
-   -   3   2   5   4   7   6   9   8
-   -   -   1   6   7   8   9   4   5
-   -   -   -   7   8   9   4   5   6
-   -   -   -   -   9   1   8   2   3
-   -   -   -   -   -   2   3   6   1
-   -   -   -   -   -   -   5   3   4
-   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   1   2
-   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   7
-   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -
share|improve this answer
    
Number 1 still appears in column2 and row2. –  bestprogrammerintheworld Apr 14 '13 at 16:10
    
Thomas, you have two extra "weeks" (values in the matrix). There are no contradictions with rule #3 because you added week 6 and week 7 into the mix. I need to keep only 5 (n-1) weeks. –  robert Apr 14 '13 at 16:36
    
@robert I don't see how that's possible, as my program should always use the lowest possible value. Unless I've misunderstood one of your rules, they are implemented 1-1. If you have an example of a valid scheme, please post and I'll try to adjust my code. –  Thomas Jensen Apr 14 '13 at 17:38
    
@bestprogrammerintheworld, it's a reflection as requested in the question: "Note that we're only looking at the part above the diagonal. The part below it is just a reflection of that ..." –  Thomas Jensen Apr 14 '13 at 17:42
1  
no, you should not remove it. It is not optimal way for this task, but can help as a guide for other situations. Just as a backtracking's hello world –  Luis Siquot Aug 27 '13 at 15:40

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