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I have written this xhrWithRetry method.

Purpose: This util method will retry couple of times, in case service calls fails with error code 500. client code that calls this util method, should be able to catch any exception thrown in this util method by chaining a then handler. Each retry should be delayed by few ms.

In my testing,

  1. I am able to catch the exception thrown at the end after max retries, in the calling code.
  2. Code works for non-error scenario also.

This question is primarily to see if there is any significantly better way to write the same async function.

WinJS.Namespace.define('Utils.Http',
{
    xhrWithRetry: function xhrWithRetry(options, retryCount)
    {
        var maxRetries = 5;
        if (retryCount == undefined)
            retryCount = 0;

        return WinJS.xhr(options).then(null, function onerror(error)
        {
            if (error.status == 500 && retryCount < maxRetries)
                return WinJS.Promise.timeout(100).then(function retryxhr()
                {
                    return Utils.Http.xhrWithRetry(options, retryCount + 1);
                });

            throw error;
        });
    }
});
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2 Answers 2

You could make maxRetries and the timeout configurable, but generally speaking this looks very good.

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I think the way you have it is probably the most efficient way to achieve what you're looking for. Now that I've thought about it more, I've seen other implementations of a retry function in the context of Promise/A that look nearly identical.

Therefore the only tweaks I can think of past @ma_il 's suggestion to make the number of retries configurable are mainly stylistic to keep with JS Hint-based coding standards. The only two real nit-picky suggestions are:

  1. Short circuit your if statement by seeing if the retryCount has been exceeded before even bothering to check the status.
  2. Use a strict equals (===) on the status check.
WinJS.Namespace.define('Utils.Http', (function () {

    function xhrWithRetry(options, retryCount) {
        var maxRetries = 5;
        if (!retryCount) {
            retryCount = 0;
        }

        return WinJS.xhr(options).then(null,
            function onError(error) {
                if (retryCount < maxRetries && error.status === 500) {
                    return WinJS.Promise.timeout(100).then(function retryxhr() {
                        return xhrWithRetry(options, ++retryCount);
                    });
                }

                throw error;
            });
    }

    return {
        xhrWithRetry: xhrWithRetry
    };

}()));
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then() always returns a Promise. In case of exception, no return or return of value that is not a promise - it wraps it in a Promise whose fulfilled value is the return value. btw - the trick to return { x: x } in the function above is nice. thanks. –  Sushil Apr 12 '13 at 2:22
    
I had a hard time parsing your second sentence until I tried out your code from above. I didn't know that if in your first .then() call you pass null for success, it forwards your value to the next .then() call. As well didn't know if you throw an error it automatically wraps it in a promise for you. I think I misread your question the first time. Accordingly I'll update my answer. –  GotDibbs Apr 12 '13 at 3:10
    
thanks for the link to the other implementation. –  Sushil Apr 12 '13 at 5:14
    
@GotDibbs why did you decide to export the xhrWithRetry in such a way and not just simply use: WinJS.Namespace.define('Utils.Http', { xhrWithRetry: function(options, retryCount) {} }); –  philk Apr 12 '13 at 12:09
    
@philk It's purely stylistic. Defining objects using the revealing module pattern allows for "private" functions and variables, gives you a nice "class" signature at the end of the definition (so you know what is "public"), you don't have to reference the this keyword all over the place, and your functions in the namespace are then named (not anonymous) by default (aka no having to do xhrWithRetry: function xhrWithRetry()) which helps with stack traces. –  GotDibbs Apr 12 '13 at 13:27

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