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I have the following code as seen in ideone.com:

import java.util.*;

class Test{
   interface Visitor{
        public <T> void visit(T Value);
   }

   class MyVisitor<T> implements Visitor{
        List<T> list = new  ArrayList<T>();

        public <T> void visit(T value){
           list.add(value);
        }
    }
}

When compiled this code will produce the following+ error:

 Main.java:12: error: no suitable method found for add(T#1)
             list.add(value);
                 ^
     method List.add(int,T#2) is not applicable
       (actual and formal argument lists differ in length)
     method List.add(T#2) is not applicable
       (actual argument T#1 cannot be converted to T#2 by method invocation conversion)   where T#1,T#2 are type-variables:
     T#1 extends Object declared in method visit(T#1)
     T#2 extends Object declared in class Test.MyVisitor 1 error

The problem is that the type T in visit is not considered the same T in list . How can I fix this compilation problem?

share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted
class MyVisitor<T> implements Visitor{
    List<T> list = new  ArrayList<T>();

    public <T> void visit(T value){
       list.add(value);
    }
}

is equivalent to

class MyVisitor<T> implements Visitor{
    List<T> list = new  ArrayList<T>();

    public <V> void visit(V value){
       list.add(value);
    }
}

i.e. the T parameter to the class and the T parameter to the visit method are not related, and neither is necessarily assignable to the other. If Visitor were itself a parameterized interface

interface Visitor<V>{
    public void visit(V Value);
}

then you could have MyVisitor<T> implements Visitor<T> and the T's would then be the same.

Remember that the point of generic methods is to link the types of two or more parameters, or to link the type of a parameter to the return type of the method (e.g. a method that takes a parameter of some type and returns a List of the same type). When a generic method only uses its parameter once it doesn't really gain anything from being generic, i.e. you would get just as much type safety from

interface Visitor{
    public void visit(Object Value);
}

as you would from your original Visitor interface.

share|improve this answer
    
This also will not compile – Andremoniy Apr 11 '13 at 11:32
    
@Andremoniy This answer explains what OP really did in his code with alternative example so of course it will also not compile. – Pshemo Apr 11 '13 at 11:38
    
And if I could not alter Visitor interface? Would I have to use a raw type List since I would not able to match the T and after erasure T would be Object? – André Oriani Apr 11 '13 at 11:44
    
@Ian Roberts This says I would go back to the "unchecked" warnings – André Oriani Apr 11 '13 at 11:53
    
@AndréOriani the only way to do it with no warnings and no @SuppressWarnings would be to have a constructor MyVisitor(Class<T> cls) and pass in at runtime the Class object corresponding to the type parameter of MyVisitor, then in visit do list.add(cls.cast(value)); This would compile but it would still fail at runtime if visit was called with a parameter of the wrong type. – Ian Roberts Apr 11 '13 at 12:28

You are declaring the generic type <T> twice:

  • on the visit method
  • on the MyVisitor class

The compiler prevents the adding to the list: list.add(value); as the two types might be different.

One way to solve the problem is to make the Visitor interface generic in <T> and remove the <T> on the visit method:

interface Visitor<T> {
        public void visit(T Value);
    }

class MyVisitor<T> implements Visitor<T>{
    List<T> list = new  ArrayList<T>();

    public  void visit(T value){
        list.add(value);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The interface has to be Visitor<T>

Edit: The interface has to look like this

interface Visitor<T> {
    void visit(T Value);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Not really, that would make things even more confusing because of the generic type parameter shadowing – millimoose Apr 11 '13 at 11:30
    
The think the suggestion is to make the method generic in the class' T. – Boris the Spider Apr 11 '13 at 11:31
    
Oops, forgot to mention that you also had to get rid of the generic method definition. – Lucas Hoepner Apr 12 '13 at 11:38

The correct solution will be:

class Test {
    interface Visitor<T> {
        public void visit(T Value);
    }

    class MyVisitor<T> implements Visitor<T> {
        List<T> list = new ArrayList<T>();

        @Override
        public void visit(T value) {
           list.add(value);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You're shadowing the type parameter T in MyVisitor<T> (and thus the type of items in list) with the one in the method signature, which can be a different type altogether. (Any type passed to visit() which can be any type and might as well be Object.) You should rename one or the other.

In fact, the method signature in the visitor is inane as far as Java generics are concerned. Just make it void visit(Object o), it's exactly equivalent and less confusing. Doing so also makes the problem clearer, you're trying to add an Object to a List<T>. If you need the method signature in Visitor to be that, you'll have to cast. (Which will require a Class.cast() and thus a Class<T> somewhere in MyVisitor)

share|improve this answer

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