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I must be able to use the command below where T can be any type, such as string.

Counter<T> counter;  

Counter should be able to hold multiple items so I have chosen to implement this as a vector. Each item must itself consist of a variable of type T (so a string if we continue the above example) and an int. I need to keep the solution as simple as possible as later on I will need to create functions that print out each item by descending int value amongst other tasks. I have had a go with the following code but 1) it doesn't work and 2) is there a better solution?

#include<string>
#include<cstdlib>
#include<vector>

template<class T>
class Record{
      T itemtype;
      int total;   
   public:
      int increment(T item);
      int count(T item);
      void printSummary();
};


class Counter{
      vector<Record> data;
};

int main(){

   Counter<string> counter;   

   return 0;
}
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Please explain what "it doesn't work" means. –  Drew Dormann Apr 11 '13 at 11:41
    
Whell we can't see the implementation of Record moreover you use Counter as a template class but actually it's not a template and you don't specify the template argument for Record... –  Adriano Repetti Apr 11 '13 at 11:42
    
Counter class should be template too. –  Ashot Apr 11 '13 at 11:42
    
@Drew Dormann $ g++ Counter2.h -o Counter2 Counter2.h:17:7: error: ‘vector’ does not name a type Counter2.h: In function ‘int main()’: Counter2.h:22:4: error: ‘Counter’ is not a template Counter2.h:22:12: error: ‘string’ was not declared in this scope Counter2.h:22:12: note: suggested alternative: /usr/lib/gcc/i686-redhat-linux/4.6.3/../../../../include/c++/4.6.3/bits/stringfw‌​d.h:65:33: note: ‘std::string’ –  user1905552 Apr 11 '13 at 11:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your program contains a few mistakes, pointed out below.

Minor issue:

First of all, a minor thing: you don't need to include the <cstdlib> header - at least not for what you are showing.

#include<string>
// #include<cstdlib> // <== (YOU DON'T SEEM TO NEED THIS)
#include<vector>

First problem:

If you use unqualified names to refer to objects that live in a namespace, you should first have a using declaration that lets the compiler resolve those unqualified names to the correct fully qualified names (i.e. including the namespace they belong to).

For instance, vector and string belong to the std namespace. Thus, either you use those names in fully qualified form (std::vector and std::string), or you add proper using declarations, as done below:

using std::vector; // USING DECLARATIONS TO ALLOW UNQUALIFIED NAMES SUCH AS
using std::string; // string AND vector TO BE CORRECTLY RESOLVED

Second problem:

Finally, what you want is to make your class Counter parameterized, and that parameter should be used for instantiating the internal vector. Therefore, Counter must also be a class template (that's how you are using it in your main() function, after all):

// MAKE THIS A CLASS TEMPLATE!
template<typename T>
class Counter{
      vector<Record<T>> data;
};

Conclusion:

After all the above corrections have been implemented, this is how your code should look like:

#include<string>
#include<vector>

using std::vector;
using std::string;

template<class T>
class Record{
      T itemtype;
      int total;   
   public:
      int increment(T item);
      int count(T item);
      void printSummary();
};

template<typename T>
class Counter{
      vector<Record<T>> data;
};

int main(){

   Counter<string> counter;   

   return 0;
}

Here is a live example showing the above piece of code compiling.

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thanks for the detailed response. How would I access each itemtype and total? eg if(Record.itemtype.count(item == 0){ Record.push_back(itemtype = item, Record.total = 1); } –  user1905552 Apr 11 '13 at 12:19
    
@user1905552: Like for all classes, you need an object of that class in order to access its members. Class templates are no exception. So you can't do Record.itemtype, because Record is the name of a class (template), not of an object. You can do, however (Record<string> myRecord; myRecord.itemtype = 0; etc.) –  Andy Prowl Apr 11 '13 at 12:25
    
template<class T> int Counter <T> :: increment(T item){ if(data.count(data.itemtype == 0)){ data.push_back(data.itemtype = item, data.total = 1); }else{ for(int i=0; i < data.size(data.itemtype); i++){ if(data[i].itemtype == item){ data[i].total = data[i].total + 1; break; } } } } what am I doing wrong here? –  user1905552 Apr 11 '13 at 12:58
    
@user1905552: increment() is a member function of Record, not of the Counter class template –  Andy Prowl Apr 11 '13 at 13:01
    
sorry I moved increment() to Counter –  user1905552 Apr 11 '13 at 13:10

You got it wrong, you need to make Counter parameterizable:

template <typename T>
class Counter{
      vector<Record<T> > data;
};

Of course, this means that all records in your counter will contain strings.

If "Counter should be able to hold multiple items" really means that one instance of Counter should contain various types or records (e.g. both strings and ints) then you need to use something like VARIANT or boost::any or boost::variant or something similar depending on your requirements and technology that you use, e.g.

Counter<boost::any> counter;
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I think you meant to do this:

template<class T>
class Record{
      T itemtype;
      int total;   
   public:
      int increment(T item);
      int count(T item);
      void printSummary();
};

template<class RECORDTYPE>
class Counter{
      vector<Record<RECORDTYPE>> data;
};

int main(){

   Counter<string> counter;   

   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, does it make a difference if I use T in both templates? –  user1905552 Apr 11 '13 at 11:52
    
It doesn't matter, it's just a template parameter name. –  Yochai Timmer Apr 11 '13 at 12:47

Record is a template so you cannot just have vector<Record> you must have a vector of a type of record, i.e. vector<Record<T> >

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