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I'm currently making a code on the MU game using dynamic arrays, and I've got a problem with printing a sequence.

Rule: If the first character is denoted by the character M, and the rest of the sequence is denoted by R, then the new sequence is MRR.

Examples include:

Current sequence: MIUI

New sequence: MIUIIUI

Current sequence: MUM

New sequence: MUMUM

Current sequence: MU

New sequence: MUU

Here are snippets of my code:

IN MAIN:

if (userchoice == 2)
{
    if (rule2valid == false)
    {
        cout << "This rule may not be applied to your input." << endl;
        return 0;
    }       
    int newsize = size + size - 1;
    char *resultant = new char[newsize];
    resultant = applyRule2(userinput, size);
    printarray (resultant, newsize);
}   

In the function which applies the rule:

char *applyRule2(char* sequence, int size)
{
int newsize = size + size - 1;
int j = 1;

char* applyRule = new char[newsize];
for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    applyRule[i] = sequence[i];
for (int i = size; i < newsize; i++)
{
    applyRule[i] == sequence[j];
}   
return applyRule;
}

and the function for printing:

void printarray(char* sequence, int size)
{
for (int i = 0; i < size; i++){
cout << sequence[i] << "\t";    
}
cout << "The length of this array is : " << size;
cout << endl;
}

The problem is that when I run the program, my output is as such:

Input: M U M

Output: M U M, The length of this string is 5. (supposed to be M U M U M)

Input: M I U I

Output: M I U I, the length of this string is 7. (supposed to be M I U I I U I)

What I have done so far is that I allocated a new dynamic array with the new size, and added values into the array accordingly. I am, however, at a loss as to whether the problem lies in the applyRule2 function or in the printarray function.

It would be greatly appreciated if someone could point me out in the right direction.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There are a few error in your code. As Alf says you really should use std::string. but anyway here are some of the errors.

for (int i = size; i < newsize; i++)
{
    applyRule[i] == sequence[j];
}

should be

for (int i = size; i < newsize; i++)
{
    applyRule[i] = sequence[j];
}

You had a double equals == when you should have written one equals =. Your compiler should have warned you about this, pay attention to compiler warnings.

Another error

char *resultant = new char[newsize];
resultant = applyRule2(userinput, size);

should be

char *resultant = applyRule2(userinput, size);

The code you have written allocates some memory and then on the very next line it throws away that memory and instead uses the memory you allocated in applyRule2. So this isn't actually a bug, but it is a waste of resources. Your program will never get back the wasted memory. This is called a memory leak.

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Thanks! I kind of overlooked the assignment and comparison equal signs. As for the second error in my code, I'm a little confused about the concept. From the code that you helped re-write, does this mean that you're creating a new dynamic array without allocating new memory to it? Or is it that you're just modifying the values of the userinput dynamic array and then placing the new values into resultant? Also, how would using std::string help? Why is there a need to use it as what I'm doing is made purely of char? Thanks for your help so far, and also @alf ! Much appreciated. –  user2270175 Apr 11 '13 at 13:08
    
You are allocating a new array, you do it here char* applyRule = new char[newsize]; in applyRule2. applyRule2 then returns that new array where it is assigned to the resultant variable. With your original code you were allocating a new array twice. –  john Apr 11 '13 at 13:11
    
Using std::string would help by managing the allocation of the memory for you. For instance the eight lines of code in applyRule2 could be written with one line of code using std::string. –  john Apr 11 '13 at 13:15

just use std::string instead of raw arrays and raw pointers and new

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