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I have this html:

<input type="text" name="textField" />
 <input type="submit" value="send" />

How can I do something like this:

  • When the text field is empty the submit should be disabled (disabled="disabled").
  • When something is typed in the text field to remove the disabled attribute.
  • If the text field becomes empty again(the text is deleted) the submit button should be disabled again.

I tried something like this:

$(document).ready(function(){
     $('input[type="submit"]').attr('disabled','disabled');
     $('input[type="text"]').change(function(){
            if($(this).val != ''){
               $('input[type="submit"]').removeAttr('disabled');
            }
     });
 });

..but it doesn't work. Any ideas? Thanks.

share|improve this question
3  
thanks,the 'removeAttr('disabled')' was what i exactly needed. –  hd. Nov 30 '10 at 11:30

9 Answers 9

up vote 370 down vote accepted

The problem is that the change event fires only when focus is moved away from the input (e.g. someone clicks off the input or tabs out of it). Try using keyup instead:

$(document).ready(function() {
     $('input[type="submit"]').attr('disabled','disabled');
     $('input[type="text"]').keyup(function() {
        if($(this).val() != '') {
           $('input[type="submit"]').removeAttr('disabled');
        }
     });
 });
share|improve this answer
    
ok, but the problem is when i delete the last letter i have to press even one more time to capture the empty val and disable my button, cause when i press the backspace to delete the last letter my field is still populated , so my keypress is captured and then the letter is deleted. so...how should i do it right? –  kmunky Oct 20 '09 at 14:52
1  
Oh, my apologies for not testing the code first. If you replace keypress with keyup does that help? –  Eric Palakovich Carr Oct 20 '09 at 15:14
    
yup it does, thanks again :) –  kmunky Oct 20 '09 at 15:16
    
it should be $(this).val() –  nEEbz Mar 7 '11 at 8:30
8  
The prop('disabled', true) method should be used over the attr('disabled','disabled') method see the docs on prop() –  Martin Jul 15 '14 at 9:47
$(function() {
  $(":text").keypress(check_submit).each(function() {
    check_submit();
  });
});

function check_submit() {
  if ($(this).val().length == 0) {
    $(":submit").attr("disabled", true);
  } else {
    $(":submit").removeAttr("disabled");
  }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
yap it works! but..one question though...can you explain this : $(":text").keypress(check_submit).each(function() { check_submit(); }); thanks –  kmunky Oct 20 '09 at 15:09
    
The problem with this one is that jQuery's keypress event doesn't consistently fire when the backspace or delete keys are pressed. This means that the user can back out the text and the function won't get called which is a UX fail. I'm seeing keyup as the means that most people are using. I don't quite like it; I want the feedback to happen on keydown but it's a bit difficult to pull off. –  BobRodes Aug 11 '13 at 20:42

or for us that dont like to use jQ for every little thing:

document.getElementById("submitButtonId").disabled = true;
share|improve this answer
10  
It's great that you're a Javascript vegetarian and everything, but this doesn't actually answer the question at all. –  Michelle Jul 7 '14 at 14:24

eric, your code did not seem to work for me when the user enters text then deletes all the text. i created another version if anyone experienced the same problem. here ya go folks:

$('input[type="submit"]').attr('disabled','disabled');
$('input[type="text"]').keyup(function(){
    if($('input[type="text"]').val() == ""){
        $('input[type="submit"]').attr('disabled','disabled');
    }
    else{
        $('input[type="submit"]').removeAttr('disabled');
    }
})
share|improve this answer

This question is 2 years old but it's still a good question and it was the first Google result ... but all of the existing answers recommend setting and removing the HTML attribute (removeAttr("disabled")) "disabled". There is a lot of confusion regarding attribute vs. property.

HTML

The "disabled" in <input type="button" disabled> in the markup is called a boolean attribute by the W3C.

HTML vs. DOM

Quote:

A property is in the DOM; an attribute is in the HTML that is parsed into the DOM.

http://stackoverflow.com/a/7572855/664132

JQuery

Related:

Nevertheless, the most important concept to remember about the checked attribute is that it does not correspond to the checked property. The attribute actually corresponds to the defaultChecked property and should be used only to set the initial value of the checkbox. The checked attribute value does not change with the state of the checkbox, while the checked property does. Therefore, the cross-browser-compatible way to determine if a checkbox is checked is to use the property...

Relevant:

Properties generally affect the dynamic state of a DOM element without changing the serialized HTML attribute. Examples include the value property of input elements, the disabled property of inputs and buttons, or the checked property of a checkbox. The .prop() method should be used to set disabled and checked instead of the .attr() method.

$( "input" ).prop( "disabled", false );

As for the disable on change part of the question: There is an event called "input", but browser support is limited and it's not a jQuery event, so jQuery won't make it work. The change event works reliably, but is fired when the element loses focus. So one might combine the two (some people also listen for keyup and paste).

Here's an untested piece of code to show what I mean:

$(document).ready(function() {
    var $submit = $('input[type="submit"]');
    $submit.prop('disabled', true);
    $('input[type="text"]').on('input change', function() { //'input change keyup paste'
        if ($(this).val() != '') {
            $submit.prop('disabled', false);
       }
    });
});
share|improve this answer

Here's the solution for file input field.

To disable a submit button for file field when a file is not chosen, then enable after the user chooses a file to upload:

$(document).ready(function(){
    $("#submitButtonId").attr("disabled", "disabled");
    $("#fileFieldId").change(function(){
        $("#submitButtonId").removeAttr("disabled");
    });
});

Html:

<%= form_tag your_method_path, :multipart => true do %><%= file_field_tag :file, :accept => "text/csv", :id => "fileFieldId" %><%= submit_tag "Upload", :id => "submitButtonId" %><% end %>
share|improve this answer

you can also use something like this :

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('input[type="submit"]').attr('disabled', true);
    $('input[type="text"]').on('keyup',function() {
        if($(this).val() != '') {
            $('input[type="submit"]').attr('disabled' , false);
        }else{
            $('input[type="submit"]').attr('disabled' , true);
        }
    });
});

here is Live example

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To remove disabled attribute use,

 $("#elementID").removeAttr('disabled');

and to add disabled attribute use,

$("#elementID").prop("disabled", true);

Enjoy :)

share|improve this answer

The answers above don't address don't address also checking for menu based cut/paste events. Below's the code that I use to do both. Note the action actually happens with a timeout because the cut and past events actually fire before the change happened, so timeout gives a little time for that to happen.

  $( ".your-input-item" ).bind('keyup cut paste',function() {
      var ctl = $(this);
      setTimeout(function() {
          $('.your-submit-button').prop( 'disabled', $(ctl).val() == '');
      }, 100);
  });
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