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the below class Test has a static variable count, that gets incremented while creating object of the class Test,

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template <class T> class Test
{  
private:
  T val; 
public:
  static int count;
  Test()
  {
    count++;
  }
  // some other stuff in class
};

template<class T>
int Test<T>::count = 0;

int main()
{
  Test<int> a;  
  Test<int> b;  
  Test<double> c;  
  cout << Test<int>::count   << endl;  // prints 2  
  cout << Test<double>::count << endl; //prints 1

  getchar();
  return 0;
}

output : 2 1

I guess there are two instances Test and Test (while calling Test and Test). But i want to know why there are two instances for int and double, as there are two different types?? if so how count variable is been tracked for different data types and same data types?? this might be a simple question, but i just wanna know the basic process behind it?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yes, you get one instance of:

template<class T>
int Test<T>::count = 0;

for every type of T. And of course an instantiated

  Test()
  {
    count++;
  }

Imagine that you added:

  Test()
  {
    val = 0;
    count++;
  }

You immediately see why you have to have another function for each type. And Test<int> is a different class than Test<double>.

The full name of each of the count variables are:

Test<int>::count
Test<double>::count

Which the compiler will "mangle" into something along the lines of count_Test$i_i and count_Test$D_i respectively (I just made that up, and it may well be quite different in reality)

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Since Test<int> and Test<double> are different types.

A class template defines the layout and operations for an unbounded set of related types.

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Yes. there is two separated types of Test. One is based on int : Test<int>. Another is based on double : Test<double>.

You can assume there is two Test classes :

class Test_int // Test<int>
{  
private:
  int val; 
//...

class Test_double // Test<double>
{  
private:
  double val; 
//...
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You have 2 different classes.

Each specified class template is a different class type.
So Test<int> is a class name for a class type that is different from Test<double>.

The compiler generates separate code for each of these classes, and therefor 2 different static variables.

And there's more, it will create the code for each compilation unit that includes the header (because the code will be "injected" where it is needed).

So, if you will print it in 2 different classes in 2 different .cpp files, you'll see there's a different counter for each compilation unit, even for the same templated class type.

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I like the wording in the standard, which says "class template" rather than "template class". A class template is used to create (instantiate) a class. –  dyp Apr 11 '13 at 13:23

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