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I have an array [["Company Name", "Field6"], ["Email", "Field5"]]

And from that array I am creating array of fields with values:

[
  [{:label=>"Company Name", :value=>"gfdgfd"}],
  [{:label=>"Email", :value=>"gfdgfd@gfd.pl"}]
]

using

fields = [["Company Name", "Field6"], ["Email", "Field5"]]
# first element in array is Label and second is param id
fields_with_values = fields.collect do |field| 
 [
   label: field[0],
   value: params[field[1]]
 ]
end

and then I want to pass that labels and values to erb template(something like):

# template.erb
<% fields_with_values.each do |field| %>
  l: <%= field.label %>
  v: <%= field.value %>
<% end %>

How will be the best way to collect these fields_with_values ? Maybe I should use Object.new

share|improve this question
    
What are you trying to achieve? –  gmaliar Apr 11 '13 at 13:36
    
I want to in clear, simple way render this template.erb –  regedarek Apr 11 '13 at 13:39
    
and what's wrong with that you are doing? –  gmaliar Apr 11 '13 at 13:40
2  
I'd personally avoid instantiating new Objects for this case, unless there is some business logic involved with the data which hasn't been mentioned here. –  Wizard of Ogz Apr 11 '13 at 14:09
1  
+1 Wizard. Classifying and instantiating each element is an unnecessary step whose only purpose is to facilitate the use of dot notation in the view. –  Substantial Apr 11 '13 at 14:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
fields = [["Company Name", "Field6"], ["Email", "Field5"]]
# first element in array is Label and second is param id

fields_with_values = fields.collect do |label, param_id| 
  # It looks like there is no need for a nested array here, so just return a Hash
  {
    label: label,
    value: params[param_id]
  }
end

#=> [{:label=>"Company Name", :value=>"gfdgfd"}, {:label=>"Email", :value=>"gfdgfd@gfd.pl"}]

It looks like you are trying to use dot syntax to get values out of a Ruby Hash similar to how you would use dot syntax for a JavaScript object (e.g. field.label). Unfortunately this doesn't work for Ruby. I wish it did because it looks very clean. For the Ruby Hash you must use an index, which is a symbol in this case: field[:label]. Your ERB code will look something like this:

# template.erb
<% fields_with_values.each do |field| %>
  l: <%= field[:label] %>
  v: <%= field[:value] %>
<% end %>
share|improve this answer

Convert to a hash instead.

fields = [["Company Name", "Field6"], ["Email", "Field5"]]

fields_with_values = Hash[*fields.flatten]
# => {"Company Name"=>"Field6", "Email"=>"Field5"}

In your view, parse the hash:

<% fields_with_values.each do |label, value| %>
  l: <%= label %>
  v: <%= params[value.intern] %>
<% end %>

Note that this will break if your input array is uneven, ie. a key without a value.


EDIT

As mentioned in a comment below (+1), duplicate keys will not work. Fields that have the same label as another field are no good.

share|improve this answer
1  
Nice trick of Hash[*fields.flatten] –  fotanus Apr 11 '13 at 13:58
2  
I like this! You just need to mention that it won't work with duplicate labels (Hash keys). That doesn't seem likely to be a problem in this case. –  Wizard of Ogz Apr 11 '13 at 14:03
    
One thing: value is not Field5 but params['Field5'] –  regedarek Apr 11 '13 at 14:16
    
Updated. I interned value which produces a symbol (params[:Field5]). If you want a string instead, remove .intern. –  Substantial Apr 11 '13 at 14:27
l: v:

I would do

fields_with_values = fields.collect do |field|
  {label: field[0], value: params[field[1]}
end

And in the view

<% fields_with_values.each do |field| %>
  l: <%= field[:label] %>
  v: <%= field[:value] %>
<% end %>

However, lets say label is a company and value is an e-mail. If you have a class like

class Company < SomethingOrNothing
  attr_accessible :name, email

  # methods here
end

You could do

@companies = fields.collect do |field|
  Company.new(name: field[0], email: field[1]) 
end

And then

<% @companies.each do |company| %>
  l: <%= comapny.name %>
  v: <%= company.email %>
<% end %>

However, most likely creating a new class just for that is over engineering, unless you will use this class over and over in your code.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, I understand. I will use it only in this one template. And what about using Struct for that? –  regedarek Apr 11 '13 at 14:15
    
Well, not sure about structs. Never used it myself - I usually go with hash or create a class for it. Not sure what exactly is the advantages to use a Struct. –  fotanus Apr 11 '13 at 23:27

The easy most basic way would be:

class Foo
 attr_accessors :label, :value
 def initialize (label, value)
   @label = label
   @value = value
 end
end

fields_with_values = fields.map do |field|
   Foo.new(field[0], params[field[1]])
end

from here on you can make it more Ruby way with splat operator or create the objects on the fly, etc. etc.

share|improve this answer

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