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I know this has been asked before, but the solutions I have tried never take into consideration nullable types.

I need something that will be able to handle a conversion like

List<string> to List<Int32?>, List<string> to List<int>, List<string> to List<double>

etc.

I am trying to create something as follows

private void RoutineCompleted(string category, List  Type fieldType = null)
{


//ToNewType is the extension method that I need.
var var convertedList = values.ToNewType(fieldType);

}

I have looked at the following code, but it does not do the job:

 public static IEnumerable Cast(this IEnumerable self, Type innerType)
    {
        var methodInfo = typeof(Enumerable).GetMethod("Cast");
        var genericMethod = methodInfo.MakeGenericMethod(innerType);
        return genericMethod.Invoke(null, new object[] { self }) as IEnumerable;
    }

Can anyone help me figure this out?

Thanks!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

the Convert class cannot deal with Nullable types, so I had to special-case those.

 static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var strings = new[] { "1","2","3"};
        var ints = strings.ConvertItems<string, int>().ToList();
        var doubles = strings.ConvertItems<string, double>().ToList();
        var nullableints = strings.ConvertItems<string, int?>().ToList();
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TargetType> ConvertItems<SourceType, TargetType>(this IEnumerable<SourceType> sourceCollection)
    {
        var targetType = typeof(TargetType);
        if (targetType.IsGenericType && targetType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>))
        {
            targetType = targetType.GetGenericArguments().First();
        }
        return sourceCollection.ConvertItems((source) => (TargetType)Convert.ChangeType(source, targetType));
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TargetType> ConvertItems<SourceType, TargetType>(this IEnumerable<SourceType> sourceCollection, Converter<SourceType, TargetType> convertor)
    {
        foreach (var item in sourceCollection)
        {
            yield return convertor(item);
        }
    }

EDIT: weakly-typed version, when you only know the type at runtime

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var strings = new[] { "1","2","3"};
        var ints = strings.ConvertItems(typeof(int));
        var doubles = strings.ConvertItems(typeof(double));
        var nullableints = strings.ConvertItems(typeof(int?));
        foreach (int? item in nullableints)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(item);
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable ConvertItems(this IEnumerable sourceCollection,Type targetType)
    {
        if (targetType.IsGenericType && targetType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>))
        {
            targetType = targetType.GetGenericArguments().First();
        }
        foreach (var item in sourceCollection)
        {
            yield return Convert.ChangeType(item, targetType);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Tomas. I think this is close. How do I implement the above to pass in the Type as a parameter? I don't know the Type beforehand. THANKS!! –  MrTouya Apr 11 '13 at 14:26
    
Sure, I added it in the edit. Since we do not know the type at compile time, I had to change the signature, so it returs a non-generic IEnumerable –  Tomas Grosup Apr 11 '13 at 15:03
    
Hi Tomas. Almost there!!!!! I just tried it. The only issue is that it seems to convert the nullable type into a non-nullable type. Is there any way to keep the type as nullable? Thanks again. –  MrTouya Apr 11 '13 at 15:45

You do not need an extension if you can convert using Convert.To... methods

List<string> strList = ...
List<int> intList = strList.Select(s => Convert.ToInt32(s)).ToList();

or you can use Convert.ChangeType

public static IEnumerable<TOut> ConvertTo<TIn, TOut>(this IEnumerable<TIn> list)
{
    return list.Select(o => (TOut)Convert.ChangeType(o, typeof (TOut)));
}

List<string> strList = new List<string>();
IEnumerable<int> intList = strList.ConvertTo<string, int>();
share|improve this answer
    
How do I implement this so that in takes in the Type as a parameter? For example, strList.ConvertTo(fieldType)?? –  MrTouya Apr 11 '13 at 13:58
    
What are you expecting return type should be then? Just IEnumerable? –  Mehmet Ataş Apr 11 '13 at 16:15

You can try with this:

public static IEnumerable<TTo> ChangeType<TTo, TFrom>(this IEnumerable<TFrom> self)
{
    return self.Select(e => (TTo)Convert.ChangeType(e, typeof(TTo)));
}

EDIT:

If you don't wan't to use generic's and you have to pass type: Type like this:

var list = new List<string> {"1", "3", "4", null};
var result = list.ChangeType(typeof (int?));

You can try use this:

public static IEnumerable ChangeType(this IEnumerable self, Type type)
{
   var converter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(type);
   foreach (var obj in self)
   {
       yield return converter.ConvertFrom(obj);
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Same here. I only know the type to convert to at runtime. How do I pass the type as a parameter? Thanks :-) –  MrTouya Apr 11 '13 at 14:00
    
I don't know the context of your code but is it possible that your RoutineCompleted method instead of taking Type fieldType can take type argument like this: RoutineCompleted<T>(string category, List list) ? –  Miłosz Wierzbicki Apr 11 '13 at 14:27

The conversions you're talking about are not casts per se, but type conversions.

You can do them using Linq, for example like this:

var ints = new List(){1,2,3,4,51};
var strings = array.Select(x => x.ToString());

or

var strings = new List() {"1.56","2.71","3.14"};
var doubles = strings.Select( x => Convert.ToDouble(x));

Those give you IEnumerables, but you can make them into Lists using .ToList().

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1  
It seems to me that everyone has their own personal definition of "cast". I would say that it's not a cast unless the cast operator is used. –  Eric Lippert Apr 11 '13 at 13:50
    
That's probably a better definition (who am I to challenge THE Eric Lippert?), I thought of a bunch of exceptions to mine the minute I posted it, so I removed it again. –  Rik Apr 11 '13 at 13:59
1  
What if you only know the Type at runtime??? –  MrTouya Apr 11 '13 at 14:05
    
You can use the Convert.ChangeType method mentioned in the other answers. –  Rik Apr 11 '13 at 14:07

This is a simple LINQ Select:

IEnumerable<string> values = new[] { "1", "2", "3" };
var converted = values.Select(PerformConversion);

private int? PerformConversion(string input)
{
   ...
}

You will need a different method for each conversion, or a parameterised method to encompassed all of them. For example:

private T? PerformConversion<T>(string input) where T : struct, IConvertible
{
    return (T?) Convert.ChangeType(input, typeof(T));
}
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