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I am curious which is faster in the following circumstance. I have output files of roughly 2MB, and many thousands of lines (anywhere we'll say between 15k - 50k).

I am looking for a string at the end of the file (last 10 lines) or so. I do this multiple times, sometimes with the same last 10 lines of a file, and for multiple files.

I am curious which of the following is the fastest and most efficient:

  1. tail the last 10 lines, save them as a variable. When I need to grep or check for a string, echo that variable and grep on the output
  2. Each time I need to grep something, first tail the output file then pipe and grep the output
  3. Forgo any of the above, and just grep the whole file each time.

Option 1)

if [ -f "$jobFile".out ]; then
{
  output=$(tail -n 10 "$jobFile".out)
  !((echo "$output" | grep -q "Command exited with non-zero status" ) 
    || (echo "$output" | grep -q "Error termination via Lnk1e")) 
    && continue
  {
    output "$(grep $jobID $curJobsFile)"
    sed -i "/$jobID/d" "$jobIDsWithServer"
  }
fi

Option 2)

if [ -f "$jobFile".out ]; then
{
  !((tail -n 10 "$jobFile".out | grep -q "Command exited with non-zero status" ) 
    || (tail -n 10 "$jobFile".out | grep -q "Error termination via Lnk1e")) 
    && continue
  {
    output "$(grep $jobID $curJobsFile)"
    sed -i "/$jobID/d" "$jobIDsWithServer"
  }
fi

Option 3)

if [ -f "$jobFile".out ]; then
{
  !((grep -q "Command exited with non-zero status" "$jobFile".out) 
    || (grep -q "Error termination via Lnk1e" "$jobFile".out)) 
    && continue
  {
    output "$(grep $jobID $curJobsFile)"
    sed -i "/$jobID/d" "$jobIDsWithServer"
  }
fi
share|improve this question
5  
Linux has a time command for timing how long it takes a command to run. I bet you could use it here. –  Corey Ogburn Apr 11 '13 at 13:34
    
You can also use something like strace to see what IO operations are being called for each option. –  Aya Apr 11 '13 at 13:44
    
What's with all the braces and parentheses? Not only are they not (all) required in this circumstance, they can clearly be error-prone (you appear to have a missing close brace). –  glenn jackman Apr 11 '13 at 21:48
    
@glennjackman it was a partial copy/partial rewrite from what's in my script. Whether braces are needed or not, it helps improve readability for me at least. Certainly for an if block, it helps set it off from everything else. You are correct though, I am missing one in this typed example, not in my actual script though. –  J M Apr 11 '13 at 21:54
    
OK, but be aware that braces and parentheses are different: parentheses actually spawn a sub-shell, while braces execute in the current shell. So this ((echo foo) && (echo bar)) actually has to do the work of spawning 3 other shells. –  glenn jackman Apr 11 '13 at 22:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Option 2 is using tail twice, so will probably be slightly slower than 1. Both will be a lot quicker than option 3.

Another thing you can do is:

if [ -f "$jobFile".out ]; then
{
  !(tac "$jobFile".out | 
    grep -E -m1 -q "(Command exited with non-zero status|Error termination via Lnk1e)")
    && continue
  {
    output "$(grep $jobID $curJobsFile)"
    sed -i "/$jobID/d" "$jobIDsWithServer"
  }
fi

This will output the file in reverse order and grep will stop after the first match. Also it will search for both search terms at the same time, saving you from having to grep twice if it is not matched with the first term.

share|improve this answer
1  
Don't think 2 will be quicker, look at OP's code again. Same tail -n 10 is being used twice. –  anubhava Apr 11 '13 at 13:44
    
Thanks for pointing that out, I'll adjust the answer –  Lee Netherton Apr 11 '13 at 13:47

Why not something like this:

if tail -f "$jobfile.out" \ 
    | grep -F -e "Command exited with non-zero status" -e "Error termination via Lnk1e"
then
   output "$(grep $jobID $curJobsFile)"
   sed -i "/$jobID/d" "$jobIDsWithServer"
fi

This way, you're greping the output of the tail in realtime until you find what you're looking for.

Using the -F flag in grep makes it much faster when you're not using regular expressions.

share|improve this answer
    
Did not know about the -F flag! –  J M Apr 11 '13 at 14:49

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