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This is a style question for C and C++. Do you prefer

void f() {
  const char * x = g();
  if (x == NULL) {
    //process error
  }
  // continue function
}

or this:

void f() {
  const char * x = g();
  if (! x) {
    //process error
  }
  // continue function
}

? The former is much clearer, but the latter is less verbose.

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closed as not constructive by Andy Prowl, juanchopanza, ecatmur, Hasturkun, Bo Persson Apr 11 '13 at 14:02

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7  
In C++11, the first example should be replaced by if (x == nullptr) –  Andy Prowl Apr 11 '13 at 13:58
3  
in c++, the latter is preferred, but you shouldn't be using raw pointers in C++ in the first place –  user814628 Apr 11 '13 at 13:58
1  
Do whatever your team does. Or not. I would expect no one to have trouble reading code with either of those. If I was doing a code review I would wonder why the function is returning a null pointer in the first place, or why it is returning a pointer a character at all but never question the null check itself. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 11 '13 at 14:00
2  
The former is much clearer only if you are not familiar with the latter. –  Pete Becker Apr 11 '13 at 14:01
    
At our company you are encouraged to use the former and remove the latter. –  Bryan Olivier Apr 11 '13 at 14:04

1 Answer 1

It mainly depends on the adopted convention within your group of work.

As the != NULL form may be clearer to a developer who is used to it, the inverse is also true for developers who were used to check a NULL value using the boolean form.

As @Andy Prowl mentioned it, a much clearer version of this appeard in C++11 by the use of the nullptr type : if (x == nullptr). This notation should be used as a convention by every members of a team if you are writing C++11 application.

Finally, there exists different patterns that are pretty much used such as the Null Object Pattern that avoids making this check everywhere in your code, in case this check involves a specific habit of your application.

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