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Could someone expand the spectrum of the samples of boxing and performance in .NET?

This sample is clear for me, but are there other cases?

Code optimization flow

BAD CODE

void CountVer1(int max)
{
    for (int i = 1; i <= max; i++)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("{0} out of {1}",
            i, max);
    }
}

GOOD CODE

void CountVer2(int max)
{
    object maxObj = max;
    for (int i = 1; i <= max; i++)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("{0} out of {1}",
            i, maxObj);
    }
}

IDEAL CODE

void CountVer3(int max)
{
    for (int i = 1; i <= max; i++)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("{0} out of {1}",
            i.ToString(), max.ToString());
    }
}
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closed as not a real question by Adam Houldsworth, Ash Burlaczenko, Servy, gnat, Moo-Juice Apr 11 '13 at 14:40

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
I was under the impression that in the first example, WriteLine() would just called ToString() on i and max anyway making it the same as the third example. Is that not the case? –  Ash Burlaczenko Apr 11 '13 at 14:02
2  
The cost of the IO is going to outweigh the cost of the boxing by quite a bit. This is not a context in which boxing matters. The primary issue with boxing comes up when designing an API; you'll want to rely on generics to not box structs when passed to your methods. –  Servy Apr 11 '13 at 14:09
2  
@Peretz No, it's not "shit". You seem to think that boxing is really expensive. It is not particularly expensive. In this context it will account for a very small difference, certainly not something that's even worth thinking about for a 10 iteration loop. When dealing with code that will execute a few tens of millions of times, doing multiple boxing operations per iteration, then perhaps it's a problem. In this code though, it's certainly a micro-optimization. –  Servy Apr 11 '13 at 14:19
2  
Console.WriteLine is much more expensive than boxing. I'd prefer the first code of your three examples since it's the cleanest code. To justify your other code variants you need to show the output of a profiler that shows that 1) This code is performance critical in the first place 2) Calling .ToString() manually is a significant performance hit. Without that evidence, it's just premature optimization. –  CodesInChaos Apr 11 '13 at 14:21
3  
@Peretz It makes perfect sense. The only example of boxing you'll ever get is when someone tries to put a value type into a reference type. There are times when people don't seem to think it happens, like Enum.HasFlags for example, but the situation is always the same. If you spot a value type being put into a reference type argument or variable, it's boxed. Performance is entirely subjective. The CLR is very good at creating objects (ie, fast), and boxed items tend to be short lived, but usage dictates the effect of that. Good luck. –  Adam Houldsworth Apr 11 '13 at 14:30
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Boxing is considered slow because it implies the allocation of an object. In your case that object is short lived (will probably not survive Gen0), which makes it cheap. A recent microbenchmark I did put the cost of generating a short lived object at about ~15 CPU cycles. Cost might be a bit higher in real applications, but that boxing isn't that expensive.

You should avoid allocations in performance critical code. But that means code that's called >10 million times per second.

If you benchmark your above code, you'll see that Console.WriteLine is the expensive part, and that optimizing out those two boxes has negligible impact.

When optimizing a program's performance, I'd:

  1. Profile to identify the bottleneck. But 99% of the code performance isn't an issue
  2. Rewrite it to your hopefully better version
  3. Profile it again, and verify that the performance improvement is significant. If it is not, revert to the simpler code, or try another variation.
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