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I am developing a simple parallel application using MPI that involves the loading of a file to memory. That file is exported via NFS to the nodes of the computer cluster. I've noticed that in some cases the performance of NFS drops significantly with thousands of additional TCP packets being trasmitted from the server to the clients and i've pinpointed the problem to the use of fseek() in the code:

//Seek to data and load them to array
fseek ( fp, ( unsigned int ) dec_number + start, SEEK_SET );

for ( i = 0; i < n * mpi_n; i++ ) {
    if ( ! feof ( fp ) )
        text[i] = fgetc ( fp );

    if ( i > 0 && n > mpi_n && i % mpi_n == 0 )
        fseek ( fp, n - mpi_n, SEEK_CUR );
}
fclose ( fp );

Since the same code without the fseek() works without problems, is it possible that the server actually resends parts of the file after each fseek() ? How can this performance be improved?

Time with cold NFS cache, without fseek(): ~4 sec
Time with hot NFS cache, without fseek(): ~3 sec
Time with cold NFS cache, with fseek(): ~12 sec
Time with hot NFS cache, with fseek(): ~3 sec

Snapshot of nfswatch with a cluster of 10 nodes, a 300MB file with cold NFS cache and with fseek():

Total packets:
1903459 (network)   544803 (to host)        0 (dropped)

Packet counters:
NFS3 Read:                  116290      21%
NFS3 Write:                     10       0%
NFS Read:                        0       0%
NFS Write:                       0       0%
NFS Mount:                       0       0%
Port Mapper:                     0       0%
RPC Authorization:              29       0%
Other RPC Packets:               0       0%

TCP Packets:                544386     100%
UDP Packets:                    17       0%
ICMP Packets:                    0       0%
Routing Control:                 0       0%
Address Resolution:              0       0%
Reverse Addr Resol:              0       0%
Ethernet Broadcast:              0       0%
Other Packets:                  49       0%

Snapshot of nfswatch with a cluster of 10 nodes, a 2GB file with cold NFS cache and without fseek():

Total packets:
251804 (network)   102650 (to host)        0 (dropped)

Packet counters:
NFS3 Read:                   37039      36%
NFS3 Write:                      1       0%
NFS Read:                        0       0%
NFS Write:                       0       0%
NFS Mount:                       0       0%
Port Mapper:                     0       0%
RPC Authorization:               2       0%
Other RPC Packets:               0       0%

TCP Packets:                102543     100%
UDP Packets:                    30       0%
ICMP Packets:                    1       0%
Routing Control:                 0       0%
Address Resolution:              0       0%
Reverse Addr Resol:              0       0%
Ethernet Broadcast:              0       0%
Other Packets:                  41       0%

The clients are mounted using the following mount command:

/nfs on /nfs type nfs (rw,rsize=8192,wsize=8192,timeo=14,intr)

share|improve this question
    
Without the fseek() your code presumably behaves differently - can you pinpoint this to fseek() ? It might help if you identify the platform you're on (e.g. there was a slight fseek() degradation in RHEL 5, not remedied until a kernel update somewhere in RHEL 5.7) –  nos Apr 11 '13 at 14:18
    
I've seen the comments on the RHEL problem. The cluster has a homogeneous setup with Ubuntu 12.04.2 installed on both the server and the clients –  charis Apr 11 '13 at 14:20
    
You're reading a byte and then seeking which is a pathologically bad pattern (fseek tends to cause buffer flushing). Mount with noatime. Swap to open & read & lseek (or open, mmap and pure pointer access). –  Petesh Apr 11 '13 at 14:50
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