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Can this be cleaned up?

using System;  
class AscendingBubbleSort 
{     
    public static void Main()
    {
        int i = 0,j = 0,t = 0;
        int []c=new int[20];
        for(i=0;i<20;i++)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Enter Value p[{0}]:", i);
            c[i]=int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
        }
        // Sorting: Bubble Sort
        for(i=0;i<20;i++)
        {
            for(j=i+1;j<20;j++)
            {
                if(c[i]>c[j])
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("c[{0}]={1}, c[{2}]={3}", i, c[i], j, c[j]);
                    t=c[i];
                    c[i]=c[j];
                    c[j]=t;
                }
            }
        }
        Console.WriteLine("bubble sorted array:");
        // sorted array output
        for(i=0;i<20;i++)
        {
            Console.WriteLine ("c[{0}]={1}", i, c[i]);
        }
    }
}
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35  
Elegant and Bubble Sort do not belong in the same sentence, IMHO. –  Sinan Ünür Oct 20 '09 at 15:01
11  
If this is a homework assignment, I would make the code as ugly as possible and litter it with comments like "deliberately adding yuckiness to code as a reflection of my distaste for this algorithm"... the teacher will respect you for your principles. –  Dan Tao Oct 20 '09 at 15:03
8  
That's not bubble sort... –  Jon Skeet Oct 20 '09 at 15:04
4  
@Ian: There's value in learning how to translate an algorithm description into code though... –  Jon Skeet Oct 20 '09 at 15:18
2  
@Ian: I think the fact that most discussions of sorting place mention bubble sort suggests it is quite relevant, if only towards a discussion of sorting. The fact that it's not generally appropriate in a commercial environment does not imply it is not worthy of discussion. –  Brian Oct 20 '09 at 15:22
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10 Answers

up vote 31 down vote accepted

What you've pasted there isn't a bubble sort. It's a sort of "brute force" sort but it's not bubble sort. Here's an example of a generic bubble sort. It uses an arbitrary comparer, but lets you omit it in which case the default comparer is used for the relevant type. It will sort any (non-readonly) implementation of IList<T>, which includes arrays. Read the above link (to Wikipedia) to get more of an idea of how bubble sort is meant to work. Note how on each loop we go through from start to finish, but only compare each item with its neighbour. It's still an O(n2) sort algorithm, but in many cases it will be quicker than the version you've given.

public void BubbleSort<T>(IList<T> list);
{
    BubbleSort<T>(list, Comparer<T>.Default);
}

public void BubbleSort<T>(IList<T> list, IComparer<T> comparer)
{
    bool stillGoing = true;
    while (stillGoing)
    {
        stillGoing = false;
        for (int i = 0; i < list.Length-1; i++)
        {
            T x = list[i];
            T y = list[i + 1];
            if (comparer.Compare(x, y) > 0)
            {
                list[i] = y;
                list[i + 1] = x;
                stillGoing = true;
            }
        }
    }
}
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6  
but you have not make the student think and come up with his own answer... –  Ian Ringrose Oct 20 '09 at 15:11
6  
@Ian: Not everyone who comes here is working on homework. With this answer, they'll find what they're looking for and can move on to the next problem. :) –  280Z28 Oct 20 '09 at 17:26
2  
I am (seriously) confused why you think this is a 'more real' bubble sort than the original. Both are bubbling, with different optimizations. Your version neglects to shrink the range. –  Henk Holterman Oct 20 '09 at 17:48
2  
@Henk: Take a look at the wikipedia article. Does the algorithm described there look anything like the original? In particular, the OP's code compares arbitrary pairs, immediately going against the "comparing each pair of adjacent items" part of the description of the algorithm. It's certainly a brute force swapping sort, but it's not a bubble sort. –  Jon Skeet Oct 20 '09 at 18:08
1  
Jon, you're right, i misread the if(c[i]>c[j]) part. I've seen similar loops doing if(c[j]>c[j+1]) and that's bubbling. –  Henk Holterman Oct 20 '09 at 18:26
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The most elegant way to sort in C# is

Array.Sort( object[] )

That will work everywhere except in homework problems where the teacher asked you to implement the non-elegant bubble sort algorithm. ;-)

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2  
That's good advice, but it doesn't answer the OP's question. –  bcat Oct 20 '09 at 18:19
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Overall, there's nothing wrong with your bubble sort implementation. If I were doing a real code review, I'd make the following changes:

Choose more descriptive variable names

Why is your array just called c?

Minimize variable scope

All of your variables are declared at the top of the function. Unless this is a homework requirement or a coding standard, its more idiomatic to declare variables "close" to the location where they are used, preferably so they have the smallest amount of scope possible.

So, eliminate the first line which reads int i = 0,j = 0,t = 0;. Declare loop counters inline:

for(int i = 0; i < 20; i++)

And declare your temp variable in the place where its used:

                Console.WriteLine("c[{0}]={1}, c[{2}]={3}", i, c[i], j, c[j]);
                int t=c[i];
                c[i]=c[j];
                c[j]=t;

Eliminate hard-coded array bounds.

This:

for(i=0;i<20;i++)

Becomes this:

for(i = 0; i < c.Length; i++)
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1  
Excellent suggestions –  Greg Oct 20 '09 at 15:12
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Most people would not bother making a bubble sort elegant. In general, though, I find that doing this:

for (int i = 0; i < items.Length; i++) {
    Item item = items[i];
    // do something with item
}

is both more elegant and more maintainable than doing this:

Item item;
int i;
for (i = 0; i < items.Length; i++) {
    item = items[i];
    // do something with item
}

In other words, declare your variables within the smallest applicable scope. Otherwise you might find yourself doing something with i or item at some other point in the code and then using them again where you shouldn't be.

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  • I would use a swap methed to swap the two array items. (details of how to write swap method left as homework!)

  • You should think about the case when the items are already in order

  • You should read up on Insertion sort for more marks :-)

  • Rather then reading the test data from the keyboard, see if you can learn how to use nUnit

share|improve this answer
    
Ian, I voted this up because your point about the swap method is valid. Just FYI though, someone added the homework tag, but I asked this to make a point at work. –  Kaiser Advisor Oct 20 '09 at 18:22
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I personally prefer this:

string foo [] = new string[] {"abc", "def", "aaa", "feaf", "afea" };
Array.Sort(foo);

But that's just me. Sort is a solved problem, why reinvent the wheel?

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4  
Look at the "homework" tag. ;) –  Maximilian Mayerl Oct 20 '09 at 15:00
    
That wasn't there when I wrote this answer. But yeah, it's prolly homework. –  Randolpho Oct 20 '09 at 15:04
1  
And, this is actually wrong. If you look at the MS documentation, Array.Sort uses a QuickSort not a BubbleSort :) –  BFree Oct 20 '09 at 15:04
    
Does it matter? The point is that it sorts. –  Randolpho Oct 20 '09 at 15:24
    
It does matter when the question is specifically asking about bubble sort. –  bcat Oct 20 '09 at 18:20
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int[] array = {4,5,7,1,8};           

int n1, n2;
bool stillgoing = true;

while (stillgoing)
{
    stillgoing = false;
    for (int i = 0; i < (array.Length-1); i++)
    {                  
        if (array[i] > array[i + 1])
        {
            n1 = array[i + 1];
            n2 = array[i];

            array[i] = n1;
            array[i + 1] = n2;
            stillgoing = true; 
        }
    }
}
for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine(array[i]);
}

Took some ideas from Jon skeet...

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That's simple and to the point... +1 for that :) –  dotNetSoldier Mar 5 '13 at 9:59
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    public int[] BubbleSortInAesc(int[] input)
    {
        for (int i = input.Length; i > 0; i--)
        {
            for (int j = 0; j < i-1; j++)
            {
                if (input[j] > input[j + 1])
                {
                    //Swap the numbers
                    input[j] = input[j + 1]+input[j];
                    input[j + 1] = input[j] - input[j + 1];
                    input[j] = input[j] - input[j + 1];
                }
            }
        }
        return input;
    }
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I think your algorithm in ok, but I would put the sort functionality in a seperate class and method.

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I believe there is an improvement in the answer proposed by Jon Skeet. After each loop, the number of iterations should exclude the last item processed in the previous iteration. So, here's the code:

public void BubbleSortImproved<T>(IList<T> list)
{
    BubbleSortImproved<T>(list, Comparer<T>.Default);
}

public void BubbleSortImproved<T>(IList<T> list, IComparer<T> comparer)
{
    bool stillGoing = true;
    int k = 0;
    while (stillGoing)
    {
        stillGoing = false;
        //reduce the iterations number after each loop
        for (int i = 0; i < list.Count - 1 - k; i++)
        {
            T x = list[i];
            T y = list[i + 1];
            if (comparer.Compare(x, y) > 0)
            {
                list[i] = y;
                list[i + 1] = x;
                stillGoing = true;
            }
        }
        k++;
    }
}
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