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I was originally puzzled by this: I was just working on a character splitting function in Perl, when I noticed this:

  DB<56> map(print("-", $_, "\n"), split( //, "test")  );
-t
-e
-s
-t

  DB<57> map(print("-", $_, "\n"), split( /./, "test")  );

  DB<58> map(print("-", $_, "\n"), split( /(.)/, "test")  );
-
-t
-
-e
-
-s
-
-t

I already knew that if the empty regex // is used, the string is split into individual characters; but I wasn't clear on where did those empty strings in the /(.)/ regex come from - but just a few sentences later, the page states "If the regex has groupings, then the list produced contains the matched substrings from the groupings as well ... Since the first character of $x matched the regex, split prepended an empty initial element to the list." So, it's expected behavior. (althgouh, I'm still not clear why ungrouped dot /./ doesn't do anything )

But, I was also working in Python, and encountered a similar problem (empty strings in result of split) - and there I found a filter(None, list) function, which in this invocation, simply removes empty strings from a list. What is used to achieve the same in Perl?

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2  
You'll see a better picture if you pass -1 for split's third arg. –  ikegami Apr 11 '13 at 15:26
3  
Using map as a foreach loop is frowned upon. Aside from the small inefficiencies, it promises one thing to the reader but does another. (print "-$_\n" for split ...;) –  ikegami Apr 11 '13 at 15:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The first argument of split defines what separates the terms of the list you are parsing. In your last two snippets, you tell split that any character is a valid separator, so split returns what's between the characters of the input: Five empty strings.

>perl -E"say qq{<$_>} for split /./, 'test', -1;"
<>
<>
<>
<>
<>

(Trailing empty strings are filtered out by default.)

The solution is not to start filtering out the very thing you asked split to produce. Either fix your separator

my @chars = split /(?<=.)|(?=.)/s;
my @chars = split //;

or use a better tool

my @chars = /(.)/s;
my @chars = unpack '(a)*', $_;
share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks for that, @ikegami - and sorry for the late accept; however, if in principle (with a different regex) I get an array with empty strings which I'd like to filter, now would I do that (like Python's filter(None, list))? I've heard @arr = grep { defined } @arr; should work, but I just tried it, and it still leaves empty strings... –  sdaau Jul 16 '14 at 2:56
    
Ah, found it via How to ignore any empty values in a perl grep?: it should be @arr = grep { not /^\s*$/ } @arr; - that filters out empty strings. Cheers! –  sdaau Jul 16 '14 at 3:02
    
grep { !length } @arr –  ikegami Jul 16 '14 at 3:16

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