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open(INFILE1,"INPUT.txt");

my $modfile = 'Data.txt';
open MODIFIED,'>',$modfile or die "Could not open $modfile : $!";   

for (;;) {
    my $line1 = <INFILE1>;
    last if not defined $line1;

    my $line2 = <INFILE1>;
    last if not defined $line2;

    my ($tablename1, $colname1,$sql1) = split(/\t/, $line1);
    my ($tablename2, $colname2,$sql2) = split(/\t/, $line2);

    if ($tablename1 eq $tablename2)
    {
        my $sth1 = $dbh->prepare($sql1);
        $sth1->execute;
        my $hash_ref1 = $sth1->fetchall_hashref('KEY');

        my $sth2 = $dbh->prepare($sql2);
        $sth2->execute;
        my $hash_ref2 = $sth2->fetchall_hashref('KEY');

        my @fieldname = split(/,/, $colname1);
        my $colcnt=0;
        my $rowcnt=0;
        foreach $key1 ( keys(%{$hash_ref1}) ) 
        {

            foreach (@fieldname)
            { 
                $colname =$_;

                my $strvalue1='';
                @val1 = $hash_ref1->{$key1}->{$colname};

                if (defined @val1)
                {
                    my @filtered = grep /@val1/, @metadata;
                    my $strvalue1 = substr(@filtered[0],index(@filtered[0],'||') + 2);
                }

                my $strvalue2='';
                @val2 = $hash_ref2->{$key1}->{$colname};
                if (defined @val2)
                {
                    my @filtered = grep /@val2/, @metadata2;
                    my $strvalue2 = substr(@filtered[0],index(@filtered[0],'||') + 2);
                }                   

                if ($strvalue1 ne $strvalue2 )
                { 
                    $colcnt = $colcnt + 1;
                    print MODIFIED "$tablename1\t$colname\t$strvalue1\t$strvalue2\n";
                }
            }
        }
        if ($colcnt>0) 
        {   
            print "modified count is $colcnt\n";
        }   

        %$hash_ref1 = ();
        %$hash_ref2 = ();

    }

The program is Read input file in which every line contrain three strings seperated by tab. First is TableName, Second is ALL Column Name with commas in between and third contain the sql to be run. As this utlity is doing comparison of data, so there are two rows for every tablename. One for each DB. So data needs to be picked from each respective db's and then compared column by column.

SQL returns as ID in the result set and if the value is coming from db then it needs be translated to a string by reading from a array (that array contains 100K records with Key and value seperated by ||)
Now I ran this for one set of tables which contains 18K records in each db. There are 8 columns picked from db in each sql. So for every record out of 18K, and then for every field in that record i.e. 8, this script is taking a lot of time.

My question is if someone can look and see if it can be imporoved so that it takes less time. File contents sample

INPUT.TXT      
TABLENAME   COL1,COL2   select COL1,COL2 from TABLENAME where ......    
TABLENAMEB  COL1,COL2   select COL1,COL2 from TABLENAMEB where ......    

Metadata array contains something like this(there are two i.e. for each db)

111||Code 1    
222||Code 2    

Please suggest

share|improve this question
1  
Did you run it through a profiler (like Devel::NYTProf or Devel::DProf) and eliminate the possibility that the delay is in the SQL executions? –  imran Apr 11 '13 at 15:58
1  
Usually prepare inside a loop is a bad thing. Are you sure you can not prepare all your queries outside the loop and just execute them later with different params? –  gangabass Apr 11 '13 at 16:00
    
Are the queries always returning the same set of columns? What are you actually comparing? The code is messy, but can you verbalize what you are looking for? E.g. I want a list of all rows that are in TABLENAME but not in TABLENAMEB or something like that? –  Sinan Ünür Apr 11 '13 at 16:12
    
Requirement a) Column by Column Comparison for set of tables of two diff dbs b) Set of sqls created by other progroams so the sql generated are stored in file. c) Layout of every table in both db is same. d) Column values are always ids from each db but cannot be compared as ids in both db are different so array is used.Regarding the prepare inside a loop, that is the only way as every table has diff column which are to be compared. So looping is required. Also, I will try using profiler. But i put so many print statements while testing and can confirm that sqls are not taking much time. –  user2223335 Apr 11 '13 at 16:23
    
Are there really two different databases? Or, just two tables in the same database? –  Sinan Ünür Apr 11 '13 at 16:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your code does look a bit unusual, and could gain clarity from using subroutines vs. just using loops and conditionals. Here are a few other suggestions.


The excerpt

for (;;) {
  my $line1 = <INFILE1>;    
  last if not defined $line1;    
  my $line2 = <INFILE1>;    
  last if not defined $line2;  
  ...;
}

is overly complicated: Not everyone knows the C-ish for(;;) idiom. You have lots of code duplication. And aren't you actually saying loop while I can read two lines?

while (defined(my $line1 = <INFILE1>) and defined(my $line2 = <INFILE1>)) {
  ...;
}

Yes, that line is longer, but I think it's a bit more self-documenting.


Instead of doing

if ($tablename1 eq $tablename2) { the rest of the loop }

you could say

next if $tablename1 eq $tablename2;
the rest of the loop;

and save a level of intendation. And better intendation equals better readability makes it easier to write good code. And better code might perform better.


What are you doing at foreach $key1 (keys ...) — something tells me you didn't use strict! (Just a hint: lexical variables with my can perform slightly better than global variables)

Also, doing $colname = $_ inside a for-loop is a dumb thing, for the same reason.

for my $key1 (keys ...) {
  ...;
  for my $colname (@fieldname) { ... }
}

my $strvalue1='';
@val1 = $hash_ref1->{$key1}->{$colname};

if (defined @val1)
{
  my @filtered = grep /@val1/, @metadata;
  my $strvalue1 = substr(@filtered[0],index(@filtered[0],'||') + 2);
}

I don't think this does what you think it does.

From the $hash_ref1 you retrive a single element, then assign that element to an array (a collection of multiple values).

Then you called defined on this array. An array cannot be undefined, and what you are doing is quite deprecated. Calling defined function on a collection returns info about the memory management, but does not indicate ① whether the array is empty or ② whether the first element in that array is defined.

Interpolating an array into a regex isn't likely to be useful: The elements of the array are joined with the value of $", usually a whitespace, and the resulting string treated as a regex. This will wreak havoc if there are metacharacters present.

When you only need the first value of a list, you can force list context, but assign to a single scalar like

my ($filtered) = produce_a_list;

This frees you from weird subscripts you don't need and that only slow you down.

Then you assign to a $strvalue1 variable you just declared. This shadows the outer $strvalue1. They are not the same variable. So after the if branch, you still have the empty string in $strvalue1.

I would write this code like

my $val1 = $hash_ref1->{$key1}{$colname};

my $strvalue1 = defined $val1
  ? do {
    my ($filtered) = grep /\Q$val1/, @metadata;
    substr $filtered, 2 + index $filtered, '||'
  } : '';

But this would be even cheaper if you pre-split @metadata into pairs and test for equality with the correct field. This would remove some of the bugs that are still lurking in that code.


$x = $x + 1 is commonly written $x++.


Emptying the hashrefs at the end of the iteration is unneccessary: The hashrefs are assigned to a new value at the next iteration of the loop. Also, it is unneccessary to assist Perls garbage collection for such simple tasks.


About the metadata: 100K records is a lot, so either put it in a database itself, or at the very least a hash. Especially for so many records, using a hash is a lot faster than looping through all entries and using slow regexes … aargh!

  1. Create the hash from the file, once at the beginning of the program

    my %metadata;
    while (<METADATA>) {
       chomp;
       my ($key, $value) = split /\|\|/;
       $metadata{$key} = $value; # assumes each key only has one value
    }
    
  2. Simply look up the key inside the loop

    my $strvalue1 = defined $val1 ? $metadata{$val1} // '' : ''
    

That should be so much faster.

(Oh, and please consider using better names for variables. $strvalue1 doesn't tell me anything, except that it is a stringy value (d'oh). $val1 is even worse.)

share|improve this answer

This is not really an answer but it won't really fit well in a comment either so, until you provide some more information, here are some observations.

Inside you inner for loop, there is:

@val1 = $hash_ref1->{$key1}->{$colname};

Did you mean @val1 = @{ $hash_ref1->{$key1}->{$colname} };?

Later, you check if (defined @val1)? What did you really want to check? As perldoc -f defined points out:

Use of "defined" on aggregates (hashes and arrays) is deprecated. It used to report whether memory for that aggregate had ever been allocated. This behavior may disappear in future versions of Perl. You should instead use a simple test for size:

In your case, if (defined @val1) will always be true.

Then, you have my @filtered = grep /@val1/, @metadata; Where did @metadata come from? What did you actually intend to check?

Then you have my $strvalue1 = substr(@filtered[0],index(@filtered[0],'||') + 2);

There is some interesting stuff going on in there.

You will need to verbalize what you are actually trying to do.

I strongly suspect there is a single SQL query you can run that will give you what you want but we first need to know what you want.

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