Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am new to advanced mysql queries so please be nice here...

Lets assume I have the following tables...

Table Name: users

username   other_non_relevant_field
========   ========================
Bob        blah blah blah
Steve      blah blah blah
Adam       blah blah blah



Table Name: table_1

username    field_abc    field_def    other_non_relevant_field
========    =========    =========    ========================
Steve       quick        brown        blah blah blah
Adam        fox          quick        blah blah blah



Table Name: table_2

username    field_ghi    field_jkl    other_non_relevant_field
========    =========    =========    ========================
Bob         fox          fox          blah blah blah
Bob         brown        quick        blah blah blah
Steve       fox          lazy         blah blah blah
Adam        jump         dog          blah blah blah

So lets assume I want to return a list of all the users that have records containing the words "quick" OR "brown" regardless of what table or field they are in and display the results according to relevancy. To do so, I use this query:

SELECT users.username, table_1.field_abc, table_1.field_def,
    table_2.field_ghi, table_2.field_jkl
FROM users
JOIN table_1 ON ( table_1.username=users.username )
JOIN table_2 ON ( table_2.username=users.username )
WHERE
    table_1.field_abc LIKE "%quick%" OR table_1.field_abc LIKE "%brown%"
    OR
    table_1.field_def LIKE "%quick%" OR table_1.field_def LIKE "%brown%"
    OR
    table_2.field_ghi LIKE "%quick%" OR table_2.field_ghi LIKE "%brown%"
    OR
    table_2.field_jkl LIKE "%quick%" OR table_2.field_jkl LIKE "%brown%"
ORDER BY (
    (
        CASE WHEN table_1.field_abc LIKE "%quick%"
        THEN 1
        ELSE 0
        END
    ) + (
        CASE WHEN table_1.field_abc LIKE "%brown%"
        THEN 1
        ELSE 0
        END
    ) + (
        CASE WHEN table_1.field_def LIKE "%quick%"
        THEN 1
        ELSE 0
        END
    ) + (
        CASE WHEN table_1.field_def LIKE "%brown%"
        THEN 1
        ELSE 0
        END
    ) + (
        CASE WHEN table_2.field_ghi LIKE "%quick%"
        THEN 1
        ELSE 0
        END
    ) + (
        CASE WHEN table_2.field_ghi LIKE "%brown%"
        THEN 1
        ELSE 0
        END
    ) + (
        CASE WHEN table_2.field_jkl LIKE "%quick%"
        THEN 1
        ELSE 0
        END
    ) + (
        CASE WHEN table_2.field_jkl LIKE "%brown%"
        THEN 1
        ELSE 0
        END
    )
) DESC;

I now have a few issues...

1) The query seems quite long. Is there an easier way to do it?

2) How do I make the LIKE case insensitive so %qUiCk% would still return results?

3) Currently every relevant record is returned; however, I actually want only one result per user but the highest relevant user listed first. How do I do that?

share|improve this question
    
Re: Question #2... Are searches case insensitive by default? –  G-J Apr 11 '13 at 16:13
    
Yes, they normally are in MySQL. See my answer below. –  Ross Smith II Apr 11 '13 at 16:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To answer question 1), you can replace

LIKE '%a%' OR LIKE '%b%'

with

REGEXP '(a|b)'

Second, a REGEXP b returns 1 if true, or 0 if false, so you can remove the CASEs in the ORDER BY. Try this:

SELECT users.username, table_1.field_abc, table_1.field_def,
    table_2.field_ghi, table_2.field_jkl
FROM users
JOIN table_1 ON table_1.username = users.username
JOIN table_2 ON table_2.username = users.username
WHERE
    table_1.field_abc REGEXP "(quick|brown)" OR
    table_1.field_def REGEXP "(quick|brown)" OR
    table_2.field_ghi REGEXP "(quick|brown)" OR
    table_2.field_jkl REGEXP "(quick|brown)"
ORDER BY (
    (table_1.field_abc REGEXP "(quick|brown)") +
    (table_1.field_def REGEXP "(quick|brown)") +
    (table_2.field_ghi REGEXP "(quick|brown)") +
    (table_2.field_jkl REGEXP "(quick|brown)")
) DESC;

To answer question 2). LIKE and REGEXP and even = are case-insensitive in MySQL by default, for CHAR, VARCHAR and TEXT fields. To perform case-sensitive searches you would either need to:

  1. Add the BINARY keyword. For example: REGEXP BINARY '(a|b)'

  2. Change the field type to BINARY or VARBINARY, or BLOB

  3. Change the character collation of the field you are searching to a case-sensitive one.

To answer question 3), you would need to add a GROUP BY clause, something like:

SELECT users.username, SUM(
    (table_1.field_abc REGEXP "(quick|brown)") +
    (table_1.field_def REGEXP "(quick|brown)") +
    (table_2.field_ghi REGEXP "(quick|brown)") +
    (table_2.field_jkl REGEXP "(quick|brown)")
) hits,
    table_1.field_abc, table_1.field_def,
    table_2.field_ghi, table_2.field_jkl
FROM users
JOIN table_1 ON table_1.username = users.username
JOIN table_2 ON table_2.username = users.username
WHERE
    table_1.field_abc REGEXP "(quick|brown)" OR
    table_1.field_def REGEXP "(quick|brown)" OR
    table_2.field_ghi REGEXP "(quick|brown)" OR
    table_2.field_jkl REGEXP "(quick|brown)"
GROUP BY
    users.username
ORDER BY (
    (table_1.field_abc REGEXP "(quick|brown)") +
    (table_1.field_def REGEXP "(quick|brown)") +
    (table_2.field_ghi REGEXP "(quick|brown)") +
    (table_2.field_jkl REGEXP "(quick|brown)")
) DESC;
share|improve this answer
    
I think I follow what is going on in your answer to question 3; however, I am unsure what the hits, at the end of the SUM() is for. Does it have something to do with the SUM()? –  G-J Apr 11 '13 at 17:06
    
What am I missing? Take a look at sqlfiddle.com/#!2/9c273/1 as I put your code there. sqlFiddle Link –  G-J Apr 11 '13 at 17:42
    
Sorry, the REGEXPs need parentheses. See sqlfiddle.com/#!2/9c273/21/0 –  Ross Smith II Apr 11 '13 at 18:20
    
Ok... Looks good... Thanks! –  G-J Apr 11 '13 at 18:36
    
Just realized there is a problem using REGEXP With the table data I gave you it works fine but in my real data it is possible to have "quick" and "brown" in the same field of the same record as in "quick brown". REGEXP as shown will only give a value of 1 instead of 2 in that case. I will either have to change it to REGEXP "quick" and REGEXP "brown or I will have to use the CASE as I originally did. I only noticed when I started using my real data. –  G-J Apr 11 '13 at 18:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.