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I am new to C++, here is my problem : I need this quantity :

h = pow(mesh.V()[i0],1.0/3);

but I get this error message whenever I compile the program :

    call of overloaded ‘pow(const double&, double)’ is ambiguous

And if I write

double V = mesh.V()[i0];
h = pow(V,1.0/3);

I get :

    call of overloaded ‘pow(double&, double)’ is ambiguous

Now I think I understand what const double& and double& refer to,but how can I convert the const double& to a double?

Thanks!

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5  
use std::pow() instead. also make sure you include <cmath> instead of math.h. –  Kyle Lutz Apr 11 '13 at 16:13
    
What are the candidate overloads the compiler shows with the ambiguity message? –  Nawaz Apr 11 '13 at 16:14
    
std::pow() worked like magic! thank you so much! –  FYas Apr 11 '13 at 16:17
    
what does it do exactly? –  FYas Apr 11 '13 at 16:17
    
@Farah.Yasmina: The qualification selects one of the overloads. I can imagine that you had something like using namespace std;, or you had another function called pow taking two doubles in your namespace.... or... that is why it is important to provide whole error messages. The compiler probably told you what overloads it was considering as ambiguous. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 11 '13 at 19:28

1 Answer 1

Now I think I understand what const double& and double& refer to,but how can I convert the const double& to a double?

Beware that some compilers use that syntax in error messages to represent something different than what it means in code. The error messages are telling you what the type used as the argument to the function is, rather than what the function takes.

If you want to get double in the error message you just need to call a function that returns by value a double, but that is not what you want.

What you need is to find out why the call is ambiguous. Is the compiler giving you later in the error message what function signatures are considered? It should, and reading the different overloads that it is considering will help in finding out why it is ambiguous in this context.

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