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What i'm doing is this:

UIViewController *rootController = [[[UIApplication sharedApplication] keyWindow] rootViewController];
AlarmRingViewController *alarmController = [[AlarmRingViewController alloc] init];
[rootController presentViewController:alarmController animated:YES];

What i want to achive with this, is to push my AlarmRingViewController on top of any other controller which is displaying at the moment and it works so far.

Now im wondering if this is good practice:

  • to instatiate a new viewController each time it should be presented
  • do so in a non UI related class? (in my case a scheduler for NSTimer)
  • from there push the newly created viewController with the rootViewController on top

Or does this violate the MVC pattern or Apples guidelines or anything. cheers

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Personally I think it's ugly code. It's hard to read and hard to debug. Split the code up a bit:

UIViewController *rootController = [[[UIApplication sharedApplication] keyWindow] rootViewController];
AlarmRingViewController *alarmController = [[AlarmRingViewController alloc] init];
[rootController presentViewController:alarmController animated:YES];

There is no benefit to typing so much into one line.

Update: Based on your updated question:

There is no problem instantiating a new view controller each time you need it. This is very common. It might be appropriate to create one and cache it. This is an optimization that could make sense if only one of the view controllers is every shown at any given time, the view controller is used very often, and it takes a lot of time to create.

View controllers are usually created and presented by other (view) controllers.

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Yes you are right, ugly code style, but i had other concerns. see updated question. (used your code now) –  Maximilian Körner Apr 11 '13 at 16:54
    
I updated my answer. –  rmaddy Apr 11 '13 at 16:59
    
To be clear, you see no problem in interfering with the UI flow like this from a controller class and pushing it ontop? –  Maximilian Körner Apr 11 '13 at 17:08
    
I can't speak to the "interfering" part because I don't know enough of what you are doing. But it's very standard that controller's push, pop, and present view controllers. In most cases it is other view controllers doing this but not always. –  rmaddy Apr 11 '13 at 17:12

Why don't you just use a UINavigationController as the root view controller. That way, you can just do this:

AlarmRingViewController *alarmController = [[AlarmRingViewController alloc] init];
[self.navigationController presentViewController:alarmController animated:YES completion:nil];
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