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I have a model that has an attribute with spaces. This seems to be ok. However, I'm having trouble passing it to an underscore template.

See this fiddle for my exact problem.

var Person = Backbone.Model.extend({
    defaults: {
    'first name' : 'Mendel'
}
});
var person = new Person();
var template = _.template("Hello <%= 'first name' %>!");
console.log(person.get('first name'));
// Possible ??
console.log(template(person.attributes));

Tried searching for a solution, but no luck so far.

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The underlying problem is that _.template:

By default, template places the values from your data in the local scope via the with statement.

so everything that you use inside <%= ... %> is assumed to be a valid JavaScript variable name. Your first name is not a valid JavaScript variable name so everything falls apart.

A quick solution would be to namespace everything by hand so that you can use [] to get at your property and thus avoid the "JavaScript variable names cannot contain spaces" problem:

var template = _.template("Hello <%= person['first name'] %>!");
console.log(template({ person: person.attributes}));

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/ambiguous/5v7XQ/

If you don't mind upgrading your Underscore (a good idea) then you can use the data option:

However, you can specify a single variable name with the variable setting. This can significantly improve the speed at which a template is able to render.

_.template("Using 'with': <%= data.answer %>", {answer: 'no'}, {variable: 'data'});
=> "Using 'with': no"

Then you could do this:

var template = _.template("Hello <%= person['first name'] %>!", null, { variable: 'person' });
console.log(template(person.attributes));

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/ambiguous/NXhSN/

Another option is to stop using attributes that have spaces in their names. If all your model attribute names are also valid JavaScript variable names then the problem goes away.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @mu. It makes things simpler if my attribute names follow the css attributes they model (which include dashes). So now I just have to decide which is the lesser pain: replace underscore char with dash when needed, or rewrite templates with namespaced var. Hmmm. Thank you so much for your input! –  Mendel Apr 11 '13 at 19:13

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