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I'm creating a macro for Trac, and one of the things it does is to render a bit of wiki text, that can in turn use the same macro.

This can give rise to an infinite recursion if the inner macro is invoked with the same arguments (i.e., renders the same bit of wiki text). I thought of trying to stop the user from shooting his own foot like this by inspecting the call stack and breaking the recursion if the function that expands the macro was already invoked with exactly the same set of arguments.

I've been looking at the inspect module, which definitely seems like the way to go, but still couldn't figure out how to discover the argument values of the previous function on the stack. How can I do this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Catching the recursion exception is the better approach, but you could also add a decorator on the functions you wanted to 'protect':

from functools import wraps
from threading import local

def recursion_detector(func):
    func._thread_locals = local()

    @wraps(func)
    def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        params = tuple(args) + tuple(kwargs.items())

        if not hasattr(func._thread_locals, 'seen'):
            func._thread_locals.seen = set()
        if params in func._thread_locals.seen:
            raise RuntimeError('Already called this function with the same arguments')

        func._thread_locals.seen.add(params)
        try:
            res = func(*args, **kwargs)
        finally:
            func._thread_locals.seen.remove(params)

        return res

    return wrapper

then apply that decorator to the macro render function.

A simple demo:

>>> @recursion_detector
... def foo(bar):
...     return foo(not bar)
... 
>>> foo(True)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 10, in wrapper
  File "<stdin>", line 3, in foo
  File "<stdin>", line 10, in wrapper
  File "<stdin>", line 3, in foo
  File "<stdin>", line 7, in wrapper
RuntimeError: Already called this function with the same arguments
>>> foo(False)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 10, in wrapper
  File "<stdin>", line 3, in foo
  File "<stdin>", line 10, in wrapper
  File "<stdin>", line 3, in foo
  File "<stdin>", line 7, in wrapper
RuntimeError: Already called this function with the same arguments
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Interesting! Would you say this is thread-safe? (it will take some time for me to really get how it works, because I haven't played much with decorators yet) –  Filipe Correia Apr 11 '13 at 18:11
    
I.e., if there are several calls in the same process, won't it use the func.seen set to store all the calls, rather that only the calls of a particular call stack? –  Filipe Correia Apr 11 '13 at 18:14
    
@FilipeCorreia: yes, this is not yet thread-safe, but that's not hard to achieve; will update later on to fix that. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 11 '13 at 18:39
1  
@FilipeCorreia: New and improved version, now thread-safe! :-) –  Martijn Pieters Apr 11 '13 at 19:42
    
Great, thanks! For future readers, this post provides a nice explanation and example of how threading.local works. –  Filipe Correia Apr 12 '13 at 10:13

It's easier to just catch the recursion error when it happens, than trying to catch it before it happens, in runtime.

If that's not an option, analyzing the template before rendering could be a way forward as well.

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2  
Provided the code doesn't take too long to get a stack overflow. If it does, this may be impractical. (+1) –  NPE Apr 11 '13 at 17:58
    
@NPE: Sure, if it is a very slow process. But rendering a template shouldn't be. –  Lennart Regebro Apr 11 '13 at 17:58
    
That was my first try, but for some reason that I still can't understand, no exception is being raised when this happens. When I provoke this when running trac through {{tracd}}, the process just... stops. No debug message. No exception. Nothing. –  Filipe Correia Apr 11 '13 at 18:00
    
I guess it's being caught by trac somewhere... –  Lennart Regebro Apr 11 '13 at 18:01
    
@LennartRegebro surely... although I was able to determine it was failing on the 97th iteration, and used a debugger to step through the code to see where it was failing. Strangely, this is when a function returns (I was expecting it was on a call), and it doesn't stop in a breakpoint I have in the closest try .. except block. –  Filipe Correia Apr 11 '13 at 18:08

Equally simple would be to pass dictionary to keep track of used arguments and at the beginning check if argument has already been tried.

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It's not that simple, because I'm using trac's API. To add the macro, I need to override the method expand_macro(self, formatter, name, content), that is provided by IWikiMacroProvider. It's not this method that calls itself directly, but somewhere inside a call I do to Chrome(self.env).render_template(...). –  Filipe Correia Apr 11 '13 at 18:04
    
I guess @MartijnPieters's answers is close to what you were suggesting. –  Filipe Correia Apr 11 '13 at 18:18

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