Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm still trying to understand JavaScript, and I wonder about what the best way is to create an object that has properties and methods.

I have seen examples where the person used "var self = this" and then uses "self." in all functions to make sure the scope is always correct.

Then I have seen examples of using .prototype to add properties, while others do it inline.

Can someone give me a proper example of a JavaScript object with some Properties and Methods?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
3  
There is no "best" way. –  Triptych Oct 20 '09 at 16:35
    
Isn't self a reserved word? If not, it should be; since self is a pre-defined variable referring to the current window. self === window –  Shaz Apr 13 '11 at 12:09
1  
@Shaz: it's not a reserved word any more than other properties of window in the Browser Object Model like document or frames; you can certainly re-use the identifier as a variable name. Although, yeah, stylistically I prefer var that= this to avoid any possible confusion. Even though window.self is ultimately pointless so there's rarely any reason to touch it. –  bobince Oct 24 '11 at 19:17
3  
When JS is minified, assigning this to a local variable (e.g. self) reduces file sizes. –  Patrick Fisher Mar 17 '13 at 9:11
    
use this library: classjs.weew.ch it couldn't be easier –  M K Aug 10 '13 at 7:03

9 Answers 9

up vote 614 down vote accepted

There are two models for implementing classes and instances in JavaScript: the prototyping way, and the closure way. Both have advantages and drawbacks, and there are plenty of extended variations. Many programmers and libraries have different approaches and class-handling utility functions to paper over some of the uglier parts of the language.

The result is that in mixed company you will have a mishmash of metaclasses, all behaving slightly differently. What's worse, most JavaScript tutorial material is terrible and serves up some kind of in-between compromise to cover all bases, leaving you very confused. (Probably the author is also confused. JavaScript's object model is very different to most programming languages, and in many places straight-up badly designed.)

Let's start with the prototype way. This is the most JavaScript-native you can get: there is a minimum of overhead code and instanceof will work with instances of this kind of object.

function Shape(x, y) {
    this.x= x;
    this.y= y;
}

We can add methods to the instance created by new Shape by writing them to the prototype lookup of this constructor function:

Shape.prototype.toString= function() {
    return 'Shape at '+this.x+', '+this.y;
};

Now to subclass it, in as much as you can call what JavaScript does subclassing. We do that by completely replacing that weird magic prototype property:

function Circle(x, y, r) {
    Shape.call(this, x, y); // invoke the base class's constructor function to take co-ords
    this.r= r;
}
Circle.prototype= new Shape();

before adding methods to it:

Circle.prototype.toString= function() {
    return 'Circular '+Shape.prototype.toString.call(this)+' with radius '+this.r;
}

This example will work and you will see code like it in many tutorials. But man, that new Shape() is ugly: we're instantiating the base class even though no actual Shape is to be created. It happens to work in this simple case because JavaScript is so sloppy: it allows zero arguments to be passed in, in which case x and y become undefined and are assigned to the prototype's this.x and this.y. If the constructor function were doing anything more complicated, it would fall flat on its face.

So what we need to do is find a way to create a prototype object which contains the methods and other members we want at a class level, without calling the base class's constructor function. To do this we are going to have to start writing helper code. This is the simplest approach I know of:

function subclassOf(base) {
    _subclassOf.prototype= base.prototype;
    return new _subclassOf();
}
function _subclassOf() {};

This transfers the base class's members in its prototype to a new constructor function which does nothing, then uses that constructor. Now we can write simply:

function Circle(x, y, r) {
    Shape.call(this, x, y);
    this.r= r;
}
Circle.prototype= subclassOf(Shape);

instead of the new Shape() wrongness. We now have an acceptable set of primitives to built classes.

There are a few refinements and extensions we can consider under this model. For example here is a syntactical-sugar version:

Function.prototype.subclass= function(base) {
    var c= Function.prototype.subclass.nonconstructor;
    c.prototype= base.prototype;
    this.prototype= new c();
};
Function.prototype.subclass.nonconstructor= function() {};

...

function Circle(x, y, r) {
    Shape.call(this, x, y);
    this.r= r;
}
Circle.subclass(Shape);

Either version has the drawback that the constructor function cannot be inherited, as it is in many languages. So even if your subclass adds nothing to the construction process, it must remember to call the base constructor with whatever arguments the base wanted. This can be slightly automated using apply, but still you have to write out:

function Point() {
    Shape.apply(this, arguments);
}
Point.subclass(Shape);

So a common extension is to break out the initialisation stuff into its own function rather than the constructor itself. This function can then inherit from the base just fine:

function Shape() { this._init.apply(this, arguments); }
Shape.prototype._init= function(x, y) {
    this.x= x;
    this.y= y;
};

function Point() { this._init.apply(this, arguments); }
Point.subclass(Shape);
// no need to write new initialiser for Point!

Now we've just got the same constructor function boilerplate for each class. Maybe we can move that out into its own helper function so we don't have to keep typing it, for example instead of Function.prototype.subclass, turning it round and letting the base class's Function spit out subclasses:

Function.prototype.makeSubclass= function() {
    function Class() {
        if ('_init' in this)
            this._init.apply(this, arguments);
    }
    Function.prototype.makeSubclass.nonconstructor.prototype= this.prototype;
    Class.prototype= new Function.prototype.makeSubclass.nonconstructor();
    return Class;
};
Function.prototype.makeSubclass.nonconstructor= function() {};

...

Shape= Object.makeSubclass();
Shape.prototype._init= function(x, y) {
    this.x= x;
    this.y= y;
};

Point= Shape.makeSubclass();

Circle= Shape.makeSubclass();
Circle.prototype._init= function(x, y, r) {
    Shape.prototype._init.call(this, x, y);
    this.r= r;
};

...which is starting to look a bit more like other languages, albeit with slightly clumsier syntax. You can sprinkle in a few extra features if you like. Maybe you want makeSubclass to take and remember a class name and provide a default toString using it. Maybe you want to make the constructor detect when it has accidentally been called without the new operator (which would otherwise often result in very annoying debugging):

Function.prototype.makeSubclass= function() {
    function Class() {
        if (!(this instanceof Class))
            throw('Constructor called without "new"');
        ...

Maybe you want to pass in all the new members and have makeSubclass add them to the prototype, to save you having to write Class.prototype... quite so much. A lot of class systems do that, eg:

Circle= Shape.makeSubclass({
    _init: function(x, y, z) {
        Shape.prototype._init.call(this, x, y);
        this.r= r;
    },
    ...
});

There are a lot of potential features you might consider desirable in an object system and no-one really agrees on one particular formula.


The closure way, then. This avoids the problems of JavaScript's prototype-based inheritance, by not using inheritance at all. Instead:

function Shape(x, y) {
    var that= this;

    this.x= x;
    this.y= y;

    this.toString= function() {
        return 'Shape at '+that.x+', '+that.y;
    };
}

function Circle(x, y, r) {
    var that= this;

    Shape.call(this, x, y);
    this.r= r;

    var _baseToString= this.toString;
    this.toString= function() {
        return 'Circular '+_baseToString(that)+' with radius '+that.r;
    };
};

var mycircle= new Circle();

Now every single instance of Shape will have its own copy of the toString method (and any other methods or other class members we add).

The bad thing about every instance having its own copy of each class member is that it's less efficient. If you are dealing with large numbers of subclassed instances, prototypical inheritance may serve you better. Also calling a method of the base class is slightly annoying as you can see: we have to remember what the method was before the subclass constructor overwrote it, or it gets lost.

[Also because there is no inheritance here, the instanceof operator won't work; you would have to provide your own mechanism for class-sniffing if you need it. Whilst you could fiddle the prototype objects in a similar way as with prototype inheritance, it's a bit tricky and not really worth it just to get instanceof working.]

The good thing about every instance having its own method is that the method may then be bound to the specific instance that owns it. This is useful because of JavaScript's weird way of binding this in method calls, which has the upshot that if you detach a method from its owner:

var ts= mycircle.toString;
alert(ts());

then this inside the method won't be the Circle instance as expected (it'll actually be the global window object, causing widespread debugging woe). In reality this typically happens when a method is taken and assigned to a setTimeout, onclick or EventListener in general.

With the prototype way, you have to include a closure for every such assignment:

setTimeout(function() {
    mycircle.move(1, 1);
}, 1000);

or, in the future (or now if you hack Function.prototype) you can also do it with function.bind():

setTimeout(mycircle.move.bind(mycircle, 1, 1), 1000);

if your instances are done the closure way, the binding is done for free by the closure over the instance variable (usually called that or self, though personally I would advise against the latter as self already has another, different meaning in JavaScript). You don't get the arguments 1, 1 in the above snippet for free though, so you would still need another closure or a bind() if you need to do that.

There are lots of variants on the closure method too. You may prefer to omit this completely, creating a new that and returning it instead of using the new operator:

function Shape(x, y) {
    var that= {};

    that.x= x;
    that.y= y;

    that.toString= function() {
        return 'Shape at '+that.x+', '+that.y;
    };

    return that;
}

function Circle(x, y, r) {
    var that= Shape(x, y);

    that.r= r;

    var _baseToString= that.toString;
    that.toString= function() {
        return 'Circular '+_baseToString(that)+' with radius '+r;
    };

    return that;
};

var mycircle= Circle(); // you can include `new` if you want but it won't do anything

Which way is “proper”? Both. Which is “best”? That depends on your situation. FWIW I tend towards prototyping for real JavaScript inheritance when I'm doing strongly OO stuff, and closures for simple throwaway page effects.

But both ways are quite counter-intuitive to most programmers. Both have many potential messy variations. You will meet both (as well as many in-between and generally broken schemes) if you use other people's code/libraries. There is no one generally-accepted answer. Welcome to the wonderful world of JavaScript objects.

[This has been part 94 of Why JavaScript Is Not My Favourite Programming Language.]

share|improve this answer
9  
Very nice gradual step-through from "class" def to object instantiation. And nice touch on bypassing new. –  Crescent Fresh Oct 21 '09 at 1:02
105  
Wow - that's a loooooooooong answer.. +1 –  meder Oct 21 '09 at 1:22
33  
Of course I do, so does everyone: the class-and-instance model is the more natural one for a majority of the common problems programmers face today. I do agree that, on a theory basis, prototype-based inheritance can potentially offer a more flexible way of working, but JavaScript totally does not deliver on that promise. Its clunky constructor function system gives us the worst of both worlds, making class-like inheritance hard whilst providing none of the flexibility or simplicity prototypes could offer. In short, it's poo. –  bobince Oct 21 '09 at 2:05
11  
Sometimes I wish I could upvote more than once. +1 (only). –  Grundlefleck Nov 10 '09 at 21:54
22  
Bobince... have you considered writing a book on web dev? I'd love to read it! –  alex Feb 12 '10 at 3:32

I use this pattern fairly frequently - I've found that it gives me a pretty huge amount of flexibility when I need it. In use it's rather similar to Java-style classes.

var Foo = function()
{

    var privateStaticMethod = function() {};
    var privateStaticVariable = "foo";

    var constructor = function Foo(foo, bar)
    {
        var privateMethod = function() {};
        this.publicMethod = function() {};
    };

    constructor.publicStaticMethod = function() {};

    return constructor;
}();

This uses an anonymous function that is called upon creation, returning a new constructor function. Because the anonymous function is called only once, you can create private static variables in it (they're inside the closure, visible to the other members of the class). The constructor function is basically a standard Javascript object - you define private attributes inside of it, and public attributes are attached to the this variable.

Basically, this approach combines the Crockfordian approach with standard Javascript objects to create a more powerful class.

You can use it just like you would any other Javascript object:

Foo.publicStaticMethod(); //calling a static method
var test = new Foo();     //instantiation
test.publicMethod();      //calling a method
share|improve this answer
3  
That looks interesting, because it's rather close to my "home-turf" which is C#. I also think I start to understand why privateStaticVariable is really private (as it's defined within the scope of a function and kept alive as long as there are references to it?) –  Michael Stum Oct 20 '09 at 22:05
    
Yep, that's it exactly. –  ShZ Oct 20 '09 at 22:23
    
Since it isn't using this does it still need to be instantiated with new? –  Jordan Parmer Dec 17 '12 at 20:42
    
Actually, this does get used in the constructor function, which becomes Foo in the example. –  ShZ Jan 4 '13 at 5:45
1  
@virtualnobi: This pattern doesn't prevent you from writing protytpe methods: constructor.prototype.myMethod = function () { ... }. –  Glauber Rocha Feb 17 at 9:42

Douglas Crockford discusses that topic extensively in The Good Parts. He recommends to avoid the new operator to create new objects. Instead he proposes to create customized constructors. For instance:

var mammal = function (spec) {     
   var that = {}; 
   that.get_name = function (  ) { 
      return spec.name; 
   }; 
   that.says = function (  ) { 
      return spec.saying || ''; 
   }; 
   return that; 
}; 

var myMammal = mammal({name: 'Herb'});

In Javascript a function is an object, and can be used to construct objects out of together with the new operator. By convention, functions intended to be used as constructors start with a capital letter. You often see things like:

function Person() {
   this.name = "John";
   return this;
}

var person = new Person();
alert("name: " + person.name);**

In case you forget to use the new operator while instantiating a new object, what you get is an ordinary function call, and this is bound to the global object instead to the new object.

share|improve this answer
3  
Is it me or do I think Crockford makes absolutely no sense with his bashing of the new operator? –  meder Oct 20 '09 at 16:41
1  
@meder: Not just you. At least, I think there's nothing wrong with the new operator. And there's an implicit new in var that = {}; anyway. –  Tim Down Oct 20 '09 at 23:04
12  
Crockford is a cranky old man and I disagree with him on a lot, but he is at least promoting taking a critical look at JavaScript and it's worth listening to what he has to say. –  bobince Oct 21 '09 at 0:24
1  
@bobince: Agreed. His writing on closures opened my eyes to a lot of stuff about 5 years ago, and he encourages a thoughtful approach. –  Tim Down Oct 21 '09 at 8:35
9  
I agree with Crockford. The issue with the new operator is that JavaScript will make the context of "this" very different than when otherwise calling a function. Despite the proper case convention, there are issues that arise on larger code bases as developers forget to use new, forget to capitalize, etc. To be pragmatic, you can do everything you need to do without the new keyword - so why use it and introduce more points of failure in the code? JS is a prototypal, not class based, language. So why do we want it to act like a staticly typed language? I certainly don't. –  Joshua Ramirez Jun 30 '12 at 22:38

You can also do it this way, using structures :

function createCounter () {
    var count = 0;

    return {
        increaseBy: function(nb) {
            count += nb;
        },
        reset: function {
            count = 0;
        }
    }
}

Then :

var counter1 = createCounter();
counter1.increaseBy(4);
share|improve this answer
5  
I don't like that way because whitespace is important. The curly after the return must be on the same line for cross-browser compatibility. –  geowa4 Oct 20 '09 at 19:14

When one uses the trick of closing on "this" during a constructor invocation, it's in order to write a function that can be used as a callback by some other object that doesn't want to invoke a method on an object. It's not related to "making the scope correct".

Here's a vanilla JavaScript object:

function MyThing(aParam) {
    var myPrivateVariable = "squizzitch";

    this.someProperty = aParam;
    this.useMeAsACallback = function() {
        console.log("Look, I have access to " + myPrivateVariable + "!");
    }
}

// Every MyThing will get this method for free:
MyThing.prototype.someMethod = function() {
    console.log(this.someProperty);
};

You might get a lot out of reading what Douglas Crockford has to say about JavaScript. John Resig is also brilliant. Good luck!

share|improve this answer
1  
Uh, closing around this has everything to do with "making the scope correct". –  Roatin Marth Oct 20 '09 at 15:59
    
No, it doesn't "correct" anything. –  Jonathan Feinberg Oct 20 '09 at 16:27
3  
Jonathan is right. The scope of a js function is whatever you design it to be. The self=this trick is one way to tie it to particular instance so it doesn't change when called in another context. But sometimes that's what you actually want. Depends on context. –  Marco Oct 20 '09 at 17:55
    
I think you're all saying the same thing actually. self=this although doesn't force this to persist, easily allows "correct" scoping via a closure. –  Crescent Fresh Oct 21 '09 at 1:05
1  
The reason you do that=this is to give nested functions access to the scope of this as it exists in the constructor function. When nested functions are inside constructor functions, their "this" scope reverts to the global scope. –  Joshua Ramirez Jun 30 '12 at 22:41

Another way would be http://jsfiddle.net/nnUY4/ (i dont know if this kind of handling object creation and revealing functions follow any specific pattern)

// Build-Reveal

var person={
create:function(_name){ // 'constructor'
                        //  prevents direct instantiation 
                        //  but no inheritance
    return (function() {

        var name=_name||"defaultname";  // private variable

        // [some private functions]

        function getName(){
            return name;
        }

        function setName(_name){
            name=_name;
        }

        return {    // revealed functions
            getName:getName,    
            setName:setName
        }
    })();
   }
  }

  // … no (instantiated) person so far …

  var p=person.create(); // name will be set to 'defaultname'
  p.setName("adam");        // and overwritten
  var p2=person.create("eva"); // or provide 'constructor parameters'
  alert(p.getName()+":"+p2.getName()); // alerts "adam:eva"
share|improve this answer

Closure is versatile. bobince has well summarized the prototype vs. closure approaches when creating objects. However you can mimic some aspects of OOP using closure in a functional programming way. Remember functions are objects in JavaScript; so use function as object in a different way.

Here is an example of closure:

function outer(outerArg) {
    return inner(innerArg) {
        return innerArg + outerArg; //the scope chain is composed of innerArg and outerArg from the outer context 
    }
}

A while ago I came across the Mozilla's article on Closure. Here is what jump at my eyes: "A closure lets you associate some data (the environment) with a function that operates on that data. This has obvious parallels to object oriented programming, where objects allow us to associate some data (the object's properties) with one or more methods". It was the very first time I read a parallelism between closure and classic OOP with no reference to prototype.

How?

Suppose you want to calculate the VAT of some items. The VAT is likely to stay stable during the lifetime of an application. One way to do it in OOP (pseudo code):

public class Calculator {
    public property VAT { get; private set; }
    public Calculator(int vat) {
        this.VAT = vat;
    }
    public int Calculate(int price) {
        return price * this.VAT;
    }
}

Basically you pass a VAT value into your constructor and your calculate method can operate upon it via closure. Now instead of using a class/constructor, pass your VAT as an argument into a function. Because the only stuff you are interested in is the calculation itself, returns a new function, which is the calculate method:

function calculator(vat) {
    return function(item) {
        return item * vat;
    }
}
var calculate = calculator(1.10);
var jsBook = 100; //100$
calculate(jsBook); //110

In your project identify top-level values that are good candidate of what VAT is for calculation. As a rule of thumb whenever you pass the same arguments on and on, there is a way to improve it using closure. No need to create traditional objects.

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Guide/Closures

share|improve this answer

Instead of using a pattern, why not use a library?

share|improve this answer

I came across this small tutorial on creating classes in javascript: http://www.mimasoftware.com/2014/03/how-to-create-classes-in-javascript.html It's helped me get a better handle on creating custom objects in javascript.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.