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I have the following method that makes a deep copy of a dictionary:

public static Dictionary<string, MyClass> deepCopyDic(Dictionary<string, MyClass> src)
{
    //Copies a dictionary with all of its elements
    //RETURN:
    //      = Dictionary copy
    Dictionary<string, MyClass> dic = new Dictionary<string, MyClass>();
    for (int i = 0; i < src.Count; i++)
    {
        dic.Add(src.ElementAt(i).Key, new MyClass(src.ElementAt(i).Value));
    }

    return dic;
}

I was wondering, can I somehow make it into a template? I need MyClass to be a template.

share|improve this question
    
... a template for what? –  Jeremy Holovacs Apr 11 '13 at 18:41
    
@JeremyHolovacs: For MyClass to be MyOtherClass or MyAnotherClass, etc. –  ahmd0 Apr 11 '13 at 18:42
    
you mean an abstract class? An interface? –  Jeremy Holovacs Apr 11 '13 at 18:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use Generics with where TValue : ICloneable constraint:

public static Dictionary<TKey, TValue> deepCopyDic<TKey, TValue>(Dictionary<TKey, TValue> src)
    where TValue : ICloneable
{
    //Copies a dictionary with all of its elements
    //RETURN:
    //      = Dictionary copy
    Dictionary<TKey, TValue> dic = new Dictionary<TKey, TValue>();
    foreach (var item in src)
    {
        dic.Add(item.Key, (TValue)item.Value.Clone());
    }

    return dic;
}

You'll have to implement ICloneable interface in every class you'd like to pass into that method.

Or a bit improved version, with Key cloned as well:

public static Dictionary<TKey, TValue> deepCopyDic<TKey, TValue>(Dictionary<TKey, TValue> src)
    where TValue : ICloneable
    where TKey : ICloneable
{
    return src.ToDictionary(i => (TKey)i.Key.Clone(), i => (TValue)i.Value.Clone());
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That's what I was missing :) –  ahmd0 Apr 11 '13 at 18:45
    
So instead of ICloneable can I just copy it with the new and the constructor? –  ahmd0 Apr 11 '13 at 18:47
1  
@ahmd0 And I'm telling you that your code to iterate the dictionary is very broken, even before you do anything with it. Next, a copy isn't just deep or shallow, it's more complex than that. It's a sliding scale. You could copy a reference to the dictionary. You could create a new dictionary but just copy the references to items in it. You could create a new dictionary and new items, but copy references of items inside those items, etc. A "deep copy" implies going all the way to the lowest level, not stopping at some earlier point. –  Servy Apr 11 '13 at 20:52
1  
@ahmd0 only to leave me hanging? After so many answers/comments i still don't know what you are really want to do. Don't you think I may be a problem with you. Or what do you understand from copying a dictionary?. –  I4V Apr 11 '13 at 22:04
1  
@ahmd0 If only there was some place where you could go to get information about virtually anything, let's call this made up place "Google". Going to such a place might allow you to enter a word, say "serialization", perhaps with some additional context, say "serialization C#" and instantly get millions of references to detailed and reputable sources describing what the concept was, and how you could go about using it. Wouldn't the mythical world containing such a marvelous tool be wonderful. –  Servy Apr 11 '13 at 22:19

The Serialized approach is the only way as noted above. ICloneable does not guarantee that all properties in the object being clone is not assigning references unless you have full control over the object which is never a good assumption, especially in a large team.

The only cavet of the Serialized approach is that all objects being passed in the dictionary are serializable. Also, serializing is not always very efficient because of the over use of Reflection that occurs, which shouldn't be used in high preformance areas of code.

I solved this problem using an approach known as fast serialization but it requires that all objects that you plan to clone support a specific interface. It's always speed vs. complexity.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, I forgot to mention. Dictionaries are not Serializable. So, if you plan to use the Serializable technique, you would need to iterate all your objects in the Dictionary. –  code5 Apr 11 '13 at 21:17

You can use this

public static Dictionary<string, T> deepCopyDic<T>(Dictionary<string, T> src) 
        {
            Dictionary<string, T> dic = new Dictionary<string, T>();

            for (int i = 0; i < src.Count; i++)
            {
                dic.Add(src.ElementAt(i).Key, (T)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T), new object[] { src.ElementAt(i).Value })); //new T((src.ElementAt(i)));
            }

            return dic;
        }

Here is Class A which i used for Test

public class A
        {
            public A()
            {
            }
            public A(string str)
            {
            }
            public A(A str)
            {
            }
        }

Here is the Test code

  Dictionary<string, A> dct1 = new Dictionary<string, A>();
            dct1.Add("1", new A("test"));

            Dictionary<string, A> dest = deepCopyDic(dct1);
share|improve this answer
    
1) See my earlier comment, use a foreach to iterate a dictionary. 2) This assumes that the object has a copy constructor as it's means of cloning itself. It may not (and there is no compile time error if it doesn't, either). –  Servy Apr 11 '13 at 20:49

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