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I got it into my head fairly recently that I would attempt to create a tree of 'lists'. That is, a tree where each level is a list, so it's not a binary tree. Furthermore, I wanted to try to make each level of the tree a different type, specifically four different types - one for each level. Lastly, I intended to see if I could, at compile-time, fix the height of the tree by employing three different templates.

tree_middle, for the the intermediate levels of the tree,

template<typename a, typename b, typename c>
struct tree_middle
{
    tree_middle *m_prev;
    tree_middle *m_next;

    a *m_upper;

    b *m_node;

    c *m_lower;
};

tree_bottom, for the bottom of the tree,

template<typename a, typename b>
struct tree_bottom
{
    tree_bottom *m_prev;
    tree_bottom *m_next;

    a *m_upper;

    b *m_node;
};

and tree_top for the top of the tree.

template<typename a, typename b>
struct tree_top
{
    tree_top *m_prev;
    tree_top *m_next;

    a *m_node;

    b *m_lower;
};

After toying around with different implementations, I basically resorted to some workarounds wherein I had a type that denoted the penultimate tree level:

template<typename a, typename b, typename c>
struct tree_prebottom
{
    tree_prebottom *m_prev;
    tree_prebottom *m_next;

    a *m_upper;

    b *m_node;

    tree_bottom<tree_prebottom, c> *m_lower;
};

By defining yet another template, I could create a tree that was fixed at three levels with three different types. Notice that three_tree functions as tree_top in this template. This is close to what I wanted.

template<typename a, typename b, typename c>
struct three_tree
{
    three_tree *m_prev;
    three_tree *m_next;

    a *m_node;

    tree_prebottom<three_tree, b, c> *m_lower;
};

Taking that one step further, I ended up with a template that could generate the type that I was looking for, the four_tree. But notice this ludicrous display going on here? I am writing 'generic' code in a rather loose sense here, agreed? The only thing generic about it at are the consumed types, really. Note: This part was edited when I noticed that the four_tree had no proper link back to the top level.)

template<typename a, typename b, typename c, typename d>
struct tree_threebottom
{
    tree_threebottom *m_prev;
    tree_threebottom *m_next;

    a *m_upper;

    b *m_node;

    tree_prebottom<tree_threebottom, c, d> *m_lower;
};

template<typename a, typename b, typename c, typename d>
struct four_tree
{
    four_tree *m_prev;
    four_tree *m_next;

    a *m_node;

    tree_threebottom<four_tree, b, c, d> *m_lower;
};

The question is, is there a better and more elegant way to do this? The roadblock I ran into when trying to do the original implementation was that when you're specifying type inputs for a template, you can't pass the type you're 'in' at the moment as a parameter. Thus, my approach suffered from never being able to create a complete type due to a sort of cyclic dependency. Even the two level tree suffers from this if you just limit yourself to tree_top and tree_bottom:

template<typename a, typename b>
struct tree_bottom
{
    tree_bottom *m_prev;
    tree_bottom *m_next;

    a *m_upper;

    b *m_node;
};

template<typename a, typename b>
struct tree_top
{
    tree_top *m_prev;
    tree_top *m_next;

    a *m_node;

    b *m_lower;
};

The templates are fine on their own, until you try to define an actual type with them. For example

typedef tree_top< int, tree_bottom<tree_top<int, tree_bottom< /*see the problem?*/, short> > int_short_tree;

Note that the tree implementation is pretty simplistic, but I was looking to emulate a tree template I found here: http://archive.gamedev.net/archive/reference/programming/features/coretree2/index.html I have also seen similar implementations elsewhere, but they all assume a tree composed of a single type. The natural response to this might be, "Well why not use polymorphism?". I have seen that technique in action as well, such as in the LLVM project, and while I don't have any problem with it, I was curious to know if I could statically (at compile time) construct a type that subverts the need for polymorphism, since in my particular case I knew all of the types involved, and I knew that the tree had a fixed height (four).

I also contemplated using inheritance combined with templates to achieve a more robust solution, but the solution has eluded me, if it exists. It seems to me that I could manually create types of this sort, including trees with 5 levels or more. Am I hitting a limitation of the template system here, or just not being clever enough?

share|improve this question
    
This might be better in codereview.stackexchange.com –  Peter Wood Apr 11 '13 at 19:45
    
stlplus can be useful. –  lsalamon Apr 11 '13 at 19:58
    
I think what you're trying to create is something like a doubly-linked type list, and AFAIK, that's impossible. You can create a singly-linked type list, where each type points to the next type. In your tree, that would be each level/node knows the type of its child node/type but NOT the type of its parent. But of course, you can create doubly-linked lists at run-time, so you had to use type of m_upper a pointer to a type X that does not include its own base classes as template arguments. From this type X, derive the actual node type and use polymorphism. –  dyp Apr 11 '13 at 20:51
    
@PeterWood I've no problem with that if that's the appropriate location for this sort of question. –  mathonnapkins Apr 12 '13 at 13:52
    
@DyP Yes, creating trees in this way when you only need one direction of linking is substantially easier, but navigating a tree in only one direction kind of defeats the point a bit. If only there were a way to partially construct a type and then finish it in a later step... Also what you say isn't entirely true. I can achieve what I want by using the tree_middle template listed above, but using void to endcap the four level tree. Example : typedef tree_middle<void, char, tree_middle<char, short, tree_middle<short, int, tree_middle<int, long, void> > > > char_short_int_long_tree; –  mathonnapkins Apr 12 '13 at 13:59
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think I have an idea of what you want and how you could achieve it. It doesn't fit well the SO format, though, I think.

First, the syntax to create & use the tree:

int main()
{
    // We want a tree with 4 levels.
    // The node type of the 0th level should be `int`,
    // of the 1st level `double` and so on.
    // (0th level = tree root)
    // And we initialize the root node with the `int` 42.
    auto my_tree = make_tree_root < int, double, char, float, int > (42);

    // add children and navigate through the tree
    my_tree.add_child(1.23);
    my_tree.add_child(4.56);
    my_tree.get_child(1).add_child('x');
    my_tree.get_child(1).get_child(0).add_child(1.2f);

    my_tree.print();
}

And now the mess in the background. Note that it is rather a proof-of-concept, it has so many flaws that having no comments may be a bless. Especially the multiple inheritance used to reduce code copying creates more problems than it solves.

#include <cstddef>
#include <iostream>    
#include <vector>

template < typename... TP >
struct type_vector
{
private:
    template < std::size_t t_count, typename TT, typename... TTP >
    struct access_elem { using value = typename access_elem < t_count-1, TTP... > :: value; }; 
        template < typename TT, typename... TTP >
        struct access_elem < 0, TT, TTP... > { using value = TT; };

public:
    template < std::size_t t_id >
    using elem = typename access_elem < t_id, TP... > :: value;
};


template < typename, std::size_t, std::size_t >
struct tree_node;

template < typename T_type_vector, std::size_t t_level, std::size_t t_maxLevel >
struct tree_all_base
{
    using node = typename T_type_vector::template elem < t_level >;

protected:
    node m_node;

public:
    explicit tree_all_base(node p) : m_node(p) {}

    void change_node(node);
    node get_node() const { return m_node; }

    void print() const
    {
        std::cout << "node: " << m_node << std::endl;
    }
};

template < typename T_type_vector, std::size_t t_level, std::size_t t_maxLevel >
struct tree_down_base
{
    using child = tree_node < T_type_vector, t_level+1, t_maxLevel >;

private:
    std::vector<child> m_children;

public:
    void add_child(typename child::node p)
    {
        using derived_type = tree_node < T_type_vector, t_level, t_maxLevel >;
        m_children.push_back( child{p, static_cast<derived_type*>(this)} );
    } 
    child const& get_child(std::size_t id) const { return m_children.at(id); }
    child& get_child(std::size_t id) { return m_children.at(id); }
    // further methods like `remove_child` etc

protected:
    void print() const
    {
        std::cout << "children: ";
        for(child const& c : m_children)
        {
            std::cout << c.get_node() << ", ";
        }
        std::cout << std::endl;
        for(child const& c : m_children)
        {
            c.print();
        }
        std::cout << std::endl;
    }
};

template < typename T_type_vector, std::size_t t_level, std::size_t t_maxLevel >
struct tree_up_base
    : public tree_all_base < T_type_vector, t_level, t_maxLevel >
{
    using tree_all_base_ = tree_all_base<T_type_vector,t_level,t_maxLevel>;
    using parent = tree_node < T_type_vector, t_level-1, t_maxLevel >;
    using node = typename tree_all_base_::node;

protected:
    parent* m_parent;

    tree_up_base(node p_node, parent* p)
        : tree_all_base_(p_node), m_parent(p)
    {}
};


template < typename T_type_vector, std::size_t t_level, std::size_t t_maxLevel >
struct tree_node
    : public tree_up_base  <T_type_vector, t_level, t_maxLevel>
    , public tree_down_base<T_type_vector, t_level, t_maxLevel>
{
    using node = typename tree_all_base<T_type_vector,t_level,t_maxLevel>::node;
private:
    /* inherit ctor....*/
    using tree_up_base_ = tree_up_base<T_type_vector,t_level,t_maxLevel>;
    using tree_down_base_ = tree_down_base<T_type_vector,t_level,t_maxLevel>;
    using tree_node_parent = tree_node<T_type_vector,t_level-1,t_maxLevel>;

    friend struct tree_down_base < T_type_vector, t_level-1, t_maxLevel >;
    tree_node(node p, tree_node_parent* pb) : tree_up_base_(p, pb) {}

public:
    void print() const
    {
        tree_up_base_::print();
        tree_down_base_::print();
    }
};
    // tree root specialization
    template < typename T_type_vector, std::size_t t_maxLevel >
    struct tree_node < T_type_vector, 0, t_maxLevel >
        : public tree_all_base <T_type_vector, 0, t_maxLevel>
        , public tree_down_base<T_type_vector, 0, t_maxLevel>
    {
    public:
        /* inherit ctor..... */
        using tree_all_base_ = tree_all_base<T_type_vector,0,t_maxLevel>;
        using tree_down_base_ = tree_down_base<T_type_vector,0,t_maxLevel>;
        using node = typename tree_all_base_ :: node;
        tree_node(node p) : tree_all_base_(p) {}

    public:
        void print() const
        {
            tree_all_base_::print();
            tree_down_base_::print();
        }
    };

    // tree leaf specialization
    template < typename T_type_vector, std::size_t t_maxLevel >
    struct tree_node < T_type_vector, t_maxLevel, t_maxLevel >
        : public tree_up_base <T_type_vector, t_maxLevel, t_maxLevel>
    {
    private:
        /* inherit ctor.... */
        using tree_up_base_ = tree_up_base<T_type_vector,t_maxLevel,t_maxLevel>;
        using node = typename tree_up_base_ :: node;
        using tree_node_parent = tree_node<T_type_vector,t_maxLevel-1,t_maxLevel>;

        friend struct tree_down_base < T_type_vector, t_maxLevel-1, t_maxLevel >;
        tree_node(node p, tree_node_parent* pb) : tree_up_base_(p, pb) {}
    };

template < typename... TP >
tree_node < type_vector<TP...>, 0, sizeof...(TP)-1 >
make_tree_root(typename type_vector<TP...>::template elem<0> node)
{ return {node}; }
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry it took me so long to review and accept this answer, I needed to muster the appropriate spare time and braincells, as it at first appeared somewhat daunting. This is strikingly similar to what I had in mind when I was talking about using inheritance originally, I just was at a loss as to how to do that. It seems this question makes for a good opportunity to showcase of some of the C++11 language additions in your answer. I'm left wondering whether you can even solve this without C++11, actually. I really appreciate the elegance and attention to detail of this answer. Thanks so much! –  mathonnapkins Apr 22 '13 at 8:09
    
@mathonnapkins IIRC, the only unique C++11 features I used are variadic templates, those can be "emulated" using long fixed-size type lists with default "sentinel" arguments (see e.g. boost's metaprogramming libraries). E.g. template < class T0, class T1 = sentinel, class T3 = sentinel /*and so on*/ > struct type_vector; –  dyp Apr 22 '13 at 13:54
    
Well, I don't know if they were essential, but you did use what appeared to me to be 'alias templates' (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%2B%2B11#Alias_templates). I liked the exposition of c++11 features regardless, though. =). –  mathonnapkins Apr 22 '13 at 14:48
    
@mathonnapkins True, but these are only syntactical sugar (removing the ::value and possibly the typename in some contexts). The other name aliases declared by using instead of typedef are easier to read IMO. –  dyp Apr 22 '13 at 15:46
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