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There is Permission Model, which doesn't have related db table, and is used to authorization. With before_filter authorize method creates new permission object, depending on user and optional test_id (another model). The idea is that it checks if test belongs to user, it allows this user delete this test, if no, it cancels transaction. So my initialize method:

class Permission
 def initialize(user, *test_id)
   @user = user
   if !test_id.empty?
     test_id.each do |t|
       test = Test.find_by_id(t)  #finding real test record
       self.instance_variable_set(:"@test_#{t}", test) #should set @test_{id} 
           #an instance of this new permission refering to actual test record
     end
   end
   allow :users, [:new,:create]
   allow :root,[]
   allow :session, [:create, :destroy]
   allow :tests, [:new, :create]
   if !test_id.empty?
     for i in 0...test_id.length
       t = self.instance_variable_get(:"@test_#{i}")  #getting this test record.
       if t.user_id == @user.id
         allow :tests, [:edit,:lock,:unlock, :destroy ]
       end
     end
   end
 end

The problem is that what rails gets from instance_variable_get is nil. So or I set up instance @test_{id} wrong, or get it. Thanks in advance

share|improve this question

The instance variables you set in the top each are of the form @test_{record_id}. The instance variables you get in the for loop are of the form @test_{loop_index}. Just use the same loop as at the top.

test_id.each do |t|
  trec = self.instance_variable_get(:"@test_#{t}")  #getting this test record.
  if trec.user_id == @user.id
    allow :tests, [:edit,:lock,:unlock, :destroy ]
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
yeath, that was one of my mistakes – Joe Half Face Apr 11 '13 at 19:52

You are using the instance variables as a database with the primary key based on the variable name itself. Needless (I think?) to say, this is not a good practice. You can use instance_variable_set to set dynamic instance variable names, but in general, I feel this makes your classes unpredictable, as it is more difficult to keep track of how the behavior is implemented with respect to the data.

If you need to cache a number of objects in your instance, you can use a data structure like an array or a hash, and set that to its own instance variable.

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok, guys, I've just found out, that I overcomplicated things hardly. I really don't need to set or get instance variables in my case, so

if !test_id.empty?
   test_id.each do |t|
   test=Test.find_by_id(t)
   if test.user_id==user.id
     allow :tests, [:edit,:lock,:unlock, :destroy ]
   end
   end
   end

works fine

share|improve this answer
    
You shouldn't ask questions in answers. Delete this question and start over with a new question. – Substantial Apr 11 '13 at 19:45

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