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I have a large object composed of many different properties. I am manipulating this object with four different functions. Each function returns the object. Here is a very short version of my setup:

public class myproject
{
    //many attributes
}

public myproject FunctionOne()
{
    //do some logic.
    //return myproject but only properties 4,5,6
}
public myproject FunctionTwo()
{
    //do some logic.
    //return myproject but only properties 1,2,3
}
public myproject FunctionThree()
{
    //do some logic.
    //return myproject but only properties 1,4,7
}
public myproject FunctionFour()
{
    //do some logic.
    //return myproject but only properties 3,2,5
}

So the issue is, when I return my object, I only want to have certain properties available in that return. Sort of as if I was returning a custom object that was dynamically created simply for that purpose.

What options do I have to accomplish this?

share|improve this question
2  
You could define an interface which has only those properties and your myproject implements those interfaces; FunctionOne might return the object as that subset interface. This won't prevent the caller from subsequently casting to myobject (or the other interfaces) and then accessing the properties if that's an issue. – Chris Sinclair Apr 11 '13 at 19:25
3  
It's a strange request. Mind sharing some context for why you need this behavior? There may be a better way. – JC. Apr 11 '13 at 19:29
3  
why do you need to do this. Knowing why would help us in providing a suitable answer – Sam I am Apr 11 '13 at 19:29
    
I'm creating a web api, and we pull information from our database into a c# object, and use that information to return JSON based on the function called. The issue is that there is a lot of data in those objects that should not be seen unless specifically asked for in the appropriate function so I wanted the ability to only return partial versions of the whole object. – proseidon Apr 11 '13 at 19:33
    
@proseidon Just to confirm: Is this to reduce the data size, to reduce the visibility, or both? If you're serializing it, you'll have to have a concrete class at some point with the data, but I guess you want to avoid writing DTO classes for each return type. – Matthew Watson Apr 11 '13 at 19:35
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're using REST and return JSON you might as well do something like this:

WebApi calls:

public HttpResponseMessage GetOne()
{
    return this.Request.CreateResponse(
        HttpStatusCode.OK,
        FunctionOne());
}
public HttpResponseMessage GetTwo()
{
    return this.Request.CreateResponse(
        HttpStatusCode.OK,
        FunctionTwo());
}

Logic:

public dynamic FunctionOne()
{
    //do some logic.
    //return myproject but only properties 4,5,6
    return new {property4 = "abc", property5 = "xyz", property6 = "123"};
}
public dynamic FunctionTwo()
{
    //do some logic.
    //return myproject but only properties 1,2,3
    return new { property1 = "asdf", property2 = "123", property3 = "aaa" };
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This looks like the closest to what I'm trying to do, I will try to implement it now and update answer. – proseidon Apr 11 '13 at 19:50
    
Honestly, unless you have a bajillion webservice methods to maintain, I think you'd be better off defining static service contracts that are validated at compile time. It prevents accidental or impulsive changes that break the communication contract. Furthermore, you must always be mindful of which methods return what when you (or others!) are maintaining them instead of having a self-documenting and self-validating API. You can always employ helper libraries (like AutoMapper) to help convert to/from the data transfer types. – Chris Sinclair Apr 11 '13 at 19:59
1  
Create good unittest and integration tests to validate your contracts. DTO can change as easily as dynamics if your sloppy. Personally I would go for DTO's for each outcome and use unittests in combination with integration tests. – Ralf de Kleine Apr 11 '13 at 20:05
1  
This answer is the way I chose to go. Please note that while this is the best solution for me and my particular constraints in my project, that it is not the only solution, and I recommend anyone who has a similar problem to check out the lengthy discussions in comments as there is a lot of good information. Thanks. – proseidon Apr 11 '13 at 20:19

If you have control over the code that consumes this object, you could do away with the attributes you mention (presumably properties?), and replace them with a Dictionary containing attribute name/value pairs.

Then, just populate it with the required values at constructor time.

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If a property has a Null value it will be skipped when the object is serialized to Json. So one possible solution would be to use nullable properties.

share|improve this answer
    
The issue is that these properties are not null in the object, they still have data in them, it is just not specifically relevant to that function. I suppose I could set each non-relevant property to null before returning, but I feel like there is a better way to do this – proseidon Apr 11 '13 at 19:38

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