Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two programs, server and client. Server should read a file and then send its content through a named pipe to client. But my server reads only two chars from file, and then exits. What is wrong with this code?

server.c:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#define FIFO_NAME "american_maid"

int main(void)
{
    char line[300];
    int num, fd;
    FILE *fp;
    fp = fopen("out.txt","r");

    mknod(FIFO_NAME, S_IFIFO | 0666, 0);

    printf("waiting for readers...\n");
    fd = open(FIFO_NAME, O_WRONLY);
    printf("got a reader--type some stuff\n");

    while (fgets(line, sizeof(line), fp)) {
        if ((num = write(fd, line, strlen(line))) == -1)
            perror("write");
        else
            printf("speak: wrote %d bytes\n", num);
    }

    fclose(fp);

    return 0;
}

client.c:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#define FIFO_NAME "american_maid"

int main(void)
{
    char s[300];
    int num, fd;

    mknod(FIFO_NAME, S_IFIFO | 0666, 0);

    printf("waiting for writers...\n");
    fd = open(FIFO_NAME, O_RDONLY);
    printf("got a writer\n");

    do {
        if ((num = read(fd, s, 300)) == -1)
            perror("read");
        else {
            s[num] = '\0';
            printf("tick: read %d bytes: \"%s\"\n", num, s);
        }
    } while (num > 0);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
If it reads 300 bytes, client'll write a char past the end of buffer 's'. That isn't the problem you describe. –  Lee Meador Apr 11 '13 at 19:33
    
Sorry my suggestion (not to create the file in the client code) didn't help. I've delete the answer so you get more attention. –  luser droog Apr 11 '13 at 19:43
    
Is the 'current' folder the same for both programs? There is no path on the FIFO filename (e.g. /tmp/american_maid) –  Lee Meador Apr 11 '13 at 19:46
    
nope, they're in the same dir (client, server and american_maid fifo) –  yak Apr 11 '13 at 19:49
1  
Check that your open() calls worked. Note that if you read 300 bytes in the client, writing to s[num] writes beyond the end of your array; it might mess up the number of bytes of data that's read. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 11 '13 at 20:16

2 Answers 2

When I run the code shown below using the command sequence:

$ ln -s server.c out.txt
$ ./client &
$ ./server
$

I get a copy of the source code printed by the client program. Similarly when I run the commands using:

$ ./server &
$ ./client
$

The revised code is not modified all that significantly. It avoids do { } while(...) loops — they're so seldom really beneficial — and is very careful about not overflowing buffers. The code also has superfluous headers removed.

server.c

#include <fcntl.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#define FIFO_NAME "american_maid"

int main(void)
{
    const char infile[] = "out.txt";
    FILE *fp = fopen(infile, "r");

    if (fp == 0)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Failed to open %s for reading", infile);
        return(1);
    }

    mknod(FIFO_NAME, S_IFIFO | 0666, 0);

    printf("waiting for readers...\n");
    int fd = open(FIFO_NAME, O_WRONLY);
    if (fd > 0)
    {
        char line[300];
        printf("got a reader--type some stuff\n");

        while (fgets(line, sizeof(line), fp))
        {
            int len = strlen(line);
            int num = write(fd, line, len);
            if (num != len)
                perror("write");
            else
                printf("speak: wrote %d bytes\n", num);
        }
        close(fd);
    }

    fclose(fp);

    return 0;
}

client.c

#include <fcntl.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#define FIFO_NAME "american_maid"

int main(void)
{
    const char outfile[] = "client.out";
    FILE *fp = fopen(outfile, "w");

    if (fp == 0)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Failed to open %s for writing\n", outfile);
        return 1;
    }

    printf("waiting for writers...\n");
    mknod(FIFO_NAME, S_IFIFO | 0666, 0);

    int fd = open(FIFO_NAME, O_RDONLY);
    if (fd > 0)
    {
        int num;
        char s[300];
        printf("got a writer\n");

        while ((num = read(fd, s, sizeof(s))) > 0)
        {
            printf("tick: read %d bytes: \"%.*s\"\n", num, num, s);
            fprintf(fp, "%.*s", num, s);
        }

        close(fd);
    }
    fclose(fp);

    return 0;
}

Note that this version writes its output to file client.out; even when given a file with some very long lines to process (2049 bytes including the newline at the end), the output in client.out exactly matches the input in out.txt.

share|improve this answer

Remove the line mknod(FIFO_NAME, S_IFIFO | 0666, 0); from the file client.c. Then the program will work as expected. Server will create a file and sent the content of the file to fifo.

share|improve this answer
    
did it already, didnt help (the problem is the same after I commented this line in client code) –  yak Apr 11 '13 at 19:52
    
Actually, having both programs try to create exactly the same file isn't a bad thing, it means either can start first -- and ignoring the mknod return means he can just make a regular file there. It's not usual, but it's not bad, either, in this case. –  jthill Apr 11 '13 at 20:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.