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Is there any tool for javascript commenting as it is in c# like ghost doc.

/// <summary>
///   Method to calculate distance between two points
/// </summary>
/// <param name="pointA">First point</param>
/// <param name="pointB">Second point</param>
function calculatePointDistance(pointA, pointB)
 { 
    ... 
 }

there any tool to automatically add the comments like above. like in c# code ghost doc did:

/// <summary>
///   Method to calculate distance between two points
/// </summary>
/// <param name="pointA">First point</param>
/// <param name="pointB">Second point</param>
private void calculatePointDistance(pointA, pointB)
{
  .....
}

i want to do the similar in Client side ,javascript

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On Ghostdoc blog there's direct answer from team member that they do not and are not planning to support JavaScript. Anyway - autodocumentig is evil, you much better putting some manual effort in making your code documented –  Bostone Oct 20 '09 at 17:02
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5 Answers

Yes (but more like Javadoc) - look at JSDoc Basically you use Javadoc-like special syntax in your comments e.g. @param like in the following example and then parser will generate good looking HTML output for you

/**
* Shape is an abstract base class. It is defined simply
* to have something to inherit from for geometric 
* subclasses
* @constructor
*/
function Shape(color){
    this.color = color;
}
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1  
He's after a Visual Studio plugin that would automate XML documentation creation. GhostDoc creates documentation stubs so devs don't have to write all by themselves. (-1 from me)... –  Robert Koritnik Oct 20 '09 at 20:37
1  
And what's your point? If you read my comment - Ghostdoc will not do it for him - so I'm providing the guy with a valuable alternative. Or you just enjoy it? –  Bostone Oct 20 '09 at 21:22
    
He's after a third party addin that would work similarly to GhostDoc but for Javascript. GhostDoc won't support JS in the first place which doesn't mean that somebody else won't. The idea is to get an addin that adds XML documentation for Javascript so we don't have to manually type in all XML elements but rather just their values (and types). –  Robert Koritnik Jan 27 at 12:02
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The short answer is no, there is nothing that automates the documentation. The closes you get is manually adding comments with something like jsdoc-toolkit that allows building the documentation into html pages.

There is intellisense documentation for javascript for javascript as well, which looks like this (notice it is inside the function though)

function example(string myParameter){
    /// <summary>This is an example function</summary>
    /// <param name="myParameter" type="String">All your string are belong to us.</param>
    /// <returns type="Boolean" />

   return !!myParameter;
}

You can also create snippets for javascript files. I would just create a few snippets filling out common documentations (any type you prefer) and then you can just type the snippet and it will fill in most of the documentation for you.

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I haven't personally used it, but jsdoc-toolkit seems to be what you're after.

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I haven't used it for JavaScript, but Doxygen has a filter that allows it to (at least to some extent) be used to document JavaScript. It might be worth looking into, especially if you are using other languages that are also supported by Doxygen, so you can have one tool for everything.

It appears that JSUnit uses Doxygen for its documentation.

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Ya, I tried that but I never got that filter to work :( –  Justin Johnson Oct 21 '09 at 0:48
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Sandcastle appears to support JavaScript as well, see http://blogs.msdn.com/sandcastle/archive/2007/06/28/scriptdoc-1-0-for-extractiong-javascript-code-comments-is-now-available-at-codeplex.aspx. I use it for C# since the NDoc project is toast, but haven't tried it for JavaScript yet. I used to use JSDoc mentioned above.

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