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I have a class with 2 date properties: FirstDay and LastDay. LastDay is nullable. I would like to generate a string in the format of "x year(s) y day(s)". If the total years are less than 1, I would like to omit the year section. If the total days are less than 1, I would like to omit the day section. If either years or days are 0, they should say "day/year", rather than "days/years" respectively.

Examples:
2.2 years:             "2 years 73 days"
1.002738 years:   "1 year 1 day"
0.2 years:             "73 days"
2 years:                "2 years"

What I have works, but it is long:

private const decimal DaysInAYear = 365.242M;

public string LengthInYearsAndDays
{
    get
    {
        var lastDay = this.LastDay ?? DateTime.Today;
        var lengthValue = lastDay - this.FirstDay;

        var builder = new StringBuilder();

        var totalDays = (decimal)lengthValue.TotalDays;
        var totalYears = totalDays / DaysInAYear;
        var years = (int)Math.Floor(totalYears);

        totalDays -= (years * DaysInAYear);
        var days = (int)Math.Floor(totalDays);

        Func<int, string> sIfPlural = value =>
            value > 1 ? "s" : string.Empty;

        if (years > 0)
        {
            builder.AppendFormat(
                CultureInfo.InvariantCulture,
                "{0} year{1}",
                years,
                sIfPlural(years));

            if (days > 0)
            {
                builder.Append(" ");
            }
        }

        if (days > 0)
        {
            builder.AppendFormat(
                CultureInfo.InvariantCulture,
                "{0} day{1}",
                days,
                sIfPlural(days));
        }

        var length = builder.ToString();
        return length;
    }
}

Is there a more concise way of doing this (but still readable)?

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2  
codereview.stackexchange.com –  Kashif Apr 11 '13 at 20:14
    
Cool, I didn't know about that site. –  Dan Apr 11 '13 at 20:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 21 down vote accepted

A TimeSpan doesn't have a sensible concept of "years" because it depends on the start and end point. (Months is similar - how many months are there in 29 days? Well, it depends...)

To give a shameless plug, my Noda Time project makes this really simple though:

using System;
using NodaTime;

public class Test
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        LocalDate start = new LocalDate(2010, 6, 19);
        LocalDate end = new LocalDate(2013, 4, 11);
        Period period = Period.Between(start, end,
                                       PeriodUnits.Years | PeriodUnits.Days);

        Console.WriteLine("Between {0} and {1} are {2} years and {3} days",
                          start, end, period.Years, period.Days);
    }
}

Output:

Between 19 June 2010 and 11 April 2013 are 2 years and 296 days
share|improve this answer
4  
And you can definitely trust Jon's expertise on times and dates –  JDB Apr 11 '13 at 20:23

I wouldn't do this with a TimeSpan. Date math gets tricky as soon as you go beyond days because the number of days in a month and days in a year is no longer constant. It's likely why TimeSpan does not contain properties for Years and Months. I would instead determine the number of years/months/days, etc between the two DateTime values and display the results accordingly.

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1  
That said, it looks like the OP has settled on a sufficient compromise (for his purposes): 365.242M days per year. –  JDB Apr 11 '13 at 20:15
    
There aren't 365.242 days in a year. Some years have 365 days, some have 366. There are 365.242 in an average year, which won't work if you're comparing two specific dates. If all that was available was the number of days (which is the bast TimeSpan can do), then it would be a decent estimate but could be off by one day in certain cases. –  D Stanley Apr 11 '13 at 20:25
1  
I agree with you, I'm just sayin' for a non-public, personal project, precision may (legitimately) take a backseat to convenience. –  JDB Apr 11 '13 at 20:27
1  
I was actually using this to calculate the interest on the national debt. –  Dan Apr 11 '13 at 20:30
1  
Cool! Can you mail me the check for the rounding difference? ;) –  D Stanley Apr 11 '13 at 20:32
public string GetAgeText(DateTime birthDate)
{
        const double ApproxDaysPerMonth = 30.4375;
        const double ApproxDaysPerYear = 365.25;

        /*
           The above are the average days per month/year over a normal 4 year period. 
           We use these approximations because they are more accurate for the next century or so.  
           After that you may want to switch over to these 400 year approximations... 

           ApproxDaysPerMonth = 30.436875
           ApproxDaysPerYear  = 365.2425 

          How to get theese numbers:
            The are 365 days in a year, unless it is a leepyear.
            Leepyear is every forth year if Year % 4 = 0
            unless year % 100 == 1
            unless if year % 400 == 0 then it is a leep year.

            This gives us 97 leep years in 400 years. 
            So 400 * 365 + 97 = 146097 days.
            146097 / 400      = 365.2425
            146097 / 400 / 12 = 30,436875

            Due to the nature of the leepyear calculation, on this side of the year 2100
            you can assume every 4th year is a leepyear and use the other approximatiotions. 


        */
    //Calculate the span in days
    int iDays = (DateTime.Now - birthDate).Days;

    //Calculate years as an integer division
    int iYear = (int)(iDays / ApproxDaysPerYear);

    //Decrease remaing days
    iDays -= (int)(iYear * ApproxDaysPerYear);

    //Calculate months as an integer division
    int iMonths = (int)(iDays / ApproxDaysPerMonth);

    //Decrease remaing days
    iDays -= (int)(iMonths * ApproxDaysPerMonth);

    //Return the result as an string   
    return string.Format("{0} years, {1} months, {2} days", iYear, iMonths, iDays);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please comment your code. –  Martin Prikryl Jan 21 at 14:24
1  
@martin Done :) –  Jens Borrisholt Jan 27 at 9:10

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