Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am just wondering how to control console inputs in separate threads?
I have thread A and thread B and thread C; B and C they both control user input... the thing is I am not pretty sure how to switch between B and C threads the scanIn.nextLine(); because B seems to loop two unnecessary iterations before thread C can interrupt B :(

Main thread:

  public class Main
        {
            private volatile ThreadGroup threadGroup=new ThreadGroup();//contains concurrent hash map...
            private volatile TaskManager taskManager=new TaskManager(threadGroup);
            private A a=new A(threadGroup);
            private B b=new B(threadGroup,taskManager);
            private C c=new C(threadGroup);


     Main()
    {

      b.start();

      threadGroup.add(a,"A");
      threadGroup.add(b,"B");
      threadGroup.add(c,"C");
    }

    public static void main(String args[]){new Main();}

        }

TaskManager method snippet:

...
public synchronized void threadCMaybeCanBeStartedLater()
{
      this.getThreadGroup().get("A").start(); 
}
...

thread A code like a (overridden run method invokes):

public void loopIt()
{
   Random generator = new Random(); 
   A: while(!this.interrupted())
{
   Thread.sleep(1000);

   int i=generator.nextInt(100)+1;
   int j=generator.nextInt(100)+1;
   if(i==j){this.invokeC(); System.out.println("event : i==j");}

    }
 }

private void invokeC()
{
  if(!this.getThreadGroup().get("C").isAlive())this.getThreadGroup().get("C").start(); 
}

thread B code like a:

public void loopIt() throws InterruptedException
    {


        Scanner scanIn = new Scanner(System.in);

        B: while(!this.isInterrupted())
        {

            Thread.sleep(1000);

            String command= scanIn.nextLine();
...

         if(command.equals("a"))
        {   
            System.out.println("a was entered");
            this.getTaskManager().threadCMaybeCanBeStartedLater();//             
            continue;
        }
        if(command.equals("b"))
        {   
           System.out.println("b was entered");            
           continue;
        }
        if(command.equals("c"))
        {
            System.out.println("c was entered");
            continue;
        }
        else{System.out.println("no such command");}

    }

}

thread C (the run method invokes)

public void loopIt() throws InterruptedException
        {
            getThreadGroup().get("B").interrupt();

            Scanner scanIn = new Scanner(System.in);

            C: while(!this.isInterrupted())
            {

                Thread.sleep(1000);

                String command= scanIn.nextLine();
    ...

             if(command.equals("d"))
            {   
                System.out.println("d was entered");             
                continue;
            }
            if(command.equals("e"))
            {   
               System.out.println("e was entered");            
               this.interrupt();
               break C;
            }
            if(command.equals("f"))
            {
                System.out.println("f was entered");
                continue;
            }
            else{System.out.println("no such command");}

        }

       getThreadGroup().get("B").start();

    }

...as you can see, the major code conception (see A thread snippet) is "you don't know when thread C can be started but when it started you need to give it console"; that's all; if it was GUI there was no problem but console-like app makes it quite problematic...

So the question is ... how to interrupt/re-start thread B immediately from thread C in this case?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
I think you posted A twice. –  Nathaniel Waisbrot Apr 11 '13 at 21:03
1  
I have no idea what the point of this code is. –  Nathaniel Waisbrot Apr 15 '13 at 3:42
2  
Oh my... it is obvious; The code is testing an ability of some incoming event 'injection' (in this case Thread A plays the role) ; If something happens in thread A then it takes console from thread B for thread C; the major problem there is no ability to inject the event because Scanner blocks forever or something :( I actually suspect the System.in static nature as well but I am not sure... So maybe I shouldn't use Scanner and there is an alt console input solution or maybe there is a more optimal way to control user input... –  user592704 Apr 15 '13 at 4:20
    
you can try the solution from here: stackoverflow.com/questions/19130822/… where i have fixed (worked around) the problem with interrupting System.in read operation not being able to get interrupted unless user presses enter. –  Claudiu Oct 2 '13 at 7:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+25

Synchronising Threads Using Thread Class

  1. Thread.interrupt() on its own does not synchronise logic & timing between two threads.

    Thread.interrupt() signals that the caller would like the thread to interrupt at a time in the near future. The interrupt() method sets an interrupt flag. The isInterrupted() method checks whether this flag is set (& also clears the flag again). The methods Thread.sleep(), Thread.join(), Object.wait() and a number of I/O methods also check & clear this flag, when throwing InterruptedException.

    The thread doesn't immediately pause but continues running code. The internal thread logic is designed & implemented by the developer: continue to run thread code considered atomic/urgent until it gets to an "interruptable point", then check the interrupted flag / catch InterruptedException & then do a clean pause - usually via Thread.sleep(), Thread.join() or Object.wait(), and sometimes by exiting Thread.run() altogether thus stopping the thread permanently.

    While all of this is happening the calling thread is still running and will execute an indeterminate amount of code before the interrupt takes effect... hence the lack of synchronisation. There is a lack of guaranteed happens-before condition between the code in one thread and code in the other thread.

  2. Some approaches that do synchronise logic & timing between two threads (creating a happens-before condition):

    • thread1 calls Thread2.join()

    • thread1 calls SomeObject.wait() and thread2 calls SomeObject.notify()

    • Synchronise on a method or block

Quick Review of Your Code:

  1. Thread B runs in an infinite loop - there is no call to interrupt it from any thread and no call for it's thread to wait(). It will, however, temporily block until System.in has more input, and then continue.
  2. Thread A only interrupts itself - cleaner and easier to analyse logic if you don't call this.interrupt() and while(!this.isInterrupted()): just change the while loop into: do { .... } while (i != j)
  3. Thread A only interrupts itself - cleaner and much easier to analyse logic if you don't call this.interrupt() and while(!this.isInterrupted()): just change the while loop into: do { .... } while (!"e".equals(command))
  4. Thread C must make the following calls at the top of it's while loop:

     threadB.interrupt();
     synchronized(this) {
         try {
             this.wait();
         } catch (InterruptedException ie) {
         }
    
  5. Thread B must make the following call as the last line of code:

     synchronized(threadC) {
             threadC.notify();
     }
    
  6. Reading from I/O (nextLine()) is a blocking & interruptable operation. Right next to it you introduce Thread.sleep() which is also a blocking & interruptable operation that introduces an artificial delay in your code - it is not necessary; remove.

  7. The only Scanner method you call is nextLine(). You're using it as if it were an InputStreamReader & not doing any scanning. Also, you're not buffering input. If code stays like this, replace 'Scanner scanIn = Scanner(System.in)' with: 'BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in))'.
  8. The only ThreadGroup method you call are add() and get(). You're using it as if it were a HashMap & not doing any thread group management. If code stays like this, you may replace 'ThreadGroup' with 'HashMap'. However, even the HashMap seems excessive - could simply pass Threads references to other Threads using constructors/setters and avoid HashMap altogether.
  9. Avoid excessive use of continue inside loops - try to avoid altogether. Best to do this by chaining successive 'if' statements together using '} else if {'...
  10. Potential race condition between main thread and thread B. When thread B is started (from Main()) it may execute many lines of code before the main thread executes any more code - B may call ThreadGroup.get() before main thread has called ThreadGroup.add() x 3. Solution: in Main(), put b.start() after ThreadGroup.add() x 3
  11. In general, "a".equals(command) is better practice than command.equals("a") - it handles nulls, giving correct result without NPE (you seem lucky here - probably won't have nulls).

Suggested Changes:

public class ThreadA extends Thread {

    ThreadC threadC;

    public void setThreadC(ThreadC threadC) {
        this.threadC = threadC;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        this.loopIt();
    }

    public void loopIt() {
        Random generator = new Random(); 
        int i, j;
        do {
            try { 
                Thread.sleep(1000);
            } catch (InterruptedException ie) {                
            }
            i=generator.nextInt(100)+1;
            j=generator.nextInt(100)+1;
        } while (i != j);
        threadC.start();
    }

}
public class ThreadB extends Thread {

    ThreadA threadA;
    ThreadC threadC;

    public void setThreadA(ThreadA threadA) {
        this.threadA = threadA;
    }
    public void setThreadC(ThreadC threadC) {
        this.threadC = threadC;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        this.loopIt();
    }

    public void loopIt() {
        BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
        String command = null;
        // loop until interrupted
        try {
            while (!this.isInterrupted()) {
                command = reader.readLine();
                if ("a".equals(command)) {   
                    System.out.println("a was entered");
                    if (threadA.getState() == Thread.State.NEW) {
                        threadA.start();
                    }
                } else if ("b".equals(command)) {   
                    System.out.println("b was entered");            
                } else if ("c".equals(command)) {
                    System.out.println("c was entered");
                } else if ("z".equals(command)) {
                    System.out.println("z was entered");
                    throw new InterruptedException("Command z interruption");
                } else {
                    System.out.println("no such command");
                }
            }
        } catch (IOException ioe) {
            ioe.printStackTrace();
        } catch (InterruptedException ie) {
        }
        // Now notify ThreadC - it will wait() until this code is run
        synchronized(threadC) {
            threadC.notify();
        }
    }
}

public class ThreadC extends Thread {

    ThreadB threadB;

    public void setThreadB(ThreadB threadB) {
        this.threadB = threadB;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
            this.loopIt();
   }

    public void loopIt() {
        // Block until the lock can be obtained
        // We want thread B to run first, so the lock should be passed into Thread C constructor in an already locked state
        threadB.interrupt();
        synchronized(this) {
            try {
                // Put this thread to sleep until threadB calls threadC.notify().
                //
                // Note: could replace this line with threadB.join() - and remove  
                // from threadB the call to threadC.notify()
                this.wait();
            } catch (InterruptedException ie) {
            }
            BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
            String command = null;
            while (!"e".equals(command)) {
                try {
                    command= reader.readLine();
                    if ("d".equals(command)) {   
                        System.out.println("d was entered");             
                    } else if ("e".equals(command)) {    
                        System.out.println("e was entered");            
                    } else if ("f".equals(command)) {
                        System.out.println("f was entered");
                    } else if ("z".equals("command")) {
                        System.out.println("z was entered");
                    } else { 
                        System.out.println("no such command");
                    };
                } catch (IOException ioe) {
                    ioe.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
        }        
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It is quite interesting. Thank you. You suggest architecture changes but I don't see the thread A supposed modifications; I mean 'how thread A should start thread C (the invokeC() method) in a more optimal way then according to the newly suggested modifications' or you mean the thread A code should be unchanged? As you can see, the basic conception is thread B gets command "a" to switch on 'thread C random starting timer' (the thread A plays as a random starter) so it is the most interesting point; so could you give more details please –  user592704 Apr 17 '13 at 17:00
    
Added a possible version of ThreadA. –  Glen Best Apr 18 '13 at 1:08
    
ThreadA is interesting. I am just wondering how do you suggest to put all parts together with the main thread then? –  user592704 Apr 18 '13 at 16:30
    
See my review comments. Unfortunately, I can't write every single line of code for you. :^) –  Glen Best Apr 19 '13 at 1:10
    
I understand :) I am just don't get are the ThreadA and ThreadC (see ThreadB snippet) volatile in the main thread or not for example? And I am thinking... you suggested stop ThreadA when i==j but what if "I would like NOT TO stop it when i==j? and make it NOT TO stop itself but always loop and react somehow on i==j?" I mean to make ThreadA a some kind of endless "event listener"? The event occur in my test case "when i==j"... I've edited the ThreadA snippet to clear the conception –  user592704 Apr 21 '13 at 2:42

nextLine() does not respond to interruption. You want to do something like

String command;
if (scanIn.hasNextLine())
    command = scanIn.nextLine();
else
    Thread.sleep(1000);
share|improve this answer
    
I know that; I mean how to interrupt/re-start thread A immediately from thread B? –  user592704 Apr 11 '13 at 20:36
    
@user592704 I'm not sure what you're asking, then. Are you saying that you can't control precisely when B's call to interrupt A gets noticed? That's the nature of concurrency. You'll need to use locks or volatile or some other construct if you need them synchronized. –  Nathaniel Waisbrot Apr 11 '13 at 20:41
    
No I can control when to interrupt but the interruption comes not at once :( ... when B calls something like mythreads.getA().interrupt() sure : 1) A 'maybe still' sleeps 2) A is waiting for input 'so I input' 3) and only then A is interrupted and B takes the console :S The thing I want thread A work as it is untill I need thread B to take console. So you saying I must synch some points ? give more details please –  user592704 Apr 11 '13 at 20:54
    
Did you try my answer? It sounds like it is what you are looking for. In your example, A is waiting for input when it gets the interrupt(). Because scanner doesn't watch for interruption, it will block forever. When you press enter, control jumps to your while condition and it notices the interruption. The solution to this, as I posted, is to not block waiting for input. Try my solution and then explain how it doesn't meet your needs. –  Nathaniel Waisbrot Apr 11 '13 at 21:02
    
yes, you are right. It seems like scanner is blocking forever or something so it pretty hard to have two scanIn.nextLine(); invoke at a time so that's why I ask how to close 'cancel' it manually or something :) –  user592704 Apr 11 '13 at 21:06

You can use flag variables (as global variables) to control the while loop in each thread...

suppose that Thread A has an infinite loop like this

while(true)
 while(x == 1){
   your code ...
 }
  Thread.sleep(2000);
}

when Thread b is started you can change x to 0 (suppose x is a global variable) then when Thread b finishes executing change x to 1 at the end of Thread b code...

or you can interrupt the thread from thread itself based of flag value x

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.