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In response to my question Scala macro to short-circuit null in long chain of accessors? someone pointed me to an earlier long thread with many answers, the most compelling of which to was http://stackoverflow.com/a/5569905 . But it doesn't quite work with Scala AnyVal "primitives" like Int:

object TestOp {

  class SafeDereference[A](obj: A) {
    def ?[B >: Null](function: A => B): B = if (obj == null) null else function(obj)
  }
  implicit def safeDereference[A](obj: A) = new SafeDereference(obj)

  class C { 
    def getValue: Int = 0                     
  }

  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    val c = new C
    val x:Int = c ? (_.getValue)
  }
}

gives a compilation error of:

[error] TestOp.scala:14: type mismatch;
[error]  found   : Any
[error]  required: Int
[error]     val x:Int = c ? (_.getValue)
[error]                   ^
[error] one error found
[error] {file:/home/mmalak/streaming-demo/}default-ae36bd/compile:compile: Compilation failed

A workaround is to replace val x:Int with val x:java.lang.Integer, and that will compile. Is there a way to improve SafeDereference above so that val x:Int is allowed?

Additional information

The following produces the desired output. The question now becomes how to move the typecasts into SafeDereference, and how to handle all the other Scala "primitives" (Boolean etc).

object TestOp {

  class SafeDereference[A](obj: A) {
    def ?[B >: Null](function: A => B): B = if (obj == null) null else function(obj)
  }
  implicit def safeDereference[A](obj: A) = new SafeDereference(obj)

  class C { 
    def getValue: Int = 0                     
  }

  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    val c:C = null
    val x = (c ? (_.getValue)).asInstanceOf[java.lang.Integer].asInstanceOf[Int]
    println("x="+x)
  }
}

outputs, as desired:

x=0
share|improve this question
    
Int is not a reference type per se (that's why it inherits from AnyVal not AnyRef) and normally is not nullable –  om-nom-nom Apr 11 '13 at 21:52
    
What should c ? (_.getValue) return if c == null? –  EECOLOR Apr 11 '13 at 21:58
    
"Scala AnyRef primitive" is a contradiction in terms. –  Randall Schulz Apr 11 '13 at 22:20
    
Randall: typo, corrected to AnyVal in my original question. –  Michael Malak Apr 11 '13 at 22:21
    
EECOLOR: Added second example to original question, showing desired output for c == null, and a long (undesired) way to achieve it. –  Michael Malak Apr 11 '13 at 22:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could do something like this. The Zero trait allows you to determine the zero value for any object that is not nullable. In this case I added one for Numeric types:

object TestOp {

  trait Zero[T] {
    def apply(): T
  }

  object Zero {
    implicit def zeroNull[B >: Null] =
      new Zero[B] { def apply = null }

    implicit def zeroNumeric[B: Numeric] =
      new Zero[B] { def apply = implicitly[Numeric[B]].zero }
  }

  implicit class SafeDereference[A](obj: A) {
    def ?[B](function: A => B)(implicit zero: Zero[B]): B =
      if (obj == null) zero() else function(obj)
  }

  class C {
    def getValue: Int = 0
    def getSomething: C = new C
  }

  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    val c = new C
    val x = c ? (_.getValue)
    val y = c ? (_.getSomething)
  }
}

Edit

For Boolean you would add something like this:

implicit def zeroBoolean[B >: Boolean] =
  new Zero[B] { def apply = false }
share|improve this answer
    
Great! How to also default Boolean to false? –  Michael Malak Apr 11 '13 at 22:38

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