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What are good arguments to convince others to comment their code?

I notice many programmers favor the perceived speed of writing code without comments over leaving some documentation for themselves and others. When I try to convince them I get to hear half baked stuff like "the method/class name should say what it does" etc. What would you say to them to change their minds?

If you are against commenting, you please just leave comments. This should be a resource for people trying to convince people to comment the code, not otherwise. :-)

Other related questions are: Commenting code, Do you comment your code and How would you like your comments.

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closed as not constructive by casperOne Jul 26 '12 at 12:43

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39 Answers 39

Only employ good engineers who ensure their code implicitly states the intention (using comments and otherwise). Anyone who wants a job will have to do it right. Harsh, but fair, IMHO.

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I am also in the camp of less comments the better, and in order for that to work it requires clear concise code that is to the point. So that is where i would start with them. Tell them they dont have to comment, as long as they write better, clearer, self commenting code.

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Only put comments in when you absolutely need to, when it is not clear why the code is doing what it is doing.

e.g. If you have a comment above a dozen lines of code then just refactor into a method using a good name for the method or just add the comment to aove the method

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Almost a rhetorical question. Really good coders actually do not need many comments. Unfortunately there are precious few of these. So you're telling people their code will not be readable without comments.

Programmers hardly ever get enough time to do a pretty job. It seems like we're always in a headlong rush to get something to unit test to see if it's going to start spitting out results. So my final answer would be to find a workplace that has an atmosphere that makes it possible for an average programmer to have time for quality. Me, I've applied with Google twice and got rejected twice.

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I've never in ten years of development seen a comment that actually told me something useful about the code. Comments are usually out of date or state the obvious. As soon as you write them it's one more thing to maintain. I think the only reasonable thing to comment would be a regular expression or perhaps assembler code.

If you need a comment chances are you need to pull out what you wanted to comment into a separate method or class. Another way to document your code is to write tests.

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While commenting can be used well to provide insight into the code I would argue that it is MORE valuable to encourage programmers to write descriptive code than to leave comments. Writing smaller methods with clear names and signatures will serve you better in the end than long rambling comments explaining code that could have been written better to begin with.

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It's a sad fact that the overwhelming majority of programmers won't comment their code properly until they end up on the other side of bad documentation. Being stuck maintaining an app lacking clear comments is just awful. Usually right after that (IME), comments in the code flow.

Yes, this happened to me and I comment thoroughly now.

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I also think the best way to show developers how important good comments are is to show him his own code from the past.

Also show them the advantage of something like SandCastle.

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Not sure why all other answers talk about "convincing" programmers to write comments. With animals and children we use positive reinforcement, but with adults we use logic, as if that works (it doesn't).

Give them a cookie every time they write a comment -- e.g., a real cookie, or a "man that's great" -- and see how that works. If you must, there's always punishment for not writing comments. You don't have to be the boss to punish, of course: public ridicule, scorn, and general exclusion are strong enough techniques.

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