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How should I implement the classic bubble sort algorithm? I'd particularly like to see a C++ implementation, but any language (even pseudocode) would be helpful.

P.S. Not a homework.

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14  
Homework or not, this is a bad question. What have you read? What have you tried? Which specific element of algorithm do you have a question about? –  mjv Oct 20 '09 at 17:02
4  
Bubble-sort is never used in the "real world", only in homework. It is well described in many places on the web, so by asking the question, you are indicating you haven't even attempted the problem. Downvote. –  abelenky Oct 20 '09 at 17:59
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@abelenky - and do you want to add members to this community or push them away? Everyone starts at 0. True, some things are gained through experience, but an Answer or Question from someone with a score of 1 could be just as good as one from someone with 100k. –  Aaron Hoffman Oct 20 '09 at 18:37
1  
Completeness and clutter go hand in hand. SO should be an encyclopedia of practical, real-world programming knowledge. Toward that end, if someone has a question about real-world sorting, the last thing they want in an SO search is a ton of frivolous questions about bubble sort. –  Kennet Belenky Oct 20 '09 at 18:51
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FYI -- there is a "Bubble Sort in 29 languages" external link in the linked Wikipedia article that includes C++... –  Austin Salonen Oct 20 '09 at 19:01
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6 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Wikipedia provides two pseudocode implementations of the bubble sort:

procedure bubbleSort( A : list of sortable items ) defined as:
  do
    swapped := false
    for each i in 0 to length(A) - 1 inclusive do:
      if A[i] > A[i+1] then
        swap( A[i], A[i+1] )
        swapped := true
      end if
    end for
  while swapped
end procedure

and

procedure bubbleSort( A : list of sortable items ) defined as:
  n := length( A )
  do
    swapped := false
    for each i in 0 to n - 1  inclusive do:
      if A[ i ] > A[ i + 1 ] then
        swap( A[ i ], A[ i + 1 ] )
        swapped := true
      end if
    end for
    n := n - 1
  while swapped
end procedure
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http://www.sorting-algorithms.com/ contains a number of algorithms, examples, and pseudocode.

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Great link, good post. –  fastcodejava May 12 '10 at 9:57
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Here is an implementation of bubble sort in c and one in c++. And here is an implementation in pseudocode.

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There are 59 implementations in different languages at rosettacode.com at the moment of this writing.

This is the great algorithm to implement in different languages, recently I've tried to implement it in J, and I suspected there can be a shorter implementation (though I haven't created my own yet). It allows you to find out which means language provides you to solve different kind of problems. So before watching on real examples try to implement your own version, I'm sure you'll like it.

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Wikipedia actually covers most of the fundamental algorithms rather well, and google knows everything, so, without being snarky, those really are good places to start.

You can get extra credit by implementing the only-slightly-more-complicated but much superior cocktail sort. Don't actually use either one in a real program, though.

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Here's a hastily written C# (and could be Java) version. I'm sure it could be improved, and I've avoided LINQ so you can convert it.

int[] items = {1,2,5,2,5,9,2,3};
int[] sorted =  (int[]) items.Clone();

for (int i =0;i < items.Length -1;i++)
{
    for (int j=0;j < items.Length -1;j++)
    {
        if (sorted[j] > sorted[j+1])
        {
            int item = sorted[j];
            sorted[j] = sorted[j +1];
            sorted[j+1] = item;
        }   
    }
}

foreach (int number in sorted)
{
    Console.WriteLine(number);
}
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