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I have the following statement.

"In TCP, the receiver host uses all of source IP, source port, destination IP and destination port to direct datagram to appropriate socket. While in UDP, the receiver only checks destination port number to direct the datagram. "

Is the above statement true?

If yes, does it mean that in TCP the same port can be used for multiple socket in one process, while in UDP only one socket can use on a port in one process? What about sockets in different processes? Can multiple processes use the same port in TCP/UDP? (in programming language: C/C++/Java)

If not, why?

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

"In TCP, the receiver host uses all of source IP, source port, destination IP and destination port to direct datagram to appropriate socket. While in UDP, the receiver only checks destination port number to direct the datagram. "

Is the above statement true?

Yes.

If yes, does it mean that in TCP the same port can be used for multiple socket in one process,

Yes, under some circumstances.

while in UDP only one socket can use on a port in one process?

No, see below.

What about sockets in different processes? Can multiple processes use the same port in TCP/UDP? (in programming language: C/C++/Java)

Under some circumstances, yes. A UDP port has to be designated as reusable by all processes that want to share it. A TCP port can only be reused by sockets bound to different interfaces: there is no sharing.

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What does it mean by saying "A UDP port has to be designated as reusable by all processes that want to share it." ? Is it possible to make two different processes bind to the same port number at same time? –  Alex Apr 11 '13 at 23:13
    
It means they all have to set the SO_REUSEADDR option on the socket before binding. –  EJP Apr 11 '13 at 23:17
    
I did some search and found that SO_REUSEADDR option is also available in TCP. So, in TCP, this option will simply kill the socket which previously bind to the same IP & port? Also, is the option OS dependent? (only allowed in Unix?) –  Alex Apr 11 '13 at 23:40
    
@Alex No. It will allow a new TCP socket to be bound to a port that is currently in TIME_WAIT state. TCP and UDP are very different. I'm not aware of any operating systems that don't support SO_REUSEADDR. –  EJP Apr 12 '13 at 0:33
    
You mentioned that "A TCP port can only be reused by sockets bound to different interfaces: there is no sharing.". Can you explain a little bit more? What does "different interfaces" mean? If two different processes on the same IP can bound to the same TCP port, would not that mean sharing? –  Alex Apr 12 '13 at 0:47
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What that means is, in TCP, a unique communication "channel" can be described as the four-tuple: (src-ip, src-port, dst-ip, dst-port).

In UDP, all packets destined to a certain port are delivered to the only UDP socket listening on that port, regardless of the source address and port of said packet. I like to think of it as a funnel.

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