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I have 4 tables:

Table talks
table talks_fan
table talks_follow
table talks_comments

What I'm trying to achieve is counting all comments, fans, followers for every single talk.

I came up with this so far.

All tables have talk_id and only in talks table is a primary key

SELECT
  g. *, 
  COUNT( m.talk_id ) AS num_of_comments,
  COUNT( f.talk_id ) AS num_of_followers

FROM
  talks AS g

LEFT JOIN talks_comments AS m
  USING ( talk_id )

LEFT JOIN talks_follow AS f
  USING ( talk_id )

WHERE g.privacy = 'public'
GROUP BY g.talk_id
ORDER BY g.created_date DESC 
LIMIT 30;

I also tried using this method

SELECT
  t.*,
  COUNT(b.talk_id) AS comments, 
  COUNT(bt.talk_id) AS followers 
FROM
  talks t
LEFT JOIN talks_follow bt
  ON bt.talk_id = t.talk_id
LEFT JOIN talks_comments b
  ON b.talk_id = t.talk_id
GROUP BY t.talk_id;

Both give me the same results ....?!

Update: Create Statements

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `talks` (
`talk_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`user_id` mediumint(9) NOT NULL,
`title` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
`content` text NOT NULL,
`created_date` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
`privacy` enum('public','private') NOT NULL DEFAULT 'private',
PRIMARY KEY (`talk_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=7 ;

 CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `talks_comments` (
`comment_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`talk_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
`user_id` mediumint(9) NOT NULL,
`comment` text NOT NULL,
`date_created` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
`status` tinyint(1) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
 PRIMARY KEY (`comment_id`)
 ) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=8 ;

 CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `talks_fan` (
`fan_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`talk_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
`user_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
`created_date` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
`status` tinyint(1) NOT NULL DEFAULT '1',
PRIMARY KEY (`fan_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=4 ;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `talks_follow` (
`follow_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`talk_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
`user_id` mediumint(9) NOT NULL,
`date_created` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE       CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
PRIMARY KEY (`follow_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=5 ;

The final query that works

SELECT t.* ,  COUNT( DISTINCT b.comment_id ) AS comments, 
            COUNT( DISTINCT bt.follow_id ) AS followers, 
            COUNT( DISTINCT c.fan_id ) AS fans
FROM talks t

LEFT JOIN talks_follow bt ON bt.talk_id = t.talk_id
LEFT JOIN talks_comments b ON b.talk_id = t.talk_id
LEFT JOIN talks_fan c ON c.talk_id = t.talk_id

WHERE t.privacy = 'public'
GROUP BY t.talk_id
ORDER BY t.created_date DESC 
LIMIT 30

EDIT: Final answer to the whole issue...

I have modified the Query and created some code in PHP (Codeigniter) to solve my issue apone the reccomendation of @Bill Karwin

        $sql="
    SELECT t.*,
                    COUNT( DISTINCT b.comment_id ) AS comments, 
                    COUNT( DISTINCT bt.follow_id ) AS followers, 
                    COUNT( DISTINCT c.fan_id ) AS fans,
                    GROUP_CONCAT( DISTINCT c.user_id ) AS list_of_fans
    FROM talks t

    LEFT JOIN talks_follow bt ON bt.talk_id = t.talk_id
    LEFT JOIN talks_comments b ON b.talk_id = t.talk_id
    LEFT JOIN talks_fan c ON c.talk_id = t.talk_id

    WHERE t.privacy = 'public'
    GROUP BY t.talk_id
    ORDER BY t.created_date DESC 
    LIMIT 30
    ";

    $query = $this->db->query($sql);
    if($query->num_rows() > 0)
    {

        $results = array();

        foreach($query->result_array() AS $talk){
            $fan_user_id = explode(",", $talk['list_of_fans']);
            foreach($fan_user_id AS $user){
                 if($user == 1 /* this supposed to be user id or session*/){
                     $talk['list_of_fans'] = 'yes';
                 }
            }

            $follower_user_id = explode(",", $talk['list_of_follower']);
            foreach($follower_user_id AS $user){
                 if($user == 1 /* this supposed to be user id or session*/){
                     $talk['list_of_follower'] = 'yes';
                 }
            }

             $results[] = array(
                    'talk_id'           => $talk['talk_id'], 
                    'user_id'           => $talk['user_id'],
                    'title'             => $talk['title'], 
                    'created_date'      => $talk['created_date'], 
                    'comments'          => $talk['comments'], 
                    'followers'         => $talk['followers'], 
                    'fans'              => $talk['fans'], 
                    'list_of_fans'      => $talk['list_of_fans'],
                    'list_of_follower'  => $talk['list_of_follower']                        
                    );

        }
    }

I STILL BELIEVE IT COULD BE OPTIMIZED IN THE DB AND JUST USE THE RESULT...

Im thinking if there are 1000 follower and 2000 fans of every single TALK then the result will take much longer to load.. HOW IF YOUT MULTIPLY THE NO WITH 10. Or im mistaking hear...

EDIT: adding benchmark for the query test...

I have used codeigniter profiler to know how long it take for the query to finish excuting.

that been said i also start adding data in the tables gratually

the result as follows.

Testing the DB after answerting data into it

Query Results time

table Talks
---------------
table data 50 rows.
Time: 0.0173 seconds

Table Rows: 644 rows
Time: 0.0535 seconds

Table Rows: 1250 rows
Time: 0.0856 seconds


Adding data to other tables
--------------------------
Talks = 1250 rows
talks_follow = 4115
talks_fan = 10 rows

Time: 2.656 seconds

Adding data to other tables
--------------------------
Talks = 1250 rows
talks_follow = 4115
talks_fan = 10 rows
talks_comments = 3650 rows

Time: 10.156 seconds

After replacing LEFT JOIN with STRAIGHT_JOIN

Time: 6.675 seconds

It seems that its extremely heavy on the DB..... NOW Im Going to another dilemma on how to enhance its performance

Edited: using @leonardo_assumpcao suggestion

After rebuilding the DB using @leonardo_assumpcao suggestion
for indexing few fields..........


Adding data to other tables
--------------------------
Talks       = 6000  Rows
talks_follow    = 10000 Rows
talks_fan   = 10000 Rows
talks_comments  = 10000 Rows

Time: 17.940 second

Is this normal for heavy data DB......?

share|improve this question
    
You need to perform a separate queries for every table, you don't need join for this task - just 4 separate trivial queries –  zerkms Apr 12 '13 at 0:47
    
Thank for the answer. Im using codeigniter and some how its required to be in one query to i could send the results using array with ease. ist possible to be done in one QUERY ? –  Anmar Apr 12 '13 at 0:53
    
I highly recommend to do that in separate queries –  zerkms Apr 12 '13 at 0:55
1  
I only see four tables.... –  Ollie Jones Apr 12 '13 at 1:40
1  
thx @leonardo_assumpcao it improved my results speed by more then 40%... But still its 2 slow, maybe i will start breaking the query into sub-queries or start using catch for the results.. i need to do some homework for that.... –  Anmar Apr 13 '13 at 18:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I can say this is (at least) one of the coolest select statements I improved today.

SELECT STRAIGHT_JOIN
  t.* ,
  COUNT( DISTINCT b.comment_id ) AS comments, 
  COUNT( DISTINCT bt.follow_id ) AS followers, 
  COUNT( DISTINCT c.fan_id )     AS fans

FROM
  (
    SELECT * FROM talks
    WHERE privacy = 'public'
    ORDER BY created_date DESC
    LIMIT 0, 30
  ) AS t

LEFT JOIN talks_follow   bt ON (bt.talk_id = t.talk_id)

LEFT JOIN talks_comments b  ON (b.talk_id = t.talk_id)

LEFT JOIN talks_fan      c  ON (c.talk_id = t.talk_id)

GROUP BY t.talk_id ;

But it seems to me that your problem resides on your tables; A first step to obtain efficient queries is to index every field involved on your desired joins.

I've made some modifications on the tables you shown above; You can see its code here (updated).
Quite interesting, isn't it? Since we're here, take also your ERR model:

Tables

First try it using MySQL test database. Hopefully it will solve your performance troubles.

(Forgive my english, it's my second language)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you @leonardo_assumpcao. using ur DB design and using the indexies for all that much of field i managed to get the results in Query took 0.2187 sec –  Anmar Apr 13 '13 at 20:12
    
Please have a look at the benchmark for your suggested solution... I think your solution is the best so far I mean its what fit me best. the question is now is 17 seconds respond time is okay with that amount of data in the DB....? thx again... –  Anmar Apr 13 '13 at 21:31
    
Oh no! It's no good. Really no good. Far from "good". Let me try to do a magic here (aww I think I know) (I forgot one obvious index)! –  leonardo_assumpcao Apr 14 '13 at 0:50
    
@Anmar We're ordering by t.created_date, isn't it? And where's the created_date index? huh?? We forgot. I'll update once more. –  leonardo_assumpcao Apr 14 '13 at 0:52
    
i have indexied it.. its better but not yet... However i made some changes to the query... But im not sure if its correct... i have limited the result in side the TALKs SELECT statments into 30 and added ORDER BY created_date in it as well and im getting the results in 0.0018 s FROM ( SELECT * FROM talks WHERE privacy = 'public' ORDER BY created_date DESC LIMIT 30 ) AS t ------------- Anything wrong with this method....???? –  Anmar Apr 14 '13 at 15:19

You can force this into one query like so:

SELECT COUNT(*) num, 'talks' item         FROM talks
UNION
SELECT COUNT(*) num, 'talks_fan' item     FROM talks_fan
UNION
SELECT COUNT(*) num, 'talks_follow' item  FROM talks_follow
UNION
SELECT COUNT(*) num, 'talks_comment' item FROM talks_comment

This will give you a five row resultset with one row per table. Each row is the count in a particular table.

If you must get it all into a single row you can do a pivot like so.

SELECT 
  SUM( CASE item WHEN 'talks'         THEN num ELSE 0 END ) AS 'talks', 
  SUM( CASE item WHEN 'talks_fan'     THEN num ELSE 0 END ) AS 'talks_fan', 
  SUM( CASE item WHEN 'talks_follow'  THEN num ELSE 0 END ) AS 'talks_follow', 
  SUM( CASE item WHEN 'talks_comment' THEN num ELSE 0 END ) AS 'talks_comment'
FROM 
(   SELECT COUNT(*) num, 'talks' item         FROM talks
    UNION
    SELECT COUNT(*) num, 'talks_fan' item     FROM talks_fan
    UNION
    SELECT COUNT(*) num, 'talks_follow' item  FROM talks_follow
    UNION
    SELECT COUNT(*) num, 'talks_comment' item FROM talks_comment
) counts

(This doesn't take into account your WHERE g.privacy = clause because I don't understand that. But you could add a WHERE clause to one one of the four queries in the UNION item to handle that.)

Notice that this truly is four queries on four separate tables coerced into a single query.

And, by the way, there is no difference in value between COUNT(*) and COUNT(id) when id is the primary key of the table. COUNT(id) doesn't count the rows for which the id is NULL, but if id is the primary key, then it is NOT NULL. But COUNT(*) is faster, so use it.

Edit if you need the number of fan, follow, and comment rows for each distinct talk, do this. It's the same idea of doing a union and a pivot, but with an extra parameter.

SELECT 
      talk_id, 
      SUM( CASE item WHEN 'talks_fan'     THEN num ELSE 0 END ) AS 'talks_fan', 
      SUM( CASE item WHEN 'talks_follow'  THEN num ELSE 0 END ) AS 'talks_follow', 
      SUM( CASE item WHEN 'talks_comment' THEN num ELSE 0 END ) AS 'talks_comment'
FROM 
(   
          SELECT talk_id, COUNT(*) num, 'talks_fan' item     
            FROM talks_fan
        GROUP BY talk_id
    UNION
         SELECT talk_id, COUNT(*) num, 'talks_follow' item  
           FROM talks_follow
       GROUP BY talk_id
    UNION
         SELECT talk_id, COUNT(*) num, 'talks_comment' item 
           FROM talks_comment
       GROUP BY talk_id
) counts
GROUP BY talk_id

After doing this for (too) many years, I've discovered that the best way to describe a query you need is to say to yourself "I need a result set with one row for each xxx, with columns for yyy, zzz, and qqq."

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Ollie Jones. It does give me the count but i need the count for every single entry in the table TALKS. example: talk_id 1, 3 follower, 6 fans, 2 comments, talk_id 2, 2 followers, 3 fans, 1 comment.... etc.... –  Anmar Apr 12 '13 at 1:43
    
That's what the first clause in the UNION gives you. SELECT COUNT(*) num, 'talks' item FROM talks If that is not the case, then you have not described your problem adequately. Is your problem statement this: I need one row for each distinct talk, which gives the number of fans, follows, and comments? –  Ollie Jones Apr 12 '13 at 1:45
    
My Apologies for not been clear in the description still trying.. –  Anmar Apr 12 '13 at 1:47
    
It gives me error... #1064 - You have an error in your SQL syntax;... near 'GROUP BY talk_id FROM ( SELECT talk_id, COUNT(*) num, 'talks_fan' ite' at line 6........ By the way im using Server version: 5.5.16 –  Anmar Apr 12 '13 at 2:04
    
fixed it, last night actually –  Ollie Jones Apr 12 '13 at 17:10

The reason the counts are the same is that it's counting rows after the joins have combined the tables. By joining to multiple tables, you're creating a Cartesian product.

Basically, you're counting not only how many comments per talk, but how many comments * followers per talk. Then you count the followers as how many followers * comments per talk. Thus the counts are the same, and they're all way too high.

Here's a simpler way to write a query to count each distinct comment, follower, etc. only once:

SELECT t.*, 
  COUNT(DISTINCT b.comment_id) AS comments, 
  COUNT(DISTINCT bt.follow_id) AS followers 
FROM talks t
LEFT JOIN talks_follow bt ON bt.talk_id = t.talk_id
LEFT JOIN talks_comments b ON b.talk_id = t.talk_id
GROUP BY t.talk_id;

Re your comment: I wouldn't fetch all the followers in the same query. You could do it this way:

SELECT t.*, 
  COUNT(DISTINCT b.comment_id) AS comments, 
  COUNT(DISTINCT bt.follow_id) AS followers, 
  GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT bt.follower_name) AS list_of_followers
FROM talks t
LEFT JOIN talks_follow bt ON bt.talk_id = t.talk_id
LEFT JOIN talks_comments b ON b.talk_id = t.talk_id
GROUP BY t.talk_id;

But what you'd get back is a single string with the follower names separated by commas. Now you have to write application code to split the string on commas, you have to worry if some follower names actually contain commas already, and so on.

I'd do a second query, fetching the followers for a given talk. It's likely you want to display the followers only for a specific talk anyway.

SELECT follower_name
FROM talks_follow
WHERE talk_id = ?
share|improve this answer
    
I get my mistake..... your answer works like a charm... thank you.. –  Anmar Apr 12 '13 at 2:13
    
The link you provided about Cartesian product is very useful.. –  Anmar Apr 12 '13 at 2:31
    
How about if i want to pull data with the OUT using count using the SAME query.. is that possible.? Let say i want to pull all the of talks_follow table where user_id = 1 (talks_follow)...? –  Anmar Apr 12 '13 at 16:52
    
It works as you specified.... However would it be possible to select the user_id of a follower based on a condition. example Select all talks, then COUNT followers THEN display the user_id of the follower WHERE user_id = 1......... Im using it in this so i could have the feature of using able to see if he is a follower of the current talk or not.......... Something LIKE FACEBOOK LIKE and DISLIKE.... The goal im trying to achieve is to get all these data in a single and optimized query... Thank to you earlier i have reach must of the requirements... –  Anmar Apr 12 '13 at 17:34
    
Don't try to write your entire application in a single query. It's hard to develop, hard to debug, and probably makes the database work harder than it needs to. A few simple queries is often faster than one huge complex query. –  Bill Karwin Apr 13 '13 at 1:44

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