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This isn't so much of a problem as it is a question. I have several classes that inherit the following abstract class:

public abstract class PixelEditorWindow {
    protected static int windowHeight, windowWidth;

    public PixelEditorWindow() {
        setWindowSize();
    }

    protected abstract void setWindowSize();

    public static int getWindowWidth() {
        return windowWidth;
    }

    public static int getWindowHeight() {
        return windowHeight;
    }
}

I have each class inherit the abstract method setWindowSize, where they set what their window size will be, and these two variables are set, as follows:

protected void setWindowSize() {
    windowWidth = 400;
    windowHeight = 400;
}

That works perfectly. But I also need all of them to keep track of the JFrame they're contained in now, so I modified this class in the following way:

public abstract class PixelEditorWindow {
    protected int windowHeight, windowWidth;
    JFrame frame;

    public PixelEditorWindow(JFrame frame) {
        this.frame = frame;
        setWindowSize();
    }

    public JFrame getFrame() {
        return frame;
    }

    protected abstract void setWindowSize();

    public int getWindowWidth() {
        return windowWidth;
    }

    public int getWindowHeight() {
        return windowHeight;
    }
}

Now, all inherited classes have the same window size, which is whatever type of window was instantiated last. I can fix it by having another class that inherits this one that all the sub-classes inherit, but that's messier than I'd like. EDIT: just realized I can't do that either, but there are lots of other messy ways to work around this. Why is it that adding a non-static instance variable mucks everything up? Or a better question I suppose - why is it that not having a non-static instance variable allows this to work?

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3  
Please show the implementations of setWindowSize so that we can see how they interact with the parent class fields. – Thilo Apr 12 '13 at 0:47
2  
The variables should never have been static in the first place. You're on the right track, just keep going. – EJP Apr 12 '13 at 1:36

"static" means association at the class level.

Non-static means association at object level.

Basically, I would need to remove all static stuff. And later on use "static" when you know why you need it.

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