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This question already has an answer here:

How do I go about generating random integer values between a range (in this case 1-12 including 1 and 12) in the C language?

I've read about seeding (srand()) and using rand() within a range but am unsure about how to go about it.

Edit: Here is what I have so far

# include <stdio.h>
# include <stdlib.h>
# include <time.h>

// Craps Program
// Written by Kane Charles
// Lab 2 - Task 2

// 7 or 11 indicates instant win
// 2, 3 or 12 indicates instant los
// 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10 on first roll becomes "the point"
// keep rolling dice until either 7 or "the point is rolled"
//      if "the point" is rolled the player wins
//      if 7 is rolled then the player loses

int wins = 0, losses = 0;
int r, i;
int N = 1, M = 12;
int randomgenerator();


main(void){

  /* initialize random seed: */
  srand (time(NULL));
  /* generate random number 10,000 times: */
  for(i=0; i < 10000 ; i++){
     int r = randomgenerator();
     if (r = 7 || 11) {
        wins++;
     }
     else if (r = 2 || 3 || 12) {
        losses++;
     }
     else if (r = 4 || 5 || 6 || 8 || 9 || 10) {
        int point = r;
        int temproll;
        do
        {
            int temproll = randomgenerator();

        }while (temproll != 7 || point);

        if (temproll = 7) {
            losses++;
        }
        else if (temproll = point) {
            wins++;
        }
     }
  }
    printf("Wins\n");
    printf("%lf",&wins);
    printf("\nLosses\n");
    printf("%lf",&losses);
}

int randomgenerator(){
    r = M + rand() / (RAND_MAX / (N - M + 1) + 1);
    return r;
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by jogojapan, Raymond Chen, dasblinkenlight, dreamlax, Jonathan Leffler Apr 12 '13 at 2:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
See here as well: stackoverflow.com/questions/5008804/… (C++, but answers cover C as well.) – jogojapan Apr 12 '13 at 2:32
1  
This site might be of interest, to you... – Seb Apr 12 '13 at 2:36
    
You've accepted Chahaun's answer as correct, but note my concern about roundoff error. His algorithm probably does not in fact uniformly sample from the range, i.e., doesn't behave correctly. – Matt Phillips Apr 12 '13 at 2:59
    
@MattPhillips I haven't really thought about it in depth yet, but what you say sounds like a useful consideration. Perhaps you should add some explanation of this to your answer? – jogojapan Apr 12 '13 at 3:10
1  
@jogojapan Ok I added some comments. – Matt Phillips Apr 12 '13 at 3:27
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You should use: M + rand() / (RAND_MAX / (N - M + 1) + 1)

Don't use rand() % N (which tries to return numbers from 0 to N-1) is poor, because the low-order bits of many random number generators are distressingly non-random. (See question 13.18.)

example code:

#include <stdio.h>      /* printf, scanf, puts, NULL */
#include <stdlib.h>     /* srand, rand */
#include <time.h>       /* time */
int main ()
{
  int r, i;
  int N = 1,
      M = 12;
  /* initialize random seed: */
  srand (time(NULL));

  /* generate secret number between 1 and 10: */
  for(i=0; i < 10 ; i++){ 
     r = M + rand() / (RAND_MAX / (N - M + 1) + 1);
     printf("\n%d", r);
  }
  printf("\n") ;
  return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Its working here at codepad

share|improve this answer
1  
This site might also be of interest to you, my friend... – Seb Apr 12 '13 at 2:41
    
@modifiablelvalue Thanks interesting :) Its good site. Have you gone to the site I linked in this answer. – Grijesh Chauhan Apr 12 '13 at 2:45
    
Where the range is large, roundoff error will bias the distribution towards lower values. – Matt Phillips Apr 12 '13 at 2:49
1  
@KaneCharles Not if you care about loaded dice... – Seb Apr 12 '13 at 2:59
1  
The answer is INCORRECT as N and M are mistaken. Please take Matt's concern seriously. – Yang Apr 12 '13 at 3:07

The simple way is

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/time.h>

int main(void)
{
    struct timeval t1;
    gettimeofday(&t1, NULL);
    srand(t1.tv_usec * t1.tv_sec);

    int a = 1, b = 12;

    int val = a + (b-a) * (double)rand() / (double)RAND_MAX + 0.5;

    return 0;
}

Edit, since someone asked: You really do have to use floating point arithmetic to get this to come out right (or as right as it can given rand()'s limitations such as they are). Any solution which relies purely on integer arithmetic and rand() will of necessity use \ or %, and when this happens you will get roundoff error--where c and d are declared int and c = 5 and d = 2, for example, c/d == 2 and d/c == 0. When comes to sampling from a range, what happens is that in compressing the range [0, RAND_MAX] to [a, b], you have to do some kind of division operation since the former is so much larger than the latter. Then roundoff creates bias (unless you get really lucky and things evenly divide). Not a truly thorough explanation but I hope that conveys the idea.

share|improve this answer
1  
Can you please how this works and why it is dirty? – Kane Charles Apr 12 '13 at 2:31
    
@KaneCharles rand() generates a number from 0 to RAND_MAX. Dividing by RAND_MAX then gives you a random value on [0, 1] which can then be scaled according to the range of discrete values you want. As for being dirty, actually I think I was thinking of another way this gets done sometimes with %--this answer is not dirty! Edited accordingly. :) – Matt Phillips Apr 12 '13 at 2:35
1  
It's dirty because it uses C++ in a C question, and because it uses rand, which just isn't all that great. – Seb Apr 12 '13 at 2:39
    
@modifiablelvalue Sorry where's the C++? – Matt Phillips Apr 12 '13 at 2:42
1  
@MattPhillips: #include <cstdlib> doesn't work in a C compiler. It's a C++ header. – dreamlax Apr 12 '13 at 2:44

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