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This is the scenario:

  • I can only use the char* data type for the string, not wchar_t *
  • My MS Visual C++ compiler has to be set to MBCS, not UNICODE because the third party source code that I have is using MBCS; Setting it to UNICODE will cause data type issues.
  • I am trying to print chinese characters on a printer which needs to get a character string so it can print correctly

What should I do with this line to make the code correct: char * str = "你好";

Convert it to hex sequence perhaps? If yes, how? Thanks a lot.

char * str = "你好";
size_t len = strlen(str) + 1;


wchar_t * wstr = new wchar_t[len];
size_t convertedSize  = 0;
mbstowcs_s(&convertedSize, wstr, len, str, _TRUNCATE);
cout << convertedSize;

if(! ExtTextOutW(resource->dc, 1,1 , ETO_OPAQUE, NULL, wstr ,  convertedSize, NULL))
{
  return 0;
}

UPDATE : Let's put the question in another way

I have this, the char * str contain sequence of UTF-8 code units, for the 2 chinese character 你好 , the ExtTextOutW still cannot execute the wstr correctly, because I think the my code for mbstowcs_s could still not working correctly. Any idea why ?

char * str = "\xE4\xBD\xA0\xE5\xA5\xBD";    
    size_t len = strlen(str) + 1;
    wchar_t * wstr = new wchar_t[len];
    size_t convertedSize  = 0;
    mbstowcs_s(&convertedSize, wstr, len, str, _TRUNCATE);
    if(! ExtTextOutW(resource->dc, 1,1 , ETO_OPAQUE, NULL,  wstr ,  len, NULL))
    {
        return 0;
    }
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marked as duplicate by Will Apr 12 '13 at 13:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Add "L" to "你好", char * str = L"你好"; and set project to non-UTF8 –  MYMNeo Apr 12 '13 at 3:32
    
Hi, may I know how to set the project to non-utf8 , btw having the L will need my datatype to be wchar_t * str –  William Apr 12 '13 at 3:48
    
right click to your project tab, find a option called like "charset" set it to non-set(not utf8 nor multibytes).Then `char * str = "你好"; printf("%s",str); will show "你好" on your console. –  MYMNeo Apr 12 '13 at 4:03
    
@MYMNeo I don't know what you're talking about, there is no UTF-8 in Windows. By "Unicode", they mean UTF-16. And he says he can't use that. –  Cody Gray Apr 12 '13 at 6:23
    
@CodyGray, sorry, I misspell it, it is Unicode.Right click to your project, select property option.Then find a setting called like "charset", set it nether "Unicode" or "Multibytes".Then you can assign variable like this char * str = "你好"; and print it out to console. –  MYMNeo Apr 12 '13 at 6:30

2 Answers 2

The fact is, 你好 is a sequence of Unicode characters. You will need to use a Unicode character set in order to ensure that it will be displayed correctly.

The only possible exception to that is if you're using a multi-byte character set that includes both of these characters in the basic character set. Since you say that you're stuck compiling for the MBCS anyway, that might be a solution. In order to make it work, you will have to set the system language to one that includes this character. The exact way you do this changes in each OS version. I think they're trying to "improve" it. On Windows 7, at least, they call this the "Language for non-Unicode programs" setting, accessible in the "Regions and Language" control panel.

If there is no system language in which these characters are provided as part of the basic character set, then you are basically out of luck.

Even if you tried to use a UTF-8 encoding (which Windows does not natively support, instead preferring UTF-16 for its Unicode support), which uses the char data type, it is very likely that whatever other application/library you're interfacing with would not be able to deal with it. Windows applications assume that a char holds a character in the current ANSI/MB character set. Unicode characters are in a wchar_t, and since you can't use that, it indicates the application simply doesn't support Unicode. (That means it's broken, by the way—time to upgrade.)

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, I have changed my OS locale to Chinese, then it works, but only on the console application that I built. But does not work on the PHP extension that I made, what's printed out boxes only. The problem is I can't upgrade, the PHP C code only support MBCS for compiling. –  William Apr 12 '13 at 7:36
    
Hi, I have update my question, maybe you can take a look if there's solution ? Thanks –  William Apr 12 '13 at 7:45

As an adaptation from what MYMNeo said, I would suggest that this would work:

wchar_t *str = L"你好";
fputws(str, stdout);

ps. This probably isn't C: cout << convertedSize;.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that, the problem is I cannot use wchar_t * datatype, I am modifying a PHP C source code, which the zend engine only receive the argument passed to it as char * not wchar_t –  William Apr 12 '13 at 4:24

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