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Thats the Store Credit problem on Google code jam. https://code.google.com/codejam/contest/351101/dashboard#s=p0

My code gives out a SIGSEGV after running the large test. But the answer is correct!

#include <cstdio>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;
int ps[1000]={0};
vector<int> indice[1000];
int main() {
  int cases; scanf("%d", &cases);
  for(int j=1;j<=cases;j++) {
    printf("Case #%d: ", j);
    int c, is; scanf("%d%d", &c, &is);
    for(int i=0;i<=c;i++) ps[i]=0;
    for(int i=0;i<=c;i++) indice[i].clear();
    for (int i = 0; i < is; i++) {
      int it; scanf("%d", &it);
      indice[it].push_back(i+1);
      ps[it]=1;
      if (c-it>0&&ps[c-it]) {
        int a, b;
        a = indice[it][0];
        b = indice[c-it][0];
        if(c==2*it&&indice[it].size()>1) {
          b=indice[it][1];
        }

        if (a!=b) {
          printf("%d %d\n", min(a,b),max(a,b));
        }
      }
    }
  }
  return 0;
}

So I use valgrind to find out what's going on .. but it seems that it's not my problem.

==17599== Invalid free() / delete / delete[] / realloc()
==17599==    at 0x4C2A4BC: operator delete(void*) (in /usr/lib/valgrind/vgpreload_memcheck-amd64-linux.so)
==17599==    by 0x401669: __gnu_cxx::new_allocator<int>::deallocate(int*, unsigned long) (new_allocator.h:98)
==17599==    by 0x4013CD: std::_Vector_base<int, std::allocator<int> >::_M_deallocate(int*, unsigned long) (stl_vector.h:156)
==17599==    by 0x400F60: std::_Vector_base<int, std::allocator<int> >::~_Vector_base() (stl_vector.h:142)
==17599==    by 0x400D8D: std::vector<int, std::allocator<int> >::~vector() (stl_vector.h:351)
==17599==    by 0x400C48: __tcf_0 (a.cpp:6)
==17599==    by 0x5383900: __run_exit_handlers (exit.c:78)
==17599==    by 0x5383984: exit (exit.c:100)
==17599==    by 0x5369773: (below main) (libc-start.c:258)
==17599==  Address 0x1 is not stack'd, malloc'd or (recently) free'd
==17599== 
==17599== 
==17599== HEAP SUMMARY:
==17599==     in use at exit: 128 bytes in 1 blocks
==17599==   total heap usage: 4,527 allocs, 4,527 frees, 113,664 bytes allocated
==17599== 
==17599== LEAK SUMMARY:
==17599==    definitely lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==17599==    indirectly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==17599==      possibly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==17599==    still reachable: 128 bytes in 1 blocks
==17599==         suppressed: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==17599== Rerun with --leak-check=full to see details of leaked memory
==17599== 
==17599== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==17599== ERROR SUMMARY: 1 errors from 1 contexts (suppressed: 2 from 2)

I'm so confused... Could anybody tell me what's going on? I'm a newbie of C++ .. Thank you very much.

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can you use vector of vector insted of 1000 hard coded vector. vector<vector<int>>; –  shivakumar Apr 12 '13 at 3:02
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As I understand valgrind, it can't detect that you are writing outside of the bounds of arrays that are staticly allocated. So let's allocate them on the heap.

vector<int> *indice = new vector<int>[1000];
int *ps = new int[1000];

Then, you will see errors come out of valgrind. Including:

==7168== Invalid read of size 8
==7168==    at 0x4008D6: main (stl_vector.h:735)
==7168==  Address 0x4c39e10 is 8 bytes after a block of size 24,008 alloc'd
==7168==    at 0x4A07152: operator new[](unsigned long) (vg_replace_malloc.c:363)
==7168==    by 0x400791: global constructors keyed to indice (foo.cc:6)
==7168==    by 0x400C35: ??? (in /tmp/foo)
==7168==    by 0x4005F2: ??? (in /tmp/foo)
==7168== 
==7168== Invalid read of size 8
==7168==    at 0x4008DA: main (stl_vector.h:735)
==7168==  Address 0x4c39e18 is 16 bytes after a block of size 24,008 alloc'd
==7168==    at 0x4A07152: operator new[](unsigned long) (vg_replace_malloc.c:363)
==7168==    by 0x400791: global constructors keyed to indice (foo.cc:6)
==7168==    by 0x400C35: ??? (in /tmp/foo)
==7168==    by 0x4005F2: ??? (in /tmp/foo)
==7168== 

And using gdb, I can see that the SIGSEGV occurs when you access indice[1433], which is outside of the bounds of indice.

I also imagine that your actual issue is that for the large dataset, the variables bounds are listed as:

N = 50
3 ≤ I ≤ 2000

Are you sure you shouldn't be allocating 2001 elements, instead of 1000?

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Oh yes! Thank you very much! I was too careless. –  Kan Liu Apr 12 '13 at 3:43
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