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Is there a way to exclude a particular type of .cs file when doing a search in Visual Studio 2005/8?

Example: In a refactoring scenario i might search to identify string literals in my code so that i can refactor them into constants or some such. However, *designer.cs files are full of string literals which i don't care to deal with but they show up in my search and pollute the result set.

i usually search for *.cs...

How do i ignore *.designer.cs?

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Any chance you could post your solution as a answer. The accepted answer is now linking to a 404 –  Blowsie Jan 3 '13 at 16:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I see it's pretty late, but looking at the number of votes and activity on this page, I'm posting my answer; maybe someone else finds it useful. Here's how you can do this in VS2010 and above:

  1. Open Package Manager Console (Tools > NuGet Package Manager > Package Manager Console). Let PowerShell initialize itself.
  2. Enter the following command at PowerShell Prompt:

    dir -Recurse | Select-String -pattern "Your Search Word Or Pattern" -exclude "*.designer.cs"

  3. This will list all the occurrences of the word or pattern you've specified, including file name, line number and the text line where it was found.

Additional Notes

  1. If you want to specify multiple exclude patterns, replace "*.designer.cs" with @("*.designer.cs", "*.designer.vb", "reference.cs") or whatever other files you want to skip.
  2. Another good thing about it is that the search patter supports regular expressions as well.
  3. One downside of this solution is that it doesn't let you double-click a line in the result to open that file in Visual Studio. You can workaround this limitation through command-piping:

    dir -Recurse | Select-String -pattern "Your String Or Pattern" -exclude "*.designer.vb" | sort | Select -ExpandProperty "Path" | get-unique | ForEach-Object { $DTE.ExecuteCommand(“File.OpenFile”, $_) }

This will open all the files where the string or pattern was found in Visual Studio. You can then use Find window in individual files to locate the exact instances.

Another advantage of this solution is that it works in Express versions as well, since Package Manager is included in 2012 and 2013 Express versions; not sure about 2010 though.

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Hi, just copy and paste the above to "Look at these file types:"

-Steven Chong

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3  
Although this works in that *.designer.cs doesn't display in the search results, white-listing is not the same as blacklisting the criteria. For instance, If I wanted to ignore *.designer.cs and Reference.cs, this white-list fails. –  Jim Schubert Jun 7 '12 at 16:10
    
it's a workaround, Visual Studio will save your list. i can post another white-list if you want to ignore both *.designer.cs and reference.cs, which I personally found useful and want to share –  Steven Chong Jun 8 '12 at 8:37
2  
it's so ugly that I like it :-D –  slawekwin Mar 8 '13 at 10:25
2  
This is bad and you should feel bad! Though VS should feel worse for forcing us to do this, nice work :) –  Chao Jul 3 '13 at 10:16
1  
This made me snort :) –  demoncodemonkey Jun 10 '14 at 9:50

For Visual Studio 2010 try the Ultra Find extension. You can explicitly exclude extensions.

Using Ultra Find to search files with cs extension but excluding designer.cs and generated.cs files.

Note that the search speed depends on if you are searching the file system or the project/solution.

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3  
Unfortunately there is no Regex search in Ultra Find, it reduces some of the Ultraness... –  Helo Dec 7 '12 at 11:12
2  
It's a shame the Ultra Find extension was removed.. Anyone know of anything else? –  wasatchwizard May 28 '13 at 18:44
    
@wasatchwizard I'm also looking for something similar. You have any luck finding something (specifically VS2012)? –  Adam Plocher Jun 4 '13 at 22:36

The Microsoft Connect ticket "Find option to exclude designer generated code" indicates that filtering search by file extension won't be present in VS 2010.

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1  
This answer is now invalid, as filtering by file type is possible in VS2010 –  George W Bush Jun 20 '11 at 0:51
    
@hamlin11 Can you provide a reference for this? –  TK. Oct 21 '11 at 8:22
    
Sure, I made a screen shot. Use "Find in files" i.imgur.com/UzI3l.png –  George W Bush Oct 21 '11 at 15:08
4  
Not sure how this helps - you an search by file type, but how do you exclude certain file names? –  Travis Aug 23 '12 at 3:53
    
Link 404. I guess we have Microsoft to thank for that. –  Blowsie Jan 3 '13 at 15:59

I just came across this question in my search for an answer to this very problem.

Got frustrated with VS and fell back on my trusty copy of UltraEdit and specified these options in its "Find in Files" tool:

File names/extensions to ignore in search:

    *.pdb;*.dll;*.exe;*designer.vb;*.xsd;*.xml;*.xss;*.resx;
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@sammeric: Thanks for the tip, and welcome to SO. Is there a free version of UltraEdit? I like Notepad++ but it does not seem to have the search ignore feature. (Btw, signatures aren't necessary in SO responses. All of your posts are auto-signed with your name & avatar.) –  Paul Sasik Apr 6 '11 at 16:26
    
Unfortunately there is no free version of UltraEdit. I paid for a copy because I've used it for years (originally for its column-edit mode before VS added that feature). It has a ton of powerful features which make it personally worth the outlay. I use the scripting of regex search and replace just to name one feature. –  samneric Apr 7 '11 at 20:07

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