Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Checkinging many XML strings, I use the ErrorCollector construction frequently. But still I do not understand how it works.

When I am declaring an ErrorCollector, I have to assign it at once:

@Rule
public ErrorCollector collector= new ErrorCollector();

If I want to refresh the collector before every test, I am putting an assignment

collector= new ErrorCollector();

in the @Before method. But thus the first assignment at the declaration is excessive. But I can't remove it.

What is the sense of this must-to-be-assignment? And how it works? I thought, that @Rule is about the declaration only?

@Matthew Farwell at What is the logic of @Rule(JUnit) declaration and assignment in a Groovy class says "In Java, the JUnit runner checks that the @Rule annotation is applied to a public non-static field or public non-static method which returns either a TestRule or MethodRule." But what is checked here is not the declaration, but the assignment and it is something that happens afterwards, after both building and test construction ?

share|improve this question
    
What is test-construction and why does it apply to this question, while unit-testing does not? – Charles Apr 16 '13 at 16:20
up vote 2 down vote accepted

As with most / all @Rules in JUnit, they are refreshed or cleared before each test automatically. So you just declare it as a @Rule as you have listed above. You DO NOT need to do anything to it in your @Before method. We way to think of it is that JUnit will invoke the ErrorCollector before and after each test. Before each test the ErrorCollector can initialize itself (clearing any previously stored errors). After each test, if an error has been collected it reports the error(s).

Here is the source for ErrorCollector

From Comment:

It must be assigned because JUnit must have an instance of the rule to work with. Otherwise the object would be null. Remember that the JUnit code is using reflection to get the instance of the Object with the @Rule annotation and using instanceof to determine if it is a TestRule or MethodRule. I believe the @Before method is called within the Statement and therefore after the Rule is invoked

FROM MatthewFarwell:

When you run a JUnit test, for example, FooTest, then the runner will create an instance of FooTest for each test method. So if you're using public ErrorCollector collector= new ErrorCollector(); as above, then this gets naturally re-instantiated once per test method.

Conclusing: Make sure that you don't save state between your tests! Of course you shouldn't have done that anyway since order is not guaranteed.

Thanks Matt!

share|improve this answer
    
"Before each test the ErrorCollector can initialize itself" 1. So, can or shall? 2. Thank you, and have a +1, but I would like to understand the behaviour of that @Rule annotation. – Gangnus Apr 12 '13 at 10:59
    
1. You shouldn't care. The point is that you don't have to do anything other than declare it as a @Rule. 2. The @Rule annotation is used by JUnit to identify TestRule instances that should be used to wrap each test method. JUnit wraps the execution of each test in a Statement and then provides the Statement to each found Rule in order for the Rule to wrap the statement with its own custom logic. – John B Apr 12 '13 at 12:04
    
It seems, that I have understood, thank you. But that doesn't explain why have I to use assignment in the declaration statement. I can read source code, it is not a problem. But WHAT source code have I to read - that is the question. – Gangnus Apr 12 '13 at 12:29
    
It must be assigned because JUnit must have an instance of the rule to work with. Otherwise the object would be null. Remember that the JUnit code is using reflection to get the instance of the Object with the @Rule annotation and using instanceof to determine if it is a TestRule or MethodRule. I believe the @Before method is called within the Statement and therefore after the Rule is invoked. – John B Apr 12 '13 at 12:44
2  
@JohnB When you run a JUnit test, for example, FooTest, then the runner will create an instance of FooTest for each test method. So if you're using public ErrorCollector collector= new ErrorCollector(); as above, then this gets naturally re-instantiated once per test method. – Matthew Farwell Apr 12 '13 at 16:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.