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I had to ask this question again because the first question I post wasn't specific enough to get an answer.

Ok so I've been learning about web development and I'm currently a junior with this company, and my task is to fix bugs within a website that is still in production. There's one bug I just can't get my head round. I've searched all over, tried tinkering with things and still no luck. I know there's been a similar question on here but it didn't help me.

What's happening is, when a customer selects an option from a drop-down (How many children do you have? 1, 2, 3, etc.) it produces more fields to pop up on the same page below the drop down. The amount of fields it produces depends on the number selected. Basically the aim of this is to produce fields so the customer can enter the details of each child they have.

The problem: If a customer accidentally clicks the wrong amount of children it produces an accurate amount of fields, but then the customer can't go back and change what they first put on the drop-down. The drop-down seems to disable itself after one use.

Here's the two blocks of code I think creates this (I might be wrong) apologies for the amount of code there is:

                    <fieldset class="l" style="width:900px;">
                        <label for="children">Which of these statements apply to you?</label>
                        <input type="radio" name="children" value="1" class="r" id="have-children"<?php if($fetch['have_children'] > 0) echo " checked"; ?> /> <span>I have children under the age of 18</span>
                        <input type="radio" name="children" value="0" class="r" id="no-children"<?php if(isset($fetch['have_children']) && $fetch['have_children'] == 0) echo " checked"; ?> /> <span>I do not have children/under the age of 18</span>
                    </fieldset>
                    <div style="clear:both;"></div>
                    <fieldset class="l" style="margin:20px 0 0 15px; display:none;<?php if($fetch['have_children'] > 0) echo " display:block"; ?>" id="number-children">
                        <label for="marital-status">How many children do you have?</label>
                        <select name="children" id="children" class="s">
                            <option value="0" disabled selected>Please select...</option>
                            <option value="1"<?php if($fetch['have_children'] == 1) echo " selected"; ?>>1 child</option>
                            <option value="2"<?php if($fetch['have_children'] == 2) echo " selected"; ?>>2 children</option>
                            <option value="3"<?php if($fetch['have_children'] == 3) echo " selected"; ?>>3 children</option>
                            <option value="4"<?php if($fetch['have_children'] == 4) echo " selected"; ?>>4 children</option>
                            <option value="5"<?php if($fetch['have_children'] == 5) echo " selected"; ?>>5 children</option>
                            <option value="6"<?php if($fetch['have_children'] == 6) echo " selected"; ?>>6 children</option>
                            <option value="7"<?php if($fetch['have_children'] == 7) echo " selected"; ?>>7 children</option>
                            <option value="8"<?php if($fetch['have_children'] == 8) echo " selected"; ?>>8 children</option>
                            <option value="9"<?php if($fetch['have_children'] == 9) echo " selected"; ?>>9 children</option>
                            <option value="10"<?php if($fetch['have_children'] == 10) echo " selected"; ?>>10 children</option>
                        </select>
                    </fieldset>

Here's my js

Like I said I'm new to this please try and be patient with me :)

    $.fn.duplicate = function(parent, count, cloneEvents) {
for (var i = 0; i < count; i++) {
    parent.append(this.clone(cloneEvents))
}
$('h4.abt', parent).each(function(index) {
    $(this).html('About child ' + (index + 1));
});
}

$(function() {
$('#have-children').click(function() {
    $('#number-children').slideDown('slow');
    $('#next-step').css('display', 'none');
});

$('#example-will').click(function() {
    $('#popup').css('display', 'block');
    $('#overlay').css('display', 'block');
});

$('.close-btn').click(function() {
    $('#popup').css('display', 'none');
    $('#overlay').css('display', 'none');
});


$('#no-children').click(function() {
    $('#next-step').css('display', 'block');
    $('.child-container').css('display', 'none');
    $('#number-children').slideUp('slow');
    //$('#have-children').attr('disabled', 'disabled');
});

$('#children').change(function() {
    var getid = $(this).attr('value');
    $(this).attr('disabled', 'disabled');
    $('#next-step').css('display', 'block');
    $('.child-container').css('display', 'block');

    $('.child-container').duplicate($('#childrens'), getid-1);
});

$('#estate-value').change(function() {
    $("#next-step").css('display', 'block');
});

$('#no-item').click(function() {
    $('#next-step').css('display', 'block');
    $('#reciptype').css('display', 'none');

});

$('#yes-item').click(function() {
    $('#next-step').css('display', 'none');
    $('#reciptype').css('display', 'block');
});

$('#yes-item').click(function() {
    $('#next-step').css('display', 'none');
    $('#reciptype').css('display', 'block');
});

$('#specific-r').click(function() {
    $('#specific-recipient').css('display', 'block');
    $('#new-person').css('display', 'none');
    $('#charity-recipient').css('display', 'none');


});

$('#newperson-r').click(function() {
    $('#specific-recipient').css('display', 'none');
    $('#new-person').css('display', 'block');
    $('#charity-recipient').css('display', 'none');

});

$('#charity-r').click(function() {
    $('#specific-recipient').css('display', 'none');
    $('#new-person').css('display', 'none');
    $('#charity-recipient').css('display', 'block');
});

$('#choose-beneficaries input').click(function() {
    $('#next-step').css('display', 'block');
});

$('#ben-alreadynamed').click(function() {
    $('#specific-recipient').css('display', 'block');
    $('#new-person').css('display', 'none');
});

$('#ben-newperson').click(function() {
    $('#specific-recipient').css('display', 'none');
    $('#next-step').css('display', 'none');
    $('#new-person').css('display', 'block');
});

$('#beneficiary-details select#recipients').change(function() {
    $('#next-step').css('display', 'block');
});

    $('#beneficiary-details select#recipients').change(function() {
    $('#next-step').css('display', 'block');
});

$('#anbe').click(function() {
    $('#selectrec').css('display', 'block');
});

$('#anbe').click(function() {
    $('#selectrec').css('display', 'block');
    $('#new-person').css('display', 'none');
});

$('#npbe').click(function() {
    $('#new-person').css('display', 'block');
    $('#selectrec').css('display', 'none');
});



});

I understand that there is a hell of a lot of code to go through here, but I would really appreciate some help in fixing this!

Thanks for reading.

share|improve this question
    
i think there is a reason for disabling the select box.. i bet if u dont disable it and and select 5 and change that to eg 4 ull have 9 fields. –  Vloxxity Apr 12 '13 at 9:18
    
I'ts sorted out, so the code I post is the fix for the question, for anyone else who comes across this problem: $('#children').change(function() { var getid = $(this).attr('value'); //$(this).attr('disabled', 'disabled'); $('#next-step').css('display', 'block'); $('.child-container').css('display', 'block'); var children = $('#childrens').find('.child-container'); for(var i = 1; i < children.length; i++){ children.eq(i).remove(); } $('.child-container').duplicate($('#childrens'), getid-1); –  Jack Conlon Apr 12 '13 at 12:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ok, so the code that's disabling your select box is right here in your javascript:

$('#children').change(function() {
    var getid = $(this).attr('value');
    $(this).attr('disabled', 'disabled'); //<-- right here
    $('#next-step').css('display', 'block');
    $('.child-container').css('display', 'block');

    $('.child-container').duplicate($('#childrens'), getid-1);
});

This code is an "on change" event. That is once the value of the select box is modified, this function runs. In this function, the element disables itself (the line i pointed to above).

Now, it's up to you (or your seniors) to decide what behaviour you want. For example: you can remove that line so it never disables.

You could also add an "edit" button or something to re-enable it. To re-enable it, just remove the disabled attribute of that element. For example:

$('#children').removeAttr("disabled");

To fix the new bug you mentioned in the comments, try this:

$('#children').change(function() {
    var getid = $(this).attr('value');
    $('#next-step').css('display', 'block');
    $('.child-container').css('display', 'block');

    //empty out your #childrens container
    $('#childrens').html("");

    //This is the line that creates your fields.
    $('.child-container').duplicate($('#childrens'), getid-1);
});

Ok, so by doing $('#childrens').html(""); I erase the contents, so that you can re-create the child fields from scratch (with the right amount of fields).

share|improve this answer
1  
Aha thanks, so I commented out this line, to come across a new problem. Like you said it was disabling it. But now if I 'accidentally' click 5 children and then want to change back to 4, I can do that, except it will add the fields on the end. So 4+5 creates nine fields. –  Jack Conlon Apr 12 '13 at 9:16
    
Easy fix! Updating my answer now, give me a second. –  Jace Apr 12 '13 at 9:17
    
This extra line you've suggested has now prevented it from bringing up any new fields in the first place, and it still adds on to the previous aswell (as I can see the outline of the where the fields should be, 4+5 makes 9 again). –  Jack Conlon Apr 12 '13 at 9:29
    
@JackConlon I just saw your comment on Maroua's answer. You have a typo: you have $('.child-container').html("");, my answer does not say that, I changed it a while ago. it says $('#childrens').html(""); –  Jace Apr 12 '13 at 9:38
    
Yep I guess I should have refreshed the page, but now this doesn't bring up the new fields, and doesn't even bring up the outline for where they go either. I'm guessing its stopped the 4+5=9 problem, but there's no way to be sure of that. If you do have any more solutions they'd be greatly appreciated, this is helping me learn :) –  Jack Conlon Apr 12 '13 at 9:49

try removing $(this).attr('disabled', 'disabled'); from :

$('#children').change(function() {
    var getid = $(this).attr('value');
    $(this).attr('disabled', 'disabled');
    $('#next-step').css('display', 'block');
    $('.child-container').css('display', 'block');

    $('.child-container').duplicate($('#childrens'), getid-1);
});
share|improve this answer
    
so I commented out this line, to come across a new problem. Like you said it was disabling it. But now if I 'accidentally' click 5 children and then want to change back to 4, I can do that, except it will add the fields on the end. So 4+5 creates nine fields. –  Jack Conlon Apr 12 '13 at 9:30
    
also adding $('.child-container').html(""); before $('.child-container').duplicate($('#childrens'), getid-1); prevented it from bringing up any new fields in the first place, and it still adds on to the previous aswell (as I can see the outline of the where the fields should be, 4+5 makes 9 again) –  Jack Conlon Apr 12 '13 at 9:31

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