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This question already has an answer here:

What I need to do is inserting records into table TAB_B which come as a result from select to table TAB_A (tables are identical in structure), like that:

INSERT /*+ APPEND */ INTO TAB_B SELECT * FROM TAB_A WHERE [CONDITION]

The thing is that i need to know how many records were inserted, so the easiest way is to count them after inserting:

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM TAB_A WHERE [CONDITION]

Anyway, it would be great if I could omit executing query with the same condition twice, so I could do:

BEGIN
  INSERT /*+ APPEND */ INTO TAB_B SELECT * FROM TAB_A WHERE [CONDITION];
  DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE(SQL%ROWCOUNT);
END;

The question is: "Does plsql solution have any cons - especially in terms of PERFORMANCE? Should I stick to INSERT followed by COUNT, or not?"

EDIT Gentleman, I think my question can't be asked more clearly and it is about PERFORMANCE DIFFERENCES plus eventual drawbacks, not the method itself (I tried to state it better in title and question itself). The question you marked as a duplicate is about how to count rows whether my question is which of those two methods is better in terms of performance and if there are any drawbacks while using any of mentioned methods.

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marked as duplicate by shellter, A.B.Cade, Jonathan Leffler, Trott, Vishal Apr 14 '13 at 3:12

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
there is no disadvantage in running the insert in a pl/sql block vs outside a block. – user1788325 Apr 12 '13 at 9:36
    
Not sure about the context, but if you are calling this from code, you would usually be doing something like command.ExecuteNonQuery(), which usually has an int as return type telling you the amount of rows affected. Not sure if that would help, as you didn't mention any context other than the database itself. – René Wolferink Apr 12 '13 at 9:37

Assuming that you're doing this in PL/SQL (as indicated by the tag), the easiest way to accomplish what you want would be to use SQL%ROWCOUNT, as in:

INSERT /*+ APPEND */ INTO TAB_B SELECT * FROM TAB_A WHERE [CONDITION];

nRows_inserted := SQL%ROWCOUNT;

To know how many rows were actually inserted using COUNT(*) query you'd have to execute it once before making the inserts and again after to account for the possibility that there might be rows in the table which already satisfy the condition before you perform the insert.

Share and enjoy.

share|improve this answer
    
Please read again my question, it's about the difference in performance in presented methods. Also, I can count the number of inserted rows querying source table. – WojtusJ Apr 12 '13 at 11:39
    
Why the downvote? this is exactly what is answerd - if you're inside plsql the SQL%ROWCOUNT is better since it doesn't run a query twice – A.B.Cade Apr 12 '13 at 11:46
    
It says you cannot find the number of inserted rows with only one select, since there may be rows satisfying the condition before your insert. Even if you execute another select before the insert, there may be insertions or deletions to the table. So yes, you should stick to SQL%ROWCOUNT – lunr Apr 12 '13 at 15:57

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