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I am using a Version field to control concurrency in a ASP.NET MVC 4 application.

Mapping:

      <class name="User" table="Users">
        <id name="Id">
          <generator class="native"/>
        </id>
        <version name="Version" column="Version"/>
... other fields omitted for brevity...

Entity:

    public class User
    {
            public virtual int Id { get; set; }
            public virtual int Version { get; set; }
... other fields omitted for brevity...

I am using the following approach:

  • read entity by Id and map to my UserDto entity (Dto is for data transfer object pattern), including also the Version field
  • show the form for editing the UserDto entity
  • receive POSTed UserDto entity

Then I do the following:

        // read the original entity from the database using my repository wrapper around NHibernate
        var rep = RepositoryFactory.Create<User>(currentUnitOfWork);
        User originalEntity = rep.GetById(userDto.Id);

        // optimistic lock control - keep the version as the user saw it
        originalEntity.Version = userDto.Version;
... other fields omitted for brevity...

        rep.Update(originalEntity);

The problem is that even if the userDto.Version does not match the originalEntity.Version, NHibernate ignores my userDto.Version and uses the originalEntity.Version (obviously, from the first level cache, because the entity was just read). Such behavior makes my Version field completely useless.

How do I force NHibernate to use my provided Version value and not the cached one?

Also, it would be great to somehow make the version control more transparent for other programmers which are using my Repository, but currently I have no ideas how to make it automatically pick up the version from the received entity and forcing NHibernate to use it without programmer even noticing it.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure you have your mapping file configured correctly? it should generate an update statement like UPDATE People SET ... WHERE PersonID = @p0 AND Version = @p1 where @p1 = the version as read by the user originally. see Ayendes post on NHibernate Concurrency – Trevor Pilley Apr 12 '13 at 11:22
    
Yes, it does generate that, but the value of Version is the one it just read from the database and not the one I set manually in originalEntity.Version = userDto.Version. It seems, NHibernate just ignores my manual update of the Version field. If I break on the Update line and change the Version in database, then I get ObjectStaleStateException, as expected. – JustAMartin Apr 12 '13 at 12:32

What you need to realise is that optimistic concurrency in the example below is only working within the bounds of the ISession created as part of this web request. Therefore if User has a Version value of 5 at the being of this request then it is that which will be used to ensure the User row hasn't been updated.

    // read the original entity from the database using my repository wrapper around NHibernate
    var rep = RepositoryFactory.Create<User>(currentUnitOfWork);
    User originalEntity = rep.GetById(userDto.Id);

    // optimistic lock control - keep the version as the user saw it
    originalEntity.Version = userDto.Version;
    ... other fields omitted for brevity...

    rep.Update(originalEntity);

Therefore to get the required behaviour you would need to do

User originalEntity = rep.GetById(userDto.Id);
if (originalEntity.Version != userDto.Version) throw new ConcurrencyException();

As detailed in the documentation I would expect you would rather be calling something loosely aligned to the following

var @object = userDto.ToUser();
myisession.SaveOrUpdate(@object);
share|improve this answer
    
I hoped to rely on NHib doing this for me. After all, NHibernate throws an ObjectStaleStateException, if I modify the entity in the database while debug-breaking on the rep.Update line, so I should just somehow tell NHib to use my passed Version... That's weird if NHib devs forgot about the possibility that the Version might come from a detached object. – JustAMartin Apr 12 '13 at 12:30
    
Oh, thanks for the documentation link, now I understand better what the "11.4.4. Application version checking" chapter is about. That's a shame that NHib is not able to use my own version value, even if I set it explicitly. I guess, it could be a new feature request... – JustAMartin Apr 12 '13 at 12:43
    
@Martin Did you ever find a better solution? This is a serious shortcoming in NHibernate. I'm still not convinced I'm going to have to do this manually? surely this is a common scenario? – Paul T Davies Nov 15 '13 at 11:16

I know this is an old question, but I'll leave my usual approach here.

This is a know "problem" when using ORMs. Both NHibernate and Entity Framework suffer this "problem"", and it happens because the ORM is tracking internally the version value, not using the one returned by the property. Unlike EF, where you can copy the byte[] values using Array.Copy, in NHibernate I usually evict the entity from the session and then make the update, which indicates to NHibernate that you are updating an existing entity but he will start tracking using the Version you just assigned.

Here's a code snippet:

public void Edit(int id, string description, DateTime version)
{
    using (var session = sessionFactory.OpenSession())
    using (var tx = session.BeginTransaction())
    {
        var record = session.Get<Record>(id);
        record.Version = version;
        record.Description = description;

        session.Evict(record);  //  evict the object from the session
        session.Update(record); //  NHibernate will attach the object, and will use your version

        tx.Commit();
    }
}

If you use interfaces like I usually do in my model classes (example), you can easily create some extension method, making it harder for people to forget.

To my knowledge, I haven't found any issues with this approach, but let me know if you detect any.

share|improve this answer

You can have a look @ this

However, as interceptors are old concept, you can extend DefaultUpdateEventListener in a custom event listener and override OnSaveOrUpdate method like below

var source = @event.Session;
var entity = @event.Entity;
var persister = @event.Session.GetEntityPersister(@event.EntityName, entity);
if (persister.IsVersioned)
{
    var mode = source.GetSessionImplementation().EntityMode;
    var id = persister.GetIdentifier(entity, mode);

    var version = persister.GetVersion(entity, mode);
    var currentVersion = persister.GetCurrentVersion(id, source);

    if (!version.Equals(currentVersion))
    {
        throw new StaleObjectStateException(persister.EntityName, id);
    }
}

The only headache here is GetCurrntVersion sends a DB call. So, not a very suitable solution for cloud applications, as every call is billed.

Alternatively, you can Evict the object from session. But, you will be loosing the 1st level caching advantage.

If I find any better solution, will post.

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