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I'm working on a system where I'd like to have my layers decoupled as much as possible, you know, some kind of modular application to be able to switch databases and stuff without a serious modification of the rest of the system.

So, I've been watching for x-the time one of the talks of Robert C. Martin about good practices, clean code, decoupling architecture etc, to get some inspiration. What I find kinda weird is his description of the system Fitnesse and the way they've implemented store/load methods for WikiPages. I'm linking the video as well: Robert C. Martin - Clean Architecture and Design

What's he describing (at least from my understanding) is that the entity is aware of the mechanism how to store and load itself from some persistent layer. When he wanted to store WikiPages in-memory, he simply overrode the WikiPage and created a new InMemoryWikiPage. When he wanted to store them in a database, he did the same thing...

So, one of my questions is - what is this approach called? I've been learning the whole time about Repository patterns and stuff, and why should be classes like this persistence-ignorant, but I can't seem to find any materials on this thing he did. Because my application will consist of modules, I think this may help to solve my problems without a need for creating some centralized store for my entities... Every module would simply take care of itself including persistence of its entities.

I think the code would look like is something like this:

public class Person : IEntity
{
   public int ID { get;set; }
   public string Name { get;set; }

   public void Save()
   {
       ..
   }

   public void Update()
   {
   }

   public void Delete()
   {
   }

   ...
}

Seems a bit weird, but... Or maybe I misunderstood what he said in the video?

My second question would be, if you don't agree with this approach, what would be the path you'd take in such modular application?

Please provide an example if possible with some explanation.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The pattern you posted is an Active Record.

The difference between Repository and Active Record Pattern is that in Active Record pattern, data query and persistence, and the domain object are in one class, where as in Repository, the data persistence and query are decoupled from the domain object itself.

Another pattern that you may want to look into is the Query Object which, unlike respository pattern where its number of methods will increase in every possible query (filter, sorting, grouping, etc) the query object can use fluent interface to be expressive [1] or dedicated in which one you may pass parameter [2]

Lastly, you may look at Command Query Responsibility Segregation architecture for ideas. I personally loosely followed it, just picked up ideas that can help me.

Hope this helps.

Update base on comment

One variation of Repository pattern is this

UserRepository
{
    IEnumerable<User> GetAllUsers()
    IEnumerable<User> GetAllByStatus(Status status)
    User GetUserById(int id)
    ...
}

This one does not scale since the repository get's updated for additional query that way be requested

Another variation is to pass query object as parameter to the data query

UserRepository
{
    IEnumerable<User> GetAll(QueryObject)
    User GetUserById(int id)
    ...
}


var query = new UserQueryObject(status: Status.Single)
var singleUsers = userRepo.GetAll(query)

Some in .Net world, Linq expression is passed instead of QueryObject

var singleUsers = userRepo.GetAll(user => user.Status == Status.Single)

Another variation is to do dedicate Repository for retrieval on one entity by its unique identifier and save it, while query object is used to submit data retrieval, just like in CQRS.

Update 2

I suggest you get familiar with the SOLID principles. These principles are very helpful in guiding you creating a loosely coupled, high cohesive architecture.

Los Techies compilation on SOLID pricples contains good introductory articles regarding SOLID priciples.

share|improve this answer
    
A couple of notes. Entity Framework is not an active record pattern implementation. And that a repository is supposed to be pretty simple (Get, Persist, Delete, not much else). A DAO is more prone to having a lot of different querying methods. –  jl. Apr 12 '13 at 11:23
    
@jl. Thanks for the comment, I've corrected and expanded my answer. –  OnesimusUnbound Apr 12 '13 at 11:50
    
Thank you for the answer! This is some interesting stuff:) Just need to do some research on your suggestions to see what suits me the best. +1 for the effort and helpful suggestions. I'll wait for a while if someone else posts another opinions before selecting the answer. I found out that if I select it too soon, no one else usually bothers to give his opinion. –  walther Apr 12 '13 at 12:03
    
@walther see my second update. I think this is the one you're looking for. –  OnesimusUnbound Apr 12 '13 at 12:22

I'll answer your second question. I think you will be interested as well in Dependency Injection.

I'm not an expert on DI but I'll try to explain as clear as I'm able to.

First off, from wikipedia:

Dependency injection is a software design pattern that allows removing hard-coded dependencies and making it possible to change them, whether at run-time or compile-time.

The primary purpose of the dependency injection pattern is to allow selection among multiple implementations of a given dependency interface at runtime, or via configuration files, instead of at compile time.

There are many libraries around that help you implement this design pattern: AutoFac, SimpleInjector, Ninject, Spring .NET, and many others.

In theory, this is what your code would look like (AutoFac example)

var containerBuilder = new ContainerBuilder();
//This is your container builder. It will be used to register interfaces
// with concrete implementations

Then, you register concrete implementations for interface types:

containerBuilder.RegisterType<MockDatabase>().As<IDatabase>().InstancePerDependency();
containerBuilder.RegisterType<Person>().As<IPerson>().InstancePerDependency();

In this case, InstancePerDependency means that whenever you try to resolve IPerson, you'll get a new instance. It could be for example SingleInstance, so whenever you tried to resolve IPerson, you would get the same shared instance.

Then you build your container, and use it:

 var container = containerBuilder.Build();

 IPerson myPerson = container.Resolve<IPerson>(); //This will retrieve the object based on whatever implementation you registered for IPerson
 myPerson.Id = 1;

 myPerson.Save(); //Save your changes

The model I used in this example:

interface IEntity
{            
    int Id { get; set; }            
    string TableName { get; }
    //etc
}

interface IPerson: IEntity
{
    void Save();
}

interface IDatabase
{
    void Save(IEntity entity);
}

class SQLDatabase : IDatabase
{
    public void Save(IEntity entity)
    {
        //Your sql execution (very simplified)
        //yada yada INSERT INTO entity.TableName VALUES (entity.Id)
        //If you use EntityFramework it will be even easier
    }
}

class MockDatabase : IDatabase
{
    public void Save(IEntity entity)
    {
        return;
    }
}

class Person : IPerson
{
    IDatabase _database;

    public Person(IDatabase database)
    {
        this._database = database;
    }

    public void Save()
    {
        _database.Save(this);
    }

    public int Id
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public string TableName
    {
        get { return "Person"; }
    }
}

Don't worry, AutoFac will automatically resolve any Person Dependencies, such as IDatabase.

This way, in case you wanted to switch your database, you could simply do this:

containerBuilder.RegisterType<SqlDatabase>().As<IDatabase>().InstancePerDependency();

I wrote an over simplified (not suitable for use) code which serves just as a kickstart, google "Dependency Injection" for further information. I hope this helps. Good luck.

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Thank you as well! –  walther Apr 12 '13 at 12:57

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