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I am sure there must be a relatively straightforward way to do this, but it is escaping me at the moment. Suppose I have a SQL table like this:

+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
|  A  |  B  |  C  |  D  |  E  |
+=====+=====+=====+=====+=====+
|  1  |  2  |  3  | foo | bar | << 1,2
+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
|  1  |  3  |  3  | biz | bar | << 1,3
+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
|  1  |  2  |  4  |  x  |  y  | << 1,2
+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
|  1  |  2  |  5  | foo | bar | << 1,2
+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
|  4  |  2  |  3  | foo | bar | << 4,2
+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
|  1  |  3  |  3  | foo | bar | << 1,3
+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+

Now, I want to know how many times each combination of values for columns A and B appear, regardless of the other columns. So, in this example, I want an output something like this:

+-----+-----+-----+
|  A  |  B  |count|
+=====+=====+=====+
|  1  |  2  |  3  |
+-----+-----+-----+
|  1  |  3  |  2  |
+-----+-----+-----+
|  4  |  2  |  1  |
+-----+-----+-----+

What would be the SQL to determine that? I feel like this must not be a very uncommon thing to want to do.

Thanks!

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8 Answers 8

up vote 27 down vote accepted
SELECT A,B,COUNT(*)
FROM the-table
GROUP BY A,B
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TRY:

SELECT
    A, B , COUNT(*)
    FROM YourTable
    GROUP BY A, B
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This should do it:

SELECT A, B, COUNT(*) 
FROM TableName
GROUP BY A, B;
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SELECT A,B,COUNT(1) As COUNT_OF
FROM YourTable
GROUP BY A,B
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SELECT A,B,COUNT(*)
FROM table
GROUP BY A,B
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SELECT A, B, COUNT(*) FROM MyTable GROUP BY A, B

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I agree with Lukasz Lysik, KM, pmarflee, astander, Ken White and Radu094 answers.

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yes, there definitely seems to be a consensus! –  pkaeding Oct 20 '09 at 20:28
4  
I didn't mark you down, but this is better served as a comment on the question. –  OMG Ponies Oct 20 '09 at 20:28
    
know your meme! –  Rodrigo Oct 20 '09 at 20:35

This could be the answer:

SELECT a, b, COUNT(*) 
FROM <your table name here> 
GROUP BY a,b 
ORDER BY 3 DESC;
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1  
Also correct, but ordering by ordinals isn't a good habit iirc. –  OMG Ponies Oct 20 '09 at 20:29
    
I thought I'd be the first to answer T_T. –  snahor Oct 20 '09 at 20:30
    
@rexem I suppose you say it because of readability, I can't find other reason. –  snahor Oct 20 '09 at 20:33
1  
@snahor: It's because the ordinal is associated with the position in the SELECT. If it moves, your ordering changes. –  OMG Ponies Oct 20 '09 at 20:45

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