Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I want to use the PageObject link method in my class initialisation, but I can't manage to do it :(

Here what I'm trying to do:

class MyPage
  include PageObject

  def initialize
      link_names.each do |link_name|
           link link_name, :id => "id_#{link_name}"
      end
  end

  def link_names
    ...get link names from DB...
  end

end

When I run Cucumber at the moment of the creation of the instance of the MyPage object I get this error:

undefined method `link' for #<MyPage:0xa8dcf20> (NoMethodError)

What I'm doing at the moment to avoid this issue is the following:

class MyPage
  include PageObject

  link_names = ['link_a', 'link_b']
  link_names.each { |link_name|
     link link_name, :id => "id_#{link_name}"
   }
end

This is working fine, but I don't want to have the link names hardcoded in my module.

Also I cannot understand why the method is not available at the moment of the initialisation in the first case.

share|improve this question
    
link (and the other accessor methods) are class level methods. That is why it is not available within the initialize method. – Justin Ko Apr 12 '13 at 13:15
    
Any suggestion on how I can achieve what I want (i.e.: avoid to have hardcoded link names in my class), but in a different way ? – barbasa Apr 12 '13 at 13:30
up vote 1 down vote accepted

link (and the other accessor methods) are class level methods. That is why it is not available within the initialize method.

You could try defining link_names as a class level method and then do what you are doing now.

class MyPage
    include PageObject

    def self.link_names
        #Get the values from the database here
    end
    link_names.each do |link_name|
        link link_name, :id => "id_#{link_name}"
    end
end
share|improve this answer
    
At the end I have used this solution. Thanks for your suggestion. – barbasa Apr 17 '13 at 22:34

There is a fundamental problem with the code you have above. First of all, the page-object gem allows you to declare elements in advanced and it will then generate methods based on those declarations. Another thing that the page-object gem can do is allow you find elements dynamically at runtime and then interact with them. You seem to be trying to combine the two approaches and that will not work. If your goal is to use the generated method approach then Justin's example above seems to be the best approach given your circumstances.

The ability to find an element and call a method on it at runtime (instance level methods) is accomplished by calling the [name]_element method. For example, there is a link_element method available inside all instance methods but it will return an instance of PageObject::Elements::Link. You can call methods on that return object but the call will not generated methods like the class level call to link.

A question for you - Do you know the links in advance? If so, it would be much simpler to just declare

share|improve this answer
    
The links come from the DB, so it is likely that some new will be added and some other removed. That's why I wanted to avoid to declare them statically, so that I won't need to change all the time the test. Also this will avoid information repetition between the test and the application code. – barbasa Apr 15 '13 at 21:45
    
@Chezzy thanks for your explanation. Everything is much clearer to me now. – barbasa Apr 17 '13 at 22:35

In addition to the methods being class level, the page object gem is intended to be used without overriding the constructor. Check this out, https://github.com/cheezy/page-object/wiki/Get-me-started-right-now!.

If you absolutely need to do something on page initialization, then you can define an initialize_page method. You still won't be able to call the class level methods in initialize_page, but you can use it if you want to load in your database information upon initialization of the page object. According to the page object module source, the initialize method checks for an initialize_page method as shown here:

 def initialize(browser, visit=false)
    initialize_accessors if respond_to?(:initialize_accessors)
    initialize_browser(browser)
    goto if visit && respond_to?(:goto)
    initialize_page if respond_to?(:initialize_page)
  end
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.