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I have a DataFrame with timestamped temperature and wind speed values, and a function to convert those into a "wind chill." I'm using iterrows to run the function on each row, and hoping to get a DataFrame out with a nifty "Wind Chill" column.

However, while it seems to work as it's going through, and has actually "worked" at least once, I can't seem to replicate it consistently. I feel like it's something I'm missing about the structure of DataFrames, in general, but I'm hoping someone can help.

In [28]: bigdf.head()
Out[28]: 


                           Day  Temperature  Wind Speed  Year
2003-03-01 06:00:00-05:00  1    30.27        5.27        2003
2003-03-01 07:00:00-05:00  1    30.21        4.83        2003
2003-03-01 08:00:00-05:00  1    31.81        6.09        2003
2003-03-01 09:00:00-05:00  1    34.04        6.61        2003
2003-03-01 10:00:00-05:00  1    35.31        6.97        2003

So I add a 'Wind Chill' column to bigdf and prepopulate with NaN.

In [29]: bigdf['Wind Chill'] = NaN

Then I try to iterate over the rows, to add the actual Wind Chills.

In [30]: for row_index, row in bigdf[:5].iterrows():
    ...:     row['Wind Chill'] = windchill(row['Temperature'], row['Wind Speed'])
    ...:     print row['Wind Chill']
    ...:
24.7945889994
25.1365267133
25.934114012
28.2194307516
29.5051046953

As you can say, the new values appear to be applied to the 'Wind Chill' column. Here's the windchill function, just in case that helps:

def windchill(temp, wind):
    if temp>50 or wind<=3:
        return temp
    else:
        return 35.74 + 0.6215*temp - 35.75*wind**0.16 + 0.4275*temp*wind**0.16

But, when I look at the DataFrame again, the NaN's are still there:

In [31]: bigdf.head()
Out[31]: 

                           Day  Temperature  Wind Speed  Year  Wind Chill
2003-03-01 06:00:00-05:00  1    30.27        5.27        2003  NaN
2003-03-01 07:00:00-05:00  1    30.21        4.83        2003  NaN
2003-03-01 08:00:00-05:00  1    31.81        6.09        2003  NaN
2003-03-01 09:00:00-05:00  1    34.04        6.61        2003  NaN
2003-03-01 10:00:00-05:00  1    35.31        6.97        2003  NaN

What's even weirder is that it has worked once or twice, and I can't tell what I did differently.

I must admit I'm not especially familiar with the inner workings of pandas, and get confused with indexing, etc., so I feel like I'm probably missing something very basic here (or doing this the hard way).

Thanks!

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4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can use apply to do this:

In [11]: df.apply(lambda row: windchill(row['Temperature'], row['Wind Speed']),
                 axis=1)
Out[11]:
2003-03-01 06:00:00-05:00    24.794589
2003-03-01 07:00:00-05:00    25.136527
2003-03-01 08:00:00-05:00    25.934114
2003-03-01 09:00:00-05:00    28.219431
2003-03-01 10:00:00-05:00    29.505105

In [12]: df['Wind Chill'] = df.apply(lambda row: windchill(row['Temperature'], row['Wind Speed']),
                                    axis=1)

In [13]: df
Out[13]:
                           Day  Temperature  Wind Speed  Year  Wind Chill
2003-03-01 06:00:00-05:00    1        30.27        5.27  2003   24.794589
2003-03-01 07:00:00-05:00    1        30.21        4.83  2003   25.136527
2003-03-01 08:00:00-05:00    1        31.81        6.09  2003   25.934114
2003-03-01 09:00:00-05:00    1        34.04        6.61  2003   28.219431
2003-03-01 10:00:00-05:00    1        35.31        6.97  2003   29.505105

.

To expand on the reason for your confusion, I think it stems from the fact that the row variables are copies rather than views of the df, so changes don't propagate:

In [21]: for _, row in df.iterrows(): row['Day'] = 2

We see that it is making the change successfully to the copy, the row variable(s):

In [22]: row
Out[22]:
Day               2.00
Temperature      35.31
Wind Speed        6.97
Year           2003.00
Name: 2003-03-01 10:00:00-05:00

Bu they don't update to the DataFrame:

In [23]: df
Out[23]:
                           Day  Temperature  Wind Speed  Year
2003-03-01 06:00:00-05:00    1        30.27        5.27  2003
2003-03-01 07:00:00-05:00    1        30.21        4.83  2003
2003-03-01 08:00:00-05:00    1        31.81        6.09  2003
2003-03-01 09:00:00-05:00    1        34.04        6.61  2003
2003-03-01 10:00:00-05:00    1        35.31        6.97  2003

The following also leaves df unchanged:

In [24]: row = df.ix[0]  # also a copy

In [25]: row['Day'] = 2

Whereas if we do take a view: (we'll see a change df.)

In [26]: row = df.ix[2:3]  # this one's a view

In [27]: row['Day'] = 3

See Returning a view versus a copy (in the docs).

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I suspected it had something to do with copies vs views, but I was thinking about it the opposite way and really confusing myself. Thanks for the detailed answer! –  wimsy Apr 13 '13 at 13:58
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Try it with:

bigdf['Wind Chill'] = bigdf.apply(lambda x: windchill(x['Temperature'], x['Wind Speed']), axis=1)

for the whole DataFrame at once using your simple windchill function.

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I would say that you don't need any explicit loop. The following hopefully does what you want

bigdf = pd.DataFrame({'Temperature': [30.27, 30.21, 31.81], 'Wind Speed': [5.27, 4.83, 6.09]})

def windchill(temp, wind):
    "compute the wind chill given two pandas series temp and wind"
    tomodify = (temp<=50) & (wind>3) #check which values need to be modified
    t = temp.copy()  #create a new series
    # change only the values that need modification
    t[tomodify] = 35.74 + 0.6215*temp[tomodify] - 35.75*wind[tomodify]**0.16 +
        0.4275*temp[tomodify]*wind[tomodify]**0.16
    return t

bigdf['Wind Chill'] = windchill(bigdf['Temperature'], bigdf['Wind Speed'])

bigdf

   Temperature  Wind Speed  Wind Chill
0        30.27        5.27   24.794589
1        30.21        4.83   25.136527
2        31.81        6.09   25.934114

ps: this implementation of windchill works also with numpy arrays.

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Thanks. My googling revealed that reworking windchill was another option but I was really trying to figure what I was doing wrong the way it was. :) –  wimsy Apr 13 '13 at 14:00
    
Gotcha. Good that you found the explanation –  Francesco Montesano Apr 15 '13 at 8:02
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I have noticed a strange behavior of df.iterrows() in Pandas 0.14.

It return a view of the df if all the elements in df are of the same type, and changes propagate. Otherwise, it returns a copy and changes don't propagate.

As an example:

In [3]: df = DataFrame({'int':randint(0,3,5),'float':random(5)})

In [4]: for index, row in df.iterrows():
          row['float']=2.     

In [5]: df
Out[5]: 
   float  int
0  0.055684    1
1  0.294029    1
2  0.172214    1
3  0.029317    2
4  0.876815    1

In [6]: df = DataFrame({'floatA':random(5),'floatB':random(5)})

In [7]: for index, row in df.iterrows():
            row['floatA']=2.

In [8]: df
Out[8]: 
   floatA    floatB
0       2  0.151687
1       2  0.949148
2       2  0.308997
3       2  0.998701
4       2  0.490225
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